The University of Iowa
University News Services
Archives Services Contact Us A-Z Search

UI in the News

March, 1999

See UI in the New Archive Index

TECHNOLOGY BUSINESS, March/April 1999 -- The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA received $35 million in patents from the DuPont corporation.

GANNETTEER, March/April 1999 -- Prior to its performance at HANCHER AUDITORIUM last November, Taylor 2 -- a group of six young dancers from the Paul Taylor Dance Company -- performed for Iowa City Press-Citizen employees and their families in the newspaper's mailroom. The performances are part of Hancher's ongoing efforts to bring performing arts into the community.

WOMEN’S HEALTH ACCESS, March/April 1999 -- JEFFREY S. WILSON, a University of Iowa pulmonary physician, says the thinner air in airplanes during flight does not pose a health risk to travelers. But he says the lower oxygen concentration may produce symptoms in people with heart or lung disease.

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, March 28 -- Minnie Alexander, who attended law school at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is one of eight Twin Cities women in their 20s and 30s who are emerging as community leaders. Alexander is an attorney with the law firm Dorsey & Whitney and a member of the YWCA board of directors.
http://www.startribune.com/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=WOMVAR&date=28-Mar-99&word=iowa&word=university&word=of (password may be required)

NAPLES (Fla.)DAILY NEWS, March 28 -- UI Professor of Psychiatry DONALD W. BLACK’s book "Bad Boys, Bad Men: Confronting Antisocial Personality Disorder" is reviewed on the paper’s "Books Page."

THE (S.C.) STATE, March 27 -- ROBERT FORSYTHE, an associate dean in the UI College of Business, is quoted in an article on on-line rumors. The story refers to a UI study that found people should be especially wary of sources providing stock tips online.

SAN ANTONIO (Texas) EXPRESS-NEWS, March 27 - RONALD M. LAUER of the University of Iowa College of Medicine comments on researchers' claims that ordinary hospital CT scanners can be modified to snap stop-action pictures of the heart, offering a new way of detecting dangerously clogged arteries years before they cause trouble. "This is an important breakthrough, but we still need to know more" about how the scans compare with those taken with super-fast machines, Lauer said in this ASSOCIATED PRESS article.

SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, March 27 -- RONALD M. LAUER of the University of Iowa College of Medicine comments on researchers' claims that ordinary hospital CT scanners can be modified to snap stop-action pictures of the heart, offering a new way of detecting dangerously clogged arteries years before they cause trouble. "This is an important breakthrough, but we still need to know more" about how the scans compare with those taken with super-fast machines, Lauer said in this Associated Press article. The same Associated Press article ran March 6 in the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/1999/03/27/national0104EST0418.DTL
(password may be required)

STATES NEWS SERVICE, March 26 -- EBI GASHI, who is pursuing a master's degree in journalism at the University of Iowa, finally made contact Thursday with his family, which has been holed up in an apartment in Pristina, the capitol of Kosovo, since NATO attacks began. Gashi said his family will probably stay in the country because his father in his 70s and is a strong believer in his homeland.

ABCNEWS.COM, March 26 -- RONALD M. LAUER of the University of Iowa College of Medicine comments on researchers' claims that ordinary hospital CT scanners can be modified to snap stop-action pictures of the heart, offering a new way of detecting dangerously clogged arteries years before they cause trouble. "This is an important breakthrough, but we still need to know more" about how the scans compare with those taken with super-fast machines, Lauer said in this Associated Press article.

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, March 26 -- BRUCE E. GRONBECK, a professor of communication studies at the University of Iowa, is quoted in an article about the growing number of rhetoric and communication classes offered by colleges and universities. "If someone talks in a way that does not fit with our idea of how a credible speaker should talk, we're less likely to pay attention to what that person has to say," says Gronbeck.
http://www.chronicle.com/colloquy/99/speech/background.htm
(password may be required)

THE (Los Angeles) TIDINGS, March 26 -- A study of sentencing patterns in Georgia by DAVID BALDUS of the University of Iowa is quoted in an opinion piece on the death penalty. His study concluded that a person accused of killing a white person was more than four times as likely to receive the death penalty as someone accused of killing an African American.

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, March 26 -- The work of Washington University biologists who have helped reintroduce wood frogs on the St. Louis campus is chronicled in "Status and Conservation of Midwestern Amphibians," a book published last year by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS.
http://www.chronicle.com/weekly/v45/i29/29a01403.htm
(password may be required)

WALL STREET JOURNAL, March 25 -- The United Electrical Workers are active in union negotiations for graduate teachers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. This fact is mentioned in an editorial by Paul Kennedy, a professor of history at Yale University, that is generally derisive of the growing number of alliances being forged between university students and workers' unions.
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve.cgi?id=SB922310631647974707.djm (password may be required)

STATES NEWS SERVICE, March 25 -- University of Iowa law professor BURNS WESTON, considered the school's authority on Kosovo who traveled there last year, says the United States had to get involved in the bombings there because it has to protect civil rights of others just as it does in this country.
http://news.lycos.com/stories/local/iowa/19990325rtiowa-news-summary.asp (password may be required)

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, March 25 -- Chaska High School in Minnesota will gradually abandon using its Hawks symbol for sports teams, according to the Chaska Herald, after being notified by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA that its Hawk was a trademark infringement of the Hawkeyes' logo. Iowa's logo was commissioned by recently retired football coach Hayden Fry around 1979 or '80.
http://www.startribune.com/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisStory=70816369 (password may be required)

USA TODAY, March 25 -- The salary gap between UNIVERSITY OF IOWA senior administrators and faculty is widening as professors' wages begin to fall in comparison to their Big Ten Conference colleagues. A report to the Faculty Senate showed that the difference in earnings grew by nearly 22 percent, or $15,000, during the past five years. In that time, college deans and top administrators received annual raises averaging 4.6 percent, versus faculty raises of 4.1 percent, according to the report.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/states/iamain.htm (password may be required)

NEW YORK TIMES, March 23 -- According to University of Iowa researchers, including JOHN W. ELY, associate professor of family medicine, family doctors with the most impressive credentials were most likely to be sued. Ely speculated that more experienced, board certified doctors might be taking care of sicker patients.

NEW YORK TIMES, March 23 -- MARY BLEGEN, associate dean for academic affairs at the University of Iowa's nursing school, is quoted in an article on the nationwide shortage of registered nurses at hospitals. In an effort to fill voids left by nursing cutbacks four or five years ago, Blegen said, "recruiters are coming in from all over the country, and they're talking about sign-on bonuses."

ARIZONA REPUBLIC, March 23 -- The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is scheduled to open a new College of Public Health July 1. The new college will be the 11th college at UI and the first addition since 1949.

STATES NEWS SERVICE, March 23 -- Southwest Missouri State men's basketball coach STEVE ALFORD has been named the new head basketball coach at the University of Iowa. Athletic Director BOB BOWLSBY says Alford, who replaces TOM DAVIS, has agreed to a five-year deal that will pay him more than $500,000 a year. This brief appeared in the news service's Iowa news summary.

STATES NEWS SERVICE, March 23 -- Southwest Missouri State is shopping for a new men's basketball coach after STEVE ALFORD was introduced yesterday as head basketball coach at the University of Iowa. Alford replaces veteran Hawkeye coach TOM DAVIS whose contract was not renewed after 13 seasons. This brief appeared in the news service's Missouri news summary.

USA TODAY, March 23 -- In a story announcing STEVE ALFORD’s hiring as the University of Iowa's men's basketball coach, the former Southwest Missouri State coach says he intends to stay in Iowa City a long time. "I am a Big Ten person. Now I am in the Big Ten," said Alford, a two-time All-American who led the Hoosiers to the NCAA title in 1987 and was the school's No. 2 career scorer with 2,438 points.

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, March 23 -- STEVE ALFORD, who guided Southwest Missouri to the NCAA tournament's Sweet 16, was hired Monday to replace TOM DAVIS as the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA men's basketball coach. Davis is Iowa' s winningest coach, but his contract was not renewed after 13 years in Iowa City. This is an ASSOCIATED PRESS article.
The same Associated Press article on Alford ran March 23 in the NEW YORK TIMES and March 23 in the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/1999/03/23/sports0232EST0048.DTL
(password may be required)

BALTIMORE SUN, March 23 -- STEVE ALFORD was hired as the University of Iowa’s basketball coach yesterday after guiding Southwest Missouri State to its best showing in the NCAA tournament. The former Indiana star replaces TOM DAVIS, whose contract was not renewed after 13 years in Iowa City. With a record of 269-140, Davis had the most victories of any coach in Iowa history.
http://www.sunspot.net/cgi-bin/editorial/story.cgi?section=archive&storyid=1150070207631 (password may be required)

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, March 23 -- A story about the Minnesota High School Math League competitions says two 15-member teams, selected from the state's top students, will advance to the national competition June 4-5 at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www2.startribune.com/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=BRF23&date=23-Mar-99 (password may be required)

LAWYERS WEEKLY, March 22 -- University of Iowa law professor PETER BLANCK, who has conducted extensive research on the cost of ADA accommodations, was quoted in a story about the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's recent issuance of an ADA Guidance on "Reasonable Accommodation." Said Blanck: "Employers may want to make their job descriptions more specific, so that it is more clear when an accommodation creates an undue hardship."

NEW YORK TIMES, March 22 -- Rutgers University women's basketball coach C. Vivian Stringer, who took her UNIVERSITY OF IOWA team to the Final Four in 1993, discusses her team's upcoming game against Purdue. "We have to be in control. Our defense arrived -- always does. It arrives much earlier than our offense," Stringer said.

BUSINESS WEEK, March 22 -- University of Iowa antitrust expert HERBERT J. HOVENKAMP is among "an array of respected academics" who endorse the idea of imposing a mandatory licensing plan on Microsoft Corp. The plan would require Microsoft, which is embroiled in a federal antitrust lawsuit, to auction off the Windows source code to two or three other companies that would then create their own versions of the operation system.

WALL STREET JOURNAL, March 22 -- Robert Gehorsam, now senior vice president of programming for Sony Online Entertainment, got his first exposure to computer games on a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA mainframe that he used as a research assistant creating a new grammar for Homeric Greek in 1975. Gehorsam, quoted in a story on the growing popularity of interactive computer games, says "Early games like Space Invaders weren't about winning. They were about fending off doom."
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve.cgi?id=SB921877694802965376.djm (password may be required)

BOSTON GLOBE, March 21 -- GELSY VERNA, who was born in Haiti and teaches at the University of Iowa, is among the artists whose work is featured in "Uncommon Perspectives: Artists from the Caribbean," according to the show's curator, Nancy Cusack. Cusack says Verna is one of a group of "emerging artists with strong exhibition records" whose work is on display at the South Shore Art Center on Cohasset, Mass.
http://www.boston.com/dailyglobe2/080/south/Art_Center_show_widens_its_world_view+.shtml (password may be required)

OMAHA WORLD-HERALD, March 21 -- DEANA HURST, who counsels students as director of business and liberal arts placement for the University of Iowa, is quoted in a story about using e-mail in job searches. GEORGE MCCRORY, associate editor for University News Services, is also quoted about his own experiences using e-mail in job hunts. The same story, which originally appeared in the DALLAS MORNING NEWS Feb. 3, ran March 14 in THE PRESS-ENTERPRISE (Riverside, Calif.), and March 7 in the AKRON (Ohio) BEACON JOURNAL.

NEW YORK TIMES, March 21 -- LINDA KERBER, a professor of history at the University of Iowa, is the author of a new book that examines women's changing rights and obligations throughout American history. In the book, titled "No Constitutional Right to Be Ladies," Kerber "weaves broad constitutional and legal history around fascinating case studies," according to the reviewer.

EL PASO (Texas) TIMES, March 21 -- DONALD BLACK, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, gave a lecture at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center and discussed his book, "Bad Boys, Bad Men: Confronting Antisocial Personality Disorder," which he co-wrote with C. LINDON LARSON.

OMAHA WORLD-HERALD, March 19 -- The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA 's rankings by U.S. News & World Report are summarized in a story and information box about Nebraska and Iowa schools.

EL PASO (Texas) TIMES, March 19 -- DONALD W. BLACK, an expert on anti-social behavior and serial killers at the University of Iowa, said people who commit multiple murders like those recently in Juarez, Texas, usually get caught. "They slip up," said Black an academic and research psychiatrist who was a guest lecturer the week of the murders at Texas Tech Health Sciences Center.

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, March 19 -- MALCOLM J. ROHRBOUGH of the University of Iowa will share the Ray Allen Billington Prize, the Organization of American Historians has announced. Rohrbough is the author of "Days of Gold: The California Gold Rush and the American Nation" (University of California Press, 1997).
http://www.chronicle.com/daily/99/03/99031904n.htm (Online subscription required)

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, March 19 -- Notre Dame officials were said to be courting Southwest Missouri State basketball coach STEVE ALFORD to fill their team's top coaching spot but are "operating on the assumption that Alford is about to move to the University of Iowa," according to the article.

BALTIMORE SUN, March 19 -- Although he is rumored to be a top candidate for the University of Iowa basketball coaching job, Southwest Missouri State basketball coach STEVE ALFORD is focusing on the NCAA tournament. "So that's not something that I'm thinking about right now," Alford said.
http://www.sunspot.net/cgi-bin/editorial/story.cgi?section=archive&storyid=1150070205590 (password may be required)

STATES NEWS SERVICE, March 18 -- The Iowa Board of Regents has given preliminary approval to a five-percent increase in room and board at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Final approval is pending.

FOXNEWS.COM, March 18 -- This article taken from Reuters news service reports that JEFFERY M. JENSON with the University of Iowa School of Social work collaborated on a study of young people on probation in Utah. He found that inhalant abuse correlated with "greater antisocial attitudes, personal and familial dysfunction, and substance abuse" than was evident among the young people's non-inhalant using counterparts.
http://www.foxnews.com/js_index.sml?content=/health/031899/children.sml (password may be required)

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, March 18 -- The paper's NCAA notebook, assembled with news from various wire services before Thursday night's game between the Hawkeyes and Connecticut, called TOM DAVIS' waning days as University of Iowa head coach "one of the bittersweet stories of this tournament." The brief says that UI Athletic Director BOB BOWLSBY chose not to extend Davis' contract beyond this season.
http://www.startribune.com/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=MNOT18&date=18-Mar-99&word=iowa&word=university&word=of (password may be required)

NEW YORK REVIEW OF BOOKS, March 18 -- PETER GREEN, Dougherty Centennial Professor Emeritus at the University of Texas at Austin and adjunct professor of classics at the University of Iowa, critiques "Who Killed Homer? The Demise of Classical Education and the Recovery of Greek Wisdom" by Victor Davis Hanson and John Heath. Their subtitle, writes Green, sets the tone: what they are lamenting is "the demise of Classical education"; what they are hoping to promote is "the recovery of Greek wisdom."
http://www.nybooks.com/nyrev/WWWfeatdisplay.cgi?19990318045R (password may be required)

BOSTON GLOBE, March 18 -- UI men's basketball coach TOM DAVIS established himself as a major Division I coach at Boston College (1977-82) and could end his career tonight against a former Big East rival, the University of Connecticut. A sports article notes that Iowa's success in the NCAA tournament "has caused a mixture of emotions in Iowa City, primarily happiness for Davis, but also uneasiness."
http://www.boston.com/dailyglobe2/077/sports/Davis_going_out_in_style+.shtml (password may be required)

DETROIT NEWS, March 17 -- Some doctors are allowing their patients to contact them by email, but others are reluctant to take this step because they fear sensitive information could be intercepted or they are not in the habit of checking email regularly. GEORGE BERGUS, an associate professor at the UI College of Medicine, is open to e-mailing "nonsensitive information," such as the results of cholesterol and blood sugar tests. STEPHEN STEFANAC, assistant dean for patient services at the UI College of Dentistry, also communicates with his patients via email. (This article originally appeared in the DES MOINES REGISTER.)
http://detnews.com:80/1999/technology/9903/17/03170092.htm (password may be required)

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, March 17 -- The University of Iowa says it will accept the resignation of women's gymnastics coach DIANE DEMARCO, effective June 30. The brief is included in a sports roundup gathered from various wire services.
http://www.startribune.com/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=SPUL17&date=17-Mar-99&word=iowa&word=university&word=of (password may be required)

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, March 17 -- The University of Iowa has accepted the resignation of coach DIANE DEMARCO, whose program was embroiled in controversy this season. Nine of the team's 15 members were suspended March 1 for violating the team's zero-tolerance alcohol policy.
http://chicagotribune.com/splash/article/0,1051,SAV-9903170054,00.html (password may be required)

DETROIT FREE PRESS, March 17 -- Joyce Fisk, a friend of actress Donna Reed, studied radio at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, according to a feature on Reed that was reprinted from the CHEBOYGAN DAILY TRIBUNE. Fisk and Reed became friends while attending high school in Denison and remained so for 45 years, exchanging letters and visiting one another on occasion.
http://www.freep.com/news/mich/ebest17.htm (password may be required)

USA TODAY, March 17 -- TOM DAVIS, the outgoing University of Iowa men's basketball coach profiled by the paper, says he's gratified by the number of people talking to him about coaching elsewhere. "You appreciate people respecting what you've done and how you've done it," Davis said. The story says Davis is 60 years old and, "according to Iowa athletic director BOB BOWLSBY, has run his course."

STATES NEWS SERVICE, March 15 -- A new college will open its doors on the University of Iowa campus July 1. JAMES MERCHANT, UI professor and head of the department of preventive medicine, will lead the new College of Public Health.

ST. PETERSBURG TIMES, March 15 -- JOHN DELANEY, professor of management at the University of Iowa, said spiraling of worker shortages in the nursing home industry and discontent among employees may open the door to union organizing. Delaney said that nursing home executives are hemmed in because when margins narrow they do not have the luxury of moving off-shore like manufacturers in order to find cheap labor or flee unions.
http://www.sptimes.com:80/News/31599/Business/Labor_s_next_recruits.html (password may be required)

SAN GABRIEL VALLEY (Calif.) WEEKLY, March 15 -- Cynthia Kurtz, the Pasadena city manager, studied to become a planner at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where she was drawn to a career in local government. Kurtz was one of several women profiled by this Los Angeles Times Friday supplement in honor of women's history month.

THE VIRGINIAN-PILOT, March 15 -- In a column about online recruiting, DEANNA HURST, director of the UI Business and Liberal Arts Placement Center, said she tells students to test the appearance of an electronic resume by emailing it to a friend. The same column quotes GEORGE MCCRORY, an associate editor for University News Services, about using email to correspond with a potential employer. The story originally ran in the Feb. 3 DALLAS MORNING NEWS.

THE PRESS-ENTERPRISE (Riverside, Calif.), March 14 -- DEANNA HURST, who counsels students as director of business and liberal arts placement for the University of Iowa, is quoted in a story about using e-mail in job searches. GEORGE MCCRORY, associate editor for University News Services, is also quoted about his own experiences using e-mail in job hunts. The same story, which originally appeared in the DALLAS MORNING NEWS Feb. 3, ran March 21 in the OMAHA WORLD HERALD and March 7 in the AKRON BEACON JOURNAL.

CHARLOTTE OBSERVER, March 14 -- CHRISTINE GRANT, women’s athletic director at the University of Iowa, said she has told her coaches that "what previously may have been acceptable, like patting a player on the bottom, is not acceptable now." Grant was quoted in an article about the growing number of sexual harassment lawsuits being filed against male coaches by female players. This story originally appeared in the March 7 edition of the NEW YORK TIMES.

BALTIMORE SUN, March 14 -- "The Rooms of Heaven" by IOWA WRITER’S WORKSHOP graduate Mary Allen is "fluid and fat-free," according to this review of the author's book.

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, March 13 -- TOM ROCKLIN, director of the Center for Teaching at the University of Iowa, says in an article on cheating that teachers can do more to discourage such behavior. E-mails Rocklin received from students who had taken papers off the Internet and turned them in as their own told him they were reacting to poor teaching. "If you take the teaching of writing seriously, you avoid most of the problems associated with downloading term papers from the Net," Rocklin said.
http://www.startribune.com/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=TCJ13 (password may be required)

TORONTO STAR, March 13 -- TIM LOUGHRAN, a University of Iowa business professor, is quoted in a story about Coke’s performance in the stock market. Loughran’s class kept an imaginary portfolio that included Coke stock.

DAYTON (Ohio) DAILY NEWS, March 12 -- ROGER CEILLEY, assistant professor of dermatology at the University of Iowa and past president of the American Academy of Dermatology, said a new UV Detect camera that shows underlying skin damage caused by the sun's rays probably can't detect skin cancer but "is a valuable instructional tool." This KNIGHT RIDDER NEWS SERVICE story originally ran in the DETROIT FREE PRESS March 3.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, March 12 -- JAMES TOMKOVICZ, a criminal law professor at the University of Iowa, said he believes there is "very little precedent" in a federal lawsuit filed by the father of a young drug informant who was murdered. "I've never seen anything about the responsibility of law-enforcement authorities to their informants," Tomkovicz said.
http://chicagotribune.com/splash/article/0,1051,SAV-9903110203,00.html (password may be required)

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, March 12 -- NANCY ANDREASEN, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa, wrote in the current issue of the New England Journal of Medicine that being born in a city might affect schizophrenia by increasing the frequency of infections that a person suffered in the uterus or during childhood. Andreasen's comments in the journal were reported Feb. 24 by REUTERS and Feb. 25 in the NEW YORK TIMES.
http://www.chronicle.com/weekly/v45/i27/27a01802.htm (Online subscription required)

WALL STREET JOURNAL, March 11 -- PETER BLANCK, a University of Iowa law school professor who specializes in disabilities law, said most firms have found the Americans with Disabilities Act much easier to conform to than initially suspected. Blanck studied Sears Roebuck and found that the average cost of conforming -- raising or lowering a desk, putting in a ramp, or altering a dress code--was less than $50; another survey found that three-quarters of all changes cost under $100.
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve.cgi?id=SB921104592343633375.djm (Online subscription required)

USA TODAY, March 10 -- DONALD BLACK, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa, notes that between 2 and 8 percent of the general population is estimated to have difficulty with compulsive shopping although he says he has not had patients with an addiction to Web auctions specifically.
http://www.usatoday.com/life/cyber/tech/cte604.htm (password may be required)

USA TODAY, March 10 -- Linda Myers, a former "restricted earnings" women's basketball assistant at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, praised a $54.5 million settlement between coaching assistants and the NCAA. The case involves about 2,000 assistants in all sports except Division I football limited from 1992 to 1995 to annual salaries of no more than $16,000. "I'm elated and it helps to right a wrong that was done," Myers said.

DALLAS MORNING NEWS, March 9 -- Writer Rita Dove, who earned a master's in fine arts at the IOWA WRITERS WORKSHOP, is one of eight women profiled for Women's History Month by the newspaper. Dove is described as a poet, short story writer and novelist who likes to focus on the tragedies, joys and dreams of ordinary black people.
http://www.dallasnews.com/metro-dfw-nf/womenshistory/women/html/2.htm (password may be required)

SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, March 9 -- HERB HOVENKAMP, a professor of law at the University of Iowa, said that while the FTC faced an uphill challenge in its case against Intel, Intel would have paid a steep price had it lost.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, March 9 -- MICHAEL O'HARA, an expert on postpartum disorders and chairman of the University of Iowa psychology department, discusses the psychoses, which are marked by delusions and distorted perceptions of reality, that some mothers experience,. "They can make themselves think their babies are gods, or devils, that they can fly or are invulnerable to certain things," O'Hara said.
http://chicagotribune.com/splash/article/0,1051,SAV-9903090255,00.html (password may be required)

WEEKLY WORLD NEWS, March 9 -- The tabloid says that new research out of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA reveals the brains of certain people "are actually defective from birth, causing them to make faulty decisions at crucial times, dooming them to a life of failure."

THE NEW YORKER, March 8 -- Tennessee Williams, whose previously unproduced 1938 play "Not About Nightingales" first hit the stage last year at the Royal National Theatre in London, was 26 when he finally graduated with a bachelor's degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S WRITING PROGRAM. The article discusses the play's run in New York's Circle in the Square.

SEATTLE TIMES, March 8 -- HERB HOVENKAMP, author of a well-regarded antitrust treatise and University of Iowa law professor, expressed his doubts about Microsoft and the government striking an acceptable deal in the antitrust case against the software giant. Hovenkamp said he has a "nagging fear he (the trial judge in the case) is going to wuss out and there won't be structural relief." He also said he thinks a breakup of a monopoly is the only solution not harmful to consumers that does not require regulatory supervision.

NEW YORK TIMES, March 8 -- Tennessee Williams was inspired to write "Not About Nightingales" in 1938 while he was a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, according to an article about a production of his play on Broadway. It was at the UI that Williams read a newspaper article about a rebellion of inmates and was inspired by gangster movies of the period, although the play was never performed in his lifetime.

WALL STREET JOURNAL, March 8 -- Win Pe, one of three men profiled by the Asian Wall Street Journal in 1993, was re-interviewed recently to find out what had become of him in the wake of great economic upheaval in Myanmar, formerly known as Burma. Pe, a self-proclaimed "jack-of-all-trades" and now a dissident living in self-imposed exile in the United States, accepted an invitation to participate in an INTERNATIONAL WRITERS PROGRAM at the University of Iowa in 1994 -- and just sort of stayed on.
http://interactive.wsj.com/articles/SB920835697621615500.htm (password may be required)

STATES NEWS SERVICE, March 8 -- The UI MEN'S BASKETBALL TEAM will be playing in Denver, Colo. Thursday in the first round of the NCAA basketball tournament. The team is seeded fifth in the region and will play 12th seeded Alabama-Birmingham. It's the ninth NCAA appearance for the Hawkeyes under Coach Tom Davis.

U.S. NEWS & WORLD REPORT, March 8 -- ROBERT ROBINSON, a University of Iowa neuropsychiatrist, says in a cover story on depression that he finds that most stroke victims who become depressed quickly respond to treatment. "Even though they are unable to talk, walk or feed themselves, they are mentally well and ready to make the most of what they are left with," he said.
http://www.usnews.com/usnews/issue/990308/8depr.htm (password may be required)

SAN ANTONIO (Texas) EXPRESS-NEWS, March 8 -- ROGER CEILLEY, assistant professor of dermatology at the University of Iowa and past president of the American Academy of Dermatology, said a new UV Detect camera that shows underlying skin damage caused by the sun's rays probably can't detect skin cancer but "is a valuable instructional tool."

ARKANSAS DEMOCRAT-GAZETTE, March 8 -- HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a University of Iowa law professor speaking at a New York antitrust conference the previous week, said that companies do not have a duty under the Patent Act to share or license technology simply because it’s important. His comments were included in a story about the Federal Trade Commission’s case against Intel Corp.

AKRON (Ohio) BEACON JOURNAL, March 7 -- DEANNA HURST, who counsels students as director of business and liberal arts placement for the University of Iowa, is quoted in a story about using e-mail in job searches. GEORGE MCCRORY, associate editor for University News Services, is also quoted about his own experiences using e-mail in job hunts. The same story, which originally appeared in the DALLAS MORNING NEWS Feb. 3, ran March 21 in the OMAHA WORLD HERALD and March 14 in THE PRESS-ENTERPRISE (Riverside, Calif.).

NEW YORK TIMES, March 7 -- CHRISTINE GRANT, athletic director at the University of Iowa, is quoted in an article about sexual harassment cases filed by student players against coaches. "I've had to sit down with my coaches and make them aware that what previously may have been acceptable, like patting a player on the bottom, is not acceptable now," Grant said.

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, March 6 -- A decade-old UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study found that defendants convicted of killing whites were 4.3 times more likely to be sentenced to death than those found guilty of murdering blacks. The study was cited in an editorial that spoke against putting to death John William King, the white supremacist condemned by a Texas jury last week for dragging to death a black man.

ATLANTA CONSTITUTION, March 6 -- HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a University of Iowa law professor speaking at a New York antitrust conference the previous week, said that companies do not have a duty under the Patent Act to share or license technology simply because it’s important. His comments were included in a story about the Federal Trade Commission’s case against Intel Corp.

SAN ANTONIO (Texas) EXPRESS-NEWS, March 5 -- RITA CROCKETT, head volleyball coach of the University of Iowa, was inducted into the San Antonio Sports Hall of Fame March 5.

SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, March 5 -- RANDALL P. BEZANSON, a law professor at the University of Iowa, is quoted about U.S. Supreme Court Justice Harry Blackmun, who died March 4. Bezanson, who once clerked for Blackmun, said he and Blackmun were greeted by picketers at an Iowa hotel shortly after the justice issued the controversial Roe v. Wade ruling. "That was the first time he understood the consequences in personal terms," Bezanson said. The article originally appeared March 5 in the WASHINGTON POST.

REUTERS, March 5 -- A gene on the X chromosome may interact with the BRCA1 gene mutation -- a mutation already linked to breast and ovarian cancer -- increasing a woman's risk of developing invasive ovarian cancer, according to a study by a research team led by RICHARD E. BULLER, professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Iowa.

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, March 5 -- Barbara Kerr, a professor of counseling psychology at Arizona State University, discusses a study of honors students she conducted with NICHOLAS COLANGELO, a professor of counselor education at the University of Iowa. The pair found that "bright males are crowding into the few majors -- including business, engineering, and computer science -- that they deem appropriate to both their intelligence and their gender.
http://www.chronicle.com/weekly/v45/i26/26b00701.htm (password may be required)

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, March 5 -- YVONNE (BONNIE) L. SLATTON, chairwoman of the department of physical education and sports studies at the University of Iowa, heads the National Collegiate Athletic Association's Division I Committee. Slatton, commenting on light sanctions the committee issued against Kansas State University in spite of repeated violations, said: "The committee saw no fault on the part of the institution itself."
http://www.chronicle.com/weekly/v45/i26/26a04502.htm (password may be required)

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, March 5 -- The Money & Management section's Gifts & Bequests column mentions the patent rights, valued at $35 million, DuPont gave to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.chronicle.com/weekly/v45/i26/26a04001.htm (password may be required)

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, March 5 -- The Money & Management section's Give & Take column discusses the $65 million in patents DuPont donated to three universities, including $35 million in patents to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA RESEARCH FOUNDATION.
http://www.chronicle.com/weekly/v45/i26/26a03803.htm (password may be required)

WASHINGTON POST, March 5 -- RANDALL P. BEZANSON, a law professor at the University of Iowa, is quoted in an article about U.S. Supreme Court Justice Harry Blackmun, who died March 4. Bezanson, who once clerked for Blackmun, said he and Blackmun were greeted by picketers at an Iowa hotel shortly after the justice issued the controversial Roe v. Wade ruling. "That was the first time he understood the consequences in personal terms," Bezanson said.

STATES NEWS SERVICE, March 5 -- A senior at a high school in Davenport who netted a perfect score of 1600 on the Scholastic Aptitude Test hasn't decided yet where he plans to go to college, but he's considering Kansas, Arizona State, and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Tony Langasek was one of fewer than 700 students across the country to reach a perfect score.

PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, March 4 -- William Robinson Bradley, 91, who was recognized as a pioneer and authority in the field of industrial hygiene, died Feb. 27. Bradley attended the STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's COLLEGE OF MEDICINE for two years to study occupational medicine. He also studied toxicology and earned a master's degree in biological sciences at the State University of Iowa.
http://www.phillynews.com/inquirer/99/Mar/04/pa_north/NBRAD04.htm (password may be required)

THE NEWS & OBSERVER (Raleigh, N.C.), March 4 -- INGRID NYGAARD, associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Iowa, conducted a study of 290 female exercisers ages 17 to 68 and found one in three suffered from incontinence during exercise. The story ran Feb. 23 in the WASHINGTON POST.

PROVIDENCE (R.I.) PHOENIX, March 4 -- ROBERT OPPLIGER, an adjunct researcher in the graduate program in physical therapy at the University of Iowa’s College of Medicine, is quoted in a story about the death of a college wrestler in Rhode Island.

DETROIT FREE PRESS, March 3 -- ROGER CEILLEY, assistant professor of dermatology at the University of Iowa and past president of the American Academy of Dermatology, said a new UV Detect camera that shows underlying skin damage caused by the sun's rays probably can't detect skin cancer but "is a valuable instructional tool."
http://www.freep.com/news/health/qskin3.htm (password may be required)

STATES NEWS SERVICE, March 3 -- One of the most generous benefactors for the University of Iowa, the Carver Charitable Trust, has given the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE $3 million to support the work of three biomedical research teams. The gift brings to $27 million the money given to the school by the trust since the early 1980s.

NEW YORK TIMES, March 2 -- Rear Adm. William L. Stubblefield, director of the NOAA Corps, the nation's smallest uniformed service, has retired, according to this Associated Press article. Stubblefield received a master's degree in geology from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran March 2 in the LOS ANGELES TIMES, the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE; and the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE.

BUSINESS WEEK, March 2 -- UI President MARY SUE COLEMAN announced that the school’s College of Business Administration has been promised a $30 million gift from Iowa alumnus Henry B. Tippie.

NATIONAL ENQUIRER, March 2 -- Researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA have found that people who get up early in the morning are happier than those who prefer to sleep late.

FINANCIAL TIMES, March 1 -- The University of Iowa has renamed its business school the HENRY B. TIPPIE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS in recognition of the $30 million donated by Tippie over a number of years.

USA TODAY, March 1 -- Steve Finken, chief editor of Hallmark Cards and a former creative writing student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is quoted in an article on the company's success at creating a creative work environment. Though the Hallmark writers are trained to have thick skins, Finken said their confidence is a delicate thing that can wane from day to day.

NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW, March 1 -- "Riven Rock," a novel by T. Coraghessan Boyle, who received his doctorate in nineteenth-century English literature from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1977, is briefly reviewed.

AMERICAN BABY, March 1999 -- DEBORAH LIN-DYKEN, a pediatric sleep specialist and assistant professor of clinical pediatrics at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, is quoted in an article about infant sleep patterns. "In the first few days, babies are learning how to eat, how to sleep and how to get adjusted to a completely new environment," Lin-Dyken said.

GOOD HEALTH, March 1999 -- A story on allergies cites a 1997 study by the UI DEPARTMENT OF INTERNAL MEDICINE involving 240 subjects. It found that people injected with a mouse antibody showed a decrease in the level of trouble-making antibodies, suggesting that the mouse antibodies "should be an effective therapy for allergic disease."

FACILITIES DESIGN & MANAGEMENT, March 1999 -- A story on the importance of lighting for security reasons on campuses quotes LARRY WILSON, campus planner at the University of Iowa. "Our strategy is to provide at lease one well-lighted route to each campus building," says Wilson.

SELF, March 1999 -- A group of researchers of neurology at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, in a 1997 study, found that when faced with decisions that didn’t feel comfortable on an emotional level, subjects experienced sweating.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The University of Iowa All rights reserved copyright 2006