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UI in the News

May, 1999

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ARCHAEOLOGY, May/June 1999 -- Anthropologist KEVIN KELLY of the University of Iowa challenges the recent use of lizard genetic data as evidence about the origins of Polynesians, the inhabitants of the scattered central and eastern Pacific Islands. Kelly says the lizard genetic evidence only deals with the unintentional human transport of this small creature from somewhere in the New Guinea area to Polynesia, not from Taiwan or southern China (where the lizard, in fact, does not exist).
http://www.he.net:80/~archaeol/9905/newsbriefs/pacific.html

AMERICAN HERITAGE, May/June 1999 -- E.F. LINDQUIST’s introduction of the Iowa Every-Pupil Testing Program in 1930 is considered one of the most underrated education initiatives in American history, according to the author of this article. Lindquist, legendary professor in the UI College of Education, founded the Iowa Tests of Basic Skills and co-founded the American College Testing (ACT) program.

INVESTMENT NEWS (New York), May 31 -- A 1997 article by UI finance professor TIM LOUGHRAN took on a landmark 1992 University of Chicago study that had become a manifesto for value investors. The authors claimed that between 1963 and 1990, under-valued stocks outperformed growth stocks. But Loughran said he found that the value effect applies only to small-cap stocks.

NATIONAL LAW JOURNAL, May 31 -- The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF LAW, ranked by U.S. News & World Report as being among the top 25 law schools in the nation, is one of seven top-tier schools for whom the magazine and the American Bar Association has reported different faculty/teacher ratios -- despite their both using the same numbers and formula to arrive at the figures. U.S. News claims the error was the schools', not the magazine's. Iowa faculty are not quoted in the journal article, but some of the schools insist that they did provide the same numbers to the magazine and ABA, or said they didn't look at the ABA report to ensure that the numbers were the same. Others say they intentionally provided higher faculty numbers because they were more accurate than those gathered by the ABA.
http://test01.ljextra.com/na.archive.html/99/05/1999_0526_25.html

TOPEKA CAPITAL-JOURNAL, May 31 -- H. Edward Phillips, former director of the Navy Medical Service Corps, has been named vice chancellor for administration at the University of Kansas Medical Center. Phillips, who has a master's degree in HOSPITAL AND HEALTH-CARE ADMINISTRATION from the University of Iowa, replaces Roger Lambson, who will retire at the end of the year.
http://cjonline.com/stories/060199/kan_briefs.shtml

REUTERS HEALTH, May 31 -- Children of alcoholic parents appear to be at increased risk of a variety of psychiatric disorders and behavioral problems, results of a study suggest. SAMUEL KUPERMAN of the University of Iowa and colleagues at Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Mo., conducted the study, whose findings appear in the June issue of the JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHIATRY.

DENVER ROCKY MOUNTAIN NEWS, May 30 -- An article says that Patricia Renzetti will join the GRADUATE PROGRAM IN CHOREOGRAPHY at the University of Iowa after eight years as unquestioned prima ballerina of Colorado Ballet and four years directing the Academy of Colorado Ballet.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, May 30 -- BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, a professor of leisure studies at the University of Iowa, says that people don't value leisure anymore. "Our energy and enthusiasm is bent toward work. Study after study has shown that time has flowed away from family and community to work and the marketplace."

DAILY NEWS (Woodland Hills, Calif.), May 30 -- Author Kurt Vonnegut, who taught at the UI WRITERS WORKSHOP in 1965 and 1966, writes about the program on the occasion of the publication by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS of "A Community of Writers." Robert Dana, the poet and retired Cornell English professor, edited the book, a collection of essays and recollections regarding the workshop.

ARIZONA REPUBLIC, May 30 -- A story that recommends 10 books by people "upon whom God has smiled" leads off with an anecdote from Kurt Vonnegut about his two years teaching at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS WORKSHOP. "You've got to be a good date for the reader," Vonnegut told his students. After leaving Iowa, Vonnegut said: "You can't teach people to write well. Writing well is something God lets you do or declines to let you do." Among the 10 books listed is "Home Town" by Tracy Kidder, a Writers Workshop alumnus, although the article doesn't mention this fact.
http://www.azcentral.com:80/ent/books/0530sumbooks.shtml

UPI, May 28 -- A robot that will be used to repair the decaying cement and steel shell covering the failed Chernobyl nuclear reactor was developed by a "dream team" of U.S. companies and groups including, SGI, RedZone Robotics, Westinghouse, GiantNetworking, Carnegie Mellon University, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, the Department of Energy, NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab and the Ames Research Center.
http://www.marketwatch.newsalert.com/bin/story?StoryId=Cn04uWbebDtCWntm&FQ=%22Un

DENVER POST, May 27 -- DONALD W. BLACK, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa and one of the few people who study compulsive buying and sexual behavior, says some behaviors -- including shopping, mating and gambling -- fall along a spectrum that runs from normal, healthy behavior to pathological. He said most people fall in the middle.

FEDERAL COMPUTER WEEK, May 27 -- The Energy Department today plans to unveil a robot that was developed using software from NASA's Mars Pathfinder and other technologies invented under federal research grants that will be used to help repair the crumbling Chernobyl nuclear reactor site. RedZone Robotics Inc., Pittsburgh, Pa. developed the $3 million project, along with a team of researchers from DOE, NASA, Carnegie Mellon University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.fcw.com:80/pubs/fcw/1999/0524/web-ukraine-5-27-99.html

USA TODAY, May 27 -- GERALD JOGERST, who teaches courses in geriatrics medicine at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, comments in an article on the aging population about the prospects for gene therapy. "There may be gene therapy for aging. That would really be something," said Jogerst.
http://www.usatoday.com/2000/health/healt001.htm

>FEDERAL COMPUTER WEEK, May 27 -- The Energy Department today plans to unveil a robot that was developed using software from NASA's Mars Pathfinder and other technologies invented under federal research grants that will be used to help repair the crumbling Chornobyl nuclear reactor site. The $3 million project was developed by RedZone Robotics Inc., Pittsburgh, Pa., along with a team of researchers from DOE, NASA, Carnegie Mellon University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.fcw.com:80/pubs/fcw/1999/0524/web-ukraine-5-27-99.html

USA TODAY, May 27 -- GERALD JOGERST, who teaches courses in geriatrics medicine at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, comments in an article on the aging population about the prospects for gene therapy. "There may be gene therapy for aging. That would really be something," said Jogerst.
http://www.usatoday.com/2000/health/healt001.htm

DETROIT NEWS, May 27 -- Few states have comprehensive worker compensation laws, said MARC LINDER, a law professor at the University of Iowa. Louisiana stands out, he said, because it requires coverage of all workers in manual labor, even if classified as independent contractors. His comments appear in an article about the failure of labor laws to protect children hired to sell magazine subscriptions, candy and other merchandise door-to-door in strange neighborhoods and distant communities.
http://www.detnews.com/1999/nation/9905/27/05270189.htm

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, May 27 -- Dale A. Koike, an associate professor of Spanish and Portuguese at the University of Texas at Austin, and JUDITH E. LISKIN-GASPARRO, an assistant professor of Spanish and Portuguese at the University of Iowa, question in the spring issue of the "ADFL Bulletin" the appropriateness of using "near-native" language proficiency as a standard for employment in foreign-language departments. A summary of their discussion appears in the Chronicle's Magazines &Journal's section.
http://www.chronicle.com/daily/99/05/99052701j.htm

SEATTLE TIMES, May 26 -- MARY BERG, a University of Iowa pharmacy professor, is quoted in an article about the role gender might play in the effects of certain drugs. "You've got to look at each medication," said Berg in the Associated Press article.
http://archives.seattletimes.com/cgi-bin/texis.mummy/web/vortex/display?storyID=374d12fe7b&query=%22University+of+Iowa%22

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, May 26 -- CHRISTINE GRANT, athletic director at the University of Iowa, is quoted in an article about the increasing risks of physical contact between coaches and players. "I've had to sit down with my coaches and make them aware that what previously may have been acceptable, like patting a player on the bottom, is not acceptable now," said Grant. "One-on-ones are risky; closed doors are risky." The article was written by the NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, May 25 -- Sunscreen alone isn't enough to protect your skin from the damaging effects of the sun, says University of Iowa dermatologist ROGER CEILLEY. Kids need to do other things to guard against sun damage, like wear protective hats and sunglasses or seek shade until 4 p.m. "Sun safety is just like car safety," Ceilley says. "It's something you need to think about every day."

WEEKLY WORLD NEWS, May 25 -- A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study found that people who vent their anger on inanimate objects -- by punching pillows, throwing rocks or kicking over garbage cans, for example -- become angrier and more hostile, not less.

NATIONAL LAW JOURNAL, May 24 -- A New Jersey Supreme Court special master has recommended ending the use an "index-of-outcomes" test devised a decade ago by court-appointed statistician DAVID BALDUS, a University of Iowa law professor. The test has been used to decide whether the death penalty is imposed uniformly.

NEW ORLEANS CITYBUSINESS, May 24 -- H.D. HOOVER, a professor at the University of Iowa and author of the Iowa Tests of Basic Skills, is quoted in an article about low test scores in Orleans Parish public schools. Hoover says that given the parish's levels of poverty and illiteracy, the test scores were not unexpected.

NEW YORK TIMES, May 24 -- Author Kurt Vonnegut, who taught at the UI WRITERS WORKSHOP in 1965 and 1966, writes about the program on the occasion of the publication by the University of Iowa Press of "A Community of Writers." Robert Dana, the poet and retired Cornell English professor, edited the book, a collection of essays and recollections regarding the workshop.

SLATE, May 24 -- The $30 million gift from Henry B. Tippie to the UI COLLEGE OF BUSINESS is listed as the fifth largest in Slate's list of the 60 largest American personal charitable contributions for the first quarter (January through March) of 1999.
http://www.slate.com/Slate60/99-05-21/Slate60.asp

NEW YORK TIMES, May 23 -- DAVID SCHOENBAUM, who teaches history at the University of Iowa and is working on a social history of the violin, is the author of an article about American immigrants who became masters of the violin.

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, May 21 -- KENDALL THU, adjunct assistant professor of anthropology at the University of Iowa, responds to comments about an earlier opinion piece he authored on the need for anthropologists to return to the roots of their profession, namely the study of food distribution patterns in societies.
http://www.chronicle.com/weekly/v45/i37/37b00301.htm

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, May 21 -- The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS is cited as an exception in an article that says many academic medical centers -- once a financially healthy part of American universities -- are now struggling just to survive. In smaller markets, dominant university hospitals -- those owned by Duke University and the University of Iowa, for example -- are still relatively healthy. Even those hospitals, however, see that in time, the same forces are going to squeeze them.
http://www.chronicle.com/weekly/v45/i37/37a03801.htm

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, May 21 -- A Chronicle survey of 306 N.C.A.A. Division I institutions found that the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is in compliance with Title IX's scholarship requirements, which mandate that athletics programs give female athletes scholarships in proportion to the number of female athletes in the program, unless there are legitimate, non-discriminatory factors at work -- such as if a college decided to phase in scholarships for a new team.
http://chronicle.com/free/v45/i37/37a00101.htm

OMAHA WORLD-HERALD, May 21 -- The Iowa Board of Regents approved pay raises averaging 4 percent for employees at Iowa's three state universities, including the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.

ST. PAUL PIONEER PRESS, May 20 -- DONALD W. BLACK, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa and one of the few people who study compulsive buying and sexual behavior, says some behaviors -- including shopping, mating and gambling -- fall along a spectrum that runs from normal, healthy behavior to pathological. He said most people fall in the middle.

SEATTLE TIMES, May 20 -- DONALD W. BLACK, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa and one of the few people who study compulsive buying and sexual behavior, says some behaviors -- including shopping, mating and gambling -- fall along a spectrum that runs from normal, healthy behavior to pathological. He said most people fall in the middle.
http://archives.seattletimes.com/cgi-bin/texis.mummy/web/vortex/display?storyID=374481381e&query=%22University+of+Iowa%22

PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, May 20 -- DONALD W. BLACK, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa and one of the few who study compulsive buying and sexual behavior, says some behaviors -- including shopping, mating and gambling -- fall along a spectrum that runs from normal, healthy behavior to pathological. He said most people fall in the middle.
http://www.phillynews.com/inquirer/99/May/20/national/COMPUL20.htm

USA TODAY, May 20 -- Republican presidential candidate Sen. Bob Smith, R-N.H., gets a warm "wingshake" and what appears to be a "feathers-up" from the Iowa Hawkeyes mascot, Herky, during a campaign stop at Riverfest at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. A photo of the pair and the above caption ran in a collection of briefs under the heading "Slightly off center."
http://www.usatoday.com/news/nweird.htm

POSTNET.COM, May 19 -- A new online support group for Iowans with cancer has been set up by health specialists at the University of Iowa, reports this Associated Press article. "We are such a rural state, some folks cannot travel the distance (to join a support group)," said JOY SUTTER, an oncology social worker and the chief online moderator of the site.

USA TODAY, May 19 -- Author Tracy Kidder is featured in an article about his latest book, Home Town. After a tour of duty in Vietnam, Kidder studied writing at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA with John Cheever and Raymond Carver. But he said he was more influenced by Seymour Krim, an advocate of the New Journalism -- nonfiction executed with a novelist's flourish.
http://www.usatoday.com/life/enter/books/book094.htm

NEW YORK TIMES, May 19 -- LARRY ZIMMERMAN, director of the American Indian and Native studies program at the University of Iowa, said the Makah Indians' decision to kill a 30-ton female gray whale this week is a much more complicated issue than whether they just like the taste of whale meat. "They may like it, they may not like it," Zimmerman said. "They may say they like it because the dominant society is trying to get them to stop eating it. They're going to have to decide on their own terms."

OREGONIAN, May 19 -- LARRY ZIMMERMAN, director of the American Indian and Native studies program at the University of Iowa, said the Makah Indians' decision to kill a 30-ton female gray whale this week is a much more complicated issue than whether they just like the taste of whale meat. "They may like it, they may not like it," Zimmerman said. "They may say they like it because the dominant society is trying to get them to stop eating it. They're going to have to decide on their own terms."

FRANKFURTER ALLGEMEINE ZEITUNG, May 18 -- Michael Ostern, a scholar from the Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst (DAAD - German Academic Exchange Service), completed two years of study at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Frankfurt student in business administration is studying at the UI because Goethe University has organized an exchange program with Iowa that is designed to enable German students to earn an MBA degree along with their German Betriebswirtschafts-Diplom (graduate degree in business administration) without any loss of time. With the combination of the two degrees, graduates often enter the fast track for international top management and major corporation consulting, according to Dietrich Ohse, a Goethe professor of operations research who initiated the U.S. exchange when he was a visiting professor at Iowa.

BALTIMORE SUN, May 18 -- To help college students calm their wracked nerves as finals approach, many colleges are offering some relief in the form of massages, color therapy, yoga, aspirin and treats. Students at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA recently got free Ben & Jerry's ice cream bars.

SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, May 18 -- For the average person, an SPF15 sunscreen applied thickly (and not sweated or washed off) is probably plenty, says ROGER CEILLEY, M.D., former president of the American Academy of Dermatology and assistant clinical professor of dermatology at the University of Iowa. But to do the most to prevent sun damage, there is an advantage to a higher SPF.

NATIONAL EXAMINER, May 18 -- A University of Iowa study shows that extroverts receive more blood flow to three areas of the brain thought to be involved in outgoing activities such as watching, interaction with others and movement. DEBRA JOHNSON, M.D., said: "These variations in brain activity suggest that a lot of our individual differences have an underlying biological cause."

PHILADELPHIA DAILY NEWS, May 18 -- The Manchester Inc./Diversified Search, affiliated Philadelphia leadership development consulting firms, and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE are co-sponsoring a conference June 18-19 at the Rittenhouse in Philadelphia on how physicians can transform themselves and their careers. The program is designed to explore the problem of physician discontent, identify nontraditional roles physicians play in the workplace and offer a concrete step-by-step plan to aid physicians who want to rejuvenate their careers.
http://www.phillynews.com:80/daily_news/99/May/18/business/BBRF18.htm

SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, May 17 -- Wiley Miller, creator of the cartoon "Non Sequitur," has received his third Reuben Award in four years for best syndicated panel. "Non Sequitur'' also won the Reuben Award, given by the National Cartoonists Society, for "Best Comic Strip" in its first year of publication. Miller left his job as editorial cartoonist at the San Francisco Examiner after his wife was accepted to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S NONFICTION WRITING GRADUATE PROGRAM.

USA TODAY, May 17 -- The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) will pay for a driving simulator at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. NHTSA chief Ricardo Martinez, critical of practices like "dashboard dining," says the agency will study the effects of distraction on drivers.
http://www.usatoday.com/life/cyber/tech/ctf184.htm

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, May 17 -- CAROL SCOTT-CONNER, head of surgery at the University of Iowa, cautions physicians considering performing "prophylactic mastectomies" -- removal of healthy breasts to prevent cancer -- to keep in mind that a significant number of women will not be satisfied with the procedure, even if it may save their lives. Her comments appear in an article about a study that found most women who had the procedure were satisfied with the result and felt it didn't compromise their quality of life.
http://www.startribune.com/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=canc17

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, May 17 -- Pianist and musical scholar Charles Rosen is the 1999 winner of the $50,000 Truman Capote Award for literary criticism, administered by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP. Rosen, an emeritus professor of social thought at the University of Chicago, won for his book "Romantic Poets, Critics, and Other Madmen," published in 1998 by Harvard University Press. The book examines the attitudes and principles of Romantic criticism, and the convergence of Romantic poetry and music.

NEWSDAY, May 17 -- An interview with author Tracy Kidder says that after doing graduate work at the State University at Stony Brook he finally earned a master's at the renowned WRITERS' WORKSHOP at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Iowa experience was revealing -- and humbling, Kidder said. "You go there thinking you are God's gift to the written word and find there are people who think the same thing," he said.

DENVER ROCKY MOUNTAIN NEWS, May 16 -- MARY BERG, a University of Iowa pharmacy professor, is quoted in an article about the role gender might play in the effects of certain drugs. "You've got to look at each medication," said Berg in the ASSOCIATED PRESS article.

BOSTON GLOBE, May 16 -- The work of photographer DAVID PLOWDEN who has been a tenured faculty member at the Illinois Institute of Technology and a visiting professor at the University of Iowa and Grand Valley State University in Michigan, is on display in a retrospective through May 28 at the Spheris Gallery in Walpole. The retrospective is of Plowden's all black-and-white, silver print photographs, including a 1956 photo of a steam locomotive creating its own cumulus cloud as it moves across a snow-covered Minnesota prairie.
http://www.boston.com/dailyglobe2/136/newhampshire/His_focus_is_on_what_man_has_lost+.shtml

>SAN FRANCISCO EXAMINER, May 16 -- Author Nathan Englander, whose book "For the Relief of Unbearable Urges" has gotten rave reviews and recently went into its fourth printing, worked in a commercial photography studio before hitting the IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.sfgate.com:80/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/examiner/archive/1999/05/16/STYLE15514.dtl

SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, May 16 -- MARY BERG, a University of Iowa pharmacy professor, says doctors must look at each medication when determining the appropriate dosage for men and women. The Associated Press article examines a concept scientists only now are investigating: Men and women may have dramatically different reactions to medications, yet very few drugs have been studied to determine the proper dose -- and safety warnings -- according to sex. The same article appeared in the May 16 DETROIT NEWS:
http://detnews.com:80/1999/health/9905/16/05160010.htm
The same article appeared in the May 16 NANDO TIMES:
http://www2.nando.net:80/noframes/story/0,2107,49319-79465-556655-0,00.html
The same article appeared in the May 16 CNN INTERACTIVE:
http://cnn.com:80/HEALTH/women/9905/16/medication.ap/

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, May 16 -- REBECCA ANTHONY, director of the University of Iowa's Educational Placement Office, was quoted in an article about the growing demand for good teachers. "Pockets of growth will put tremendous strain on human resource departments, both in terms of sheer numbers, as well as quality," says Anthony.

DETROIT NEWS, May 16 -- A feature about author Tracy Kidder says that he attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, where one of his teachers was Atlantic Monthly contributing editor Dan Wakefield.

PALM BEACH POST, May 16 -- MARY BERG, a University of Iowa pharmacy professor, says doctors must look at each medication when determining the appropriate dosage for men and women. The article examines a concept scientists only now are investigating: Men and women may have dramatically different reactions to medications, yet very few drugs have been studied to determine the proper dose -- and safety warnings -- according to sex. This article also appeared in the INDIANAPOLIS STAR, SAN DIEGO UNION-TRIBUNE, CINCINNATI ENQUIRER, DAYTON DAILY NEWS, FRESNO BEE, DENVER POST, AKRON BEACON JOURNAL, TULSA WORLD, KNOXVILLE NEWS-SENTINEL and AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMEN.

INFORMATION TODAY, May 15 -- MICHAEL V. PETERSON, M.D., of the internal medicine department of the University of Iowa, created the content for the Virtual Hospital web site, which has a section devoted to the asthma treater.

DAILY GLOBE (Ironwood, Mich.), May 15 -- ROGER CEILLEY, a University of Iowa dermatologist, is co-chairing the American Academy of Dermatology's National Coalition on Sun Safety. The coalition worked with the safer-playground group KaBoom to open the nation's first specially designed "sun-safe playground" on New York's Staten Island last month. "Sun safety is just like car safety," Ceilley said. "It's something you need to think about every day."

CBS.COM, May 15 -- ROGER CEILLEY, a University of Iowa dermatologist, is co-chairing the American Academy of Dermatology's National Coalition on Sun Safety. The coalition worked with the safer-playground group KaBoom to open the nation's first specially designed "sun-safe playground" on New York's Staten Island last month. "Sun safety is just like car safety," Ceilley said. "It's something you need to think about every day." The same article appeared May 14 on CNN INTERACTIVE.

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, May 14 - Dennis Lundy, the Northwestern University football player who bet against his own team in a 1994 game against the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, was sentenced last week to a month in jail for lying to a grand jury about the incident.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v45/i36/36a05001.htm

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, May 14 -- ROGER CEILLEY, a University of Iowa dermatologist, is co-chairing the American Academy of Dermatology's National Coalition on Sun Safety. The coalition worked with the safer-playground group KaBoom to open the nation's first specially designed "sun-safe playground" on New York's Staten Island last month. The same Associated Press article ran May 14 on the WASHINGTON POST web site, on the NEW YORK TIMES web site, on the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE web site, the TAMPA BAY TRIBUNE and the FOX NEWS web site:
http://www.foxnews.com/js_index.sml?content=/news/national/0514/d_ap_0514_15.sml
The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran May 14 on the LAS VEGAS SUN web site:
http://www.lasvegassun.com/sunbin/stories/thrive/1999/may/13/051400935.html

WALL STREET JOURNAL, May 14 -- At the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, 49 women rowers have a $440,000 university budget, including 12 scholarships, travel expenses, new boats, three paid coaches, a paid rigger to maintain equipment and television in the weight room. Meanwhile, nonvarsity men have a total university stipend of $1,500. "It's a touchy subject," says Jon Rosmann, a 21-year-old Iowa rower. "I'm glad that the women have been granted varsity status because men are usually at an advantage with football and basketball... But at the same time, I can't believe, like, the amount of money they're getting and the fact that we're getting barely any."
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve.cgi?id=SB926632401561994722.djm

>SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, May 13 -- MARY BERG, a University of Iowa pharmacy professor, says doctors must look at each medication when determining the appropriate dosage for men and women. The article examines a concept scientists only now are investigating: Men and women may have dramatically different reactions to medications, yet very few drugs have been studied to determine the proper dose -- and safety warnings -- according to sex.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/1999/05/13/national1457EDT3034.DTL

CNET, May 12 -- HERB HOVENKAMP, a professor of law at the University of Iowa, comments in an article about the recent flurry of mergers and acquisitions involving AT&T, including Microsoft's $5 billion investment in the company. "A merger between two firms that only make complementary products is very hard to challenge under existing law," Hovenkamp said. "The only mergers that get any serious examination are ones where companies are competitors or close to being competitors."
http://www.news.com/SpecialFeatures/0,5,0-36288,00.html

WALL STREET JOURNAL, May 12 -- UI doctoral candidate Royce Webb, who has started a Web sports magazine called SportsJones, is profiled by the newspaper. Webb, the site's founder, publisher and editor, says his page is intended to provide an "intelligent, progressive alternative to Sports Illustrated and ESPN." This story appears only in the Wall Street Journal's interactive, or web, edition, not in the print edition of the newspaper.
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve.cgi?id=SB925941366469147407.djm

STATES NEWS SERVICE, May 12 -- Chinese students have staged a second day of protests on the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the Iowa State University campuses to protest the bombing of the Chinese Embassy in Yugoslavia. Meanwhile, nearly 100 students gathered in front of the Old Capitol building in Iowa City Monday to call for peace and hold a memorial service for the three Chinese officials killed in the bombing. Chinese Association leader Atu Reyong Wahn says he hopes that politics do not get in the way of a good relationship between Chinese and American citizens.

EDUCATION WEEK, May 12 -- SANDRA BOWMAN DAMICO, a professor at Emory University in Atlanta, has been appointed the dean of the college of education at the University of Iowa. Damico will replace STEVEN R. YUSSEN.

TALLAHASSEE DEMOCRAT, May 11 -- Renowned educator Marva Collins has promised educators in poor, rural school districts in Florida that by working with teachers this summer, she's going to help make students' scores on the IOWA STANDARDIZED TEST "soar." According to Collins, four Oklahoma schools that used her teaching methods in 1990 reaped an average increase on the Iowa Standardized Test of more than 172 percent; four schools that did not only saw gains of 10 percent. The Iowa Standardized Test was developed at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.

NEW YORK TIMES, May 11 -- MICHAEL D'ALESSANDRO, a co-founder and director of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA MEDICAL CENTER'S VIRTUAL HOSPITAL, said only 10 percent of the visitors to its site are from the state -- 20 percent are from outside the country. D'Alessandro said the Virtual Hospital contains digital versions of hundreds of medical textbooks and research, in essence opening the bookshelves of the staff at the medical center to the world.

BALTIMORE SUN, May 11 -- Genevieve Schrier, a 17-year-old high school senior who says she is going to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA with a double major in English and political science, is quoted in a story about a career fair in the Baltimore area.

REUTERS HEALTH, May 11 -- STEPHEN K. HUNTER, who conducted murine studies at the University of Iowa, found that encapsulating pancreatic islet cells in a gelatin before transplanting them is a promising strategy for controlling diabetes during pregnancy.

INSIGHTMAG.COM, May 10 -- University of Iowa law professor JOHN WHISTON is quoted in an online version of an article about how Veterans' Affairs workers' compensation claims defraud the department of millions of dollars, and the backlog of suspect cases ensures that the taxpayers' pockets will be picked well into the future. "The federal workers' compensation program is 'awful' compared with those of states involving private workers," Whiston says. "In the federal system, there is no judicial review compared with states in which cases are argued before a judge."

U.S. NEWS & WORLD REPORT, May 10 -- DONALD BLACK, a University of Iowa psychiatrist, said he finds in Internet writings by Columbine High School gunman Eric Harris evidence that the student had a sense of superiority, a lack of remorse, no conscience, disregard for others and the need for revenge. "It's a myth that behind any horrific act like this there must be some kind of longtime trauma or abuse," said Black, author of Bad Boys, Bad Men. "Most antisocial children I treat have pretty normal parents and pretty ordinary home lives."

ARIZONA REPUBLIC, May 10 - Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) has not done much campaigning in person in Iowa, which may hurt his chances in the Iowa Caucuses. "When it comes to voting in the caucuses, the people who are going to be out and participating do tend to be a bit more hawkish, but they also tend to be much more conservative, and that's what hurts McCain, I think," said ARTHUR MILLER, a UI political scientist.
http://www.azcentral.com:80/news/0510mciowa.shtml

>THE NATIONAL LAW JOURNAL, May 10 -- ADRIEN WING, University of Iowa law professor, was profiled in a May 10 National Law Journal article about the work she did to help Palestinians draft an interim constitution in 1996. "I viewed my job as a facilitator. I was not there to dictate to them what they should do." Wing said she has little hope that the document will gain "legal footing anytime soon."

NEWS-TRIBUNE (Tacoma, Wash.), May 9 -- Catherine Denial, a 27-year-old graduate student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, ignored critics and tuned in to the NBC drama "Providence" and was hooked. "I watch shows that tackle issues important to my own life and dress up my beliefs ... in a better wardrobe with a cuter supporting cast," she says.

MILWAUKEE JOURNAL SENTINEL, May 9 -- BASIL THOMPSON, artistic director of the Milwaukee Ballet Company, has accepted a position as full professor in the University of Iowa dance department.

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, May 7 -- ALVIN SNIDER, a professor of English at the University of Iowa and author of Origin and Authority in 17th Century England, discusses in an editorial the threat to rigorous academic debate posed by "compulsory niceness."
http://www.chronicle.com/weekly/v45/i35/35a06401.htm

DESERETNEWS.COM, May 5 -- A feature on the $3 million Pioneer robot that will be used to help shore up the makeshift sarcophagus enclosing the crippled Chernobyl reactor says the robot is a joint project of the Department of Energy and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, with the involvement of three national labs, two NASA research labs, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Carnegie Mellon University.
http://deseretnews.com:80/dn/view/0,1249,80002279,00.html

NEW YORK TIMES, May 5 -- A New Jersey judge has suggested that the state court consider an alternative to an index-of-outcomes test used in capital punishment cases and designed in 1990 by DAVID C. BALDUS, a law professor at the University of Iowa who was appointed by the court as a special master. The system, which compared and weighed death penalty cases on a statistical basis with other cases, was adopted in 1992 by the New Jersey Supreme Court as part of the proportionality review phase of death penalty cases.

ARKANSAS DEMOCRAT-GAZETTE, May 5 -- RONALD M. LAUER of the University of Iowa College of Medicine comments on researchers' claims that ordinary hospital CT scanners can be modified to snap stop-action pictures of the heart, offering a new way of detecting dangerously clogged arteries years before they cause trouble. "This is an important breakthrough, but we still need to know more" about how the scans compare with those taken with super-fast machines, Lauer said in this Associated Press article.

BOSTON GLOBE, May 5 -- A feature about author Tracy Kidder says that he attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, where one of his teachers was Atlantic Monthly contributing editor Dan Wakefield.
http://www.boston.com/dailyglobe2/125/living/Kidder_country+.shtml

STATES NEWS SERVICE, May 5 -- Former patients talk about the treatment they received from University Hospitals and the College of Medicine in an ad campaign launched to unveil UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HEALTH CARE. UIHC will serve as an umbrella organization for the services provided by University Hospitals and the medical school.

CHICAGO SUN-TIMES, May 4 -- A feature about poet Maureen Seaton and "spoken word" poetry mentions that in 1995 she won the prestigious Iowa Prize for Poetry from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.

STATES NEWS SERVICE, May 4 -- A more than $2 million dollar health care facility has opened its doors in Toledo. The facility is the first of its kind in the county and means most local patients will no longer have to drive to Waterloo or Iowa City for treatment. The Deer Creek Health Center is a joint project of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S COMMUNITY MEDICAL SERVICES program and the Grinnell Medical Center.

AHA NEWS, May 3 -- The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA will establish a College of Public Health and for the first time will award master’s of public health degrees.

WASTE NEWS, May 3 -- The University of Iowa is considering closing the medical college’s medical waste incinerator, citing high costs to retrofit the facility. DUANE DERAAD, university utilities director, said: "I would think that a lot of people are doing this."

CHICAGO SUN-TIMES, May 3 -- A profile on Susan Kelsey, president and chief executive officer of Goodwill Industries of Metropolitan Chicago, mentions that she has a bachelor’s degree in business administration from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.

PEOPLE, May 3 -- In 1988 University of Iowa Ph.D. candidate LOUIS LICHT secured funding for a proposed project to use poplar trees to reduce pollutants in waterways. In 1990 Licht started Ecolotree, an Iowa City company that uses poplars to clean up environmental trouble spots.

FITNESS, May 1999 -- University of Iowa psychology professor DAVID WATSON is quoted in a story that gives readers a chance to take a mood test. Watson says that a "minor change in the way you operate can make major improvements in your state of mind."

INDIVIDUAL INVESTOR, May 1999 -- TIM LOUGHRAN, professor of finance at the University of Iowa, comments on a new company that is offering initial public offerings of stock to any comer through its Web site -- a move expected to shake up traditional Wall Street investors.

POPULAR SCIENCE, May 1999 -- GARY V. DOERN, a University of Iowa microbiology professor, discusses a case in which an 86-year-old man died of Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria. "He got infected with a bug for which there isn't effective therapy," Doern said in the article on "Superbugs." "Five years ago, that never occurred."

GOVERNMENT TECHNOLOGY, May 1999 -- The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's "Acceptable Use of Information Technology Resources Policy" is being reviewed by students, faculty and staff. The policy will be the university’s definition of acceptable usage of its electronic technology, including student e-mail accounts.

GOOD HOUSEKEEPING, May 1999 -- ROGER CEILLEY, M.D., assistant clinical professor of dermatology at the University of Iowa, advises people to take vitamins to enhance the skin because vitamins C and E are antioxidants that help inhibit the aging process.

BETTER HOMES & GARDENS, May 1999 -- Researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA studied 40 people with seasonal allergic rhinitis. They were asked to drive on a closed course after taking either alcohol, a non-sedating antihistamine, a sedating antihistamine or a placebo. Those who took a sedating antihistamine had the poorest driving record.

PHARMACY TODAY, May 1999 -- The article summarizes marketing strategies provided by RANDY MCDONOUGH of the University of Iowa College of Pharmacy at the recent National Managed Health Care Congress annual meeting.

OUTSIDE, May 1999 -- Outside magazine contributing editor MARK LEVINE, who is currently teaching poetry at the University of Iowa Writers' Workshop, authored a story on Terry Freitas. Freitas was murdered in March along with two other American activists who were trying to help indigenous people of northern Colombia stop a petroleum company from drilling an oil field within their ancestral territory. A brief biography on Levine can be found at:
http://www.outsidemag.com:80/magazine/0599/9905btl.html
Levine's story, "Epitaph for a Crusader," can be found at:
http://www.outsidemag.com:80/magazine/0599/9905freitas.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

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