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UI in the News

July, 1999

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ISPA NEWSLETTER , July/August 1999 -- The 1999-2000 Millennium Festival at the University of Iowa Hancher Auditorium (WALLACE CHAPPELL, VICTOR MASHBURN) will join the worldwide celebration of the millennium with an ambitious event featuring 15 major commissions in music, theater and dance.

INSIDE ARTS, July/August 1999-- HANCHER AUDITORIUM teamed up with public libraries in Iowa City, Cedar Rapids and Lisbon and area churches to conduct an audience development residency with the Colorado String Quartet to increase audiences for chamber music among churchgoers and library-users. About 1,200 people took part in listening and discussion programs.

INSIDE ARTS, July/August 1999-- JUDITH HURTIG, assistant director of Hancher Auditorium, contributed an article to the magazine on the University of Iowa's involvement with the Colorado Quartet for seven weeks in the fall and winter of 1997. Hancher teamed with other local groups to promote interest in string quartet music.

ACADEMIC PHYSICIAN & SCIENTIST, July/August 1999 -- University of Iowa Professor JACK ROSAZZA, head of medicinal and natural products chemistry and director of the Center for Biocatalysis and Bioprocessing, is quoted in an article exploring how academic scientists weigh the benefits of industry-sponsored research. The article mentions the UI's recent receipt of $35 million in patents from the DuPont Company. "Our strength as academic scientists is that we can do creative things that don't necessarily have a dollar tag in areas that might ultimately lead to something useful for patients," Rosazza said.

INTERNATIONAL ARTS MANAGER, July/August 1999 -- WALLACE CHAPPELL of Hancher Auditorium in Iowa City talked with delegates to the 13th annual Congress of the International Society for the Performing Arts about the mechanics of co-producing, commissioning and investment.

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, July 30 -- University of Iowa officials have decided to end negotiations with the Milwaukee-based Miller Brewing Co. for an advertising contract because they say it sends the wrong message about drinking. " I think that this is not something that is consistent with trying to reduce the consumption of alcohol within the student population," ANN RHODES, vice president for university relations, said Wednesday. Also quoted in the Associated Press story is RICK KLATT, Iowa assistant athletic director for external affairs.
http://www.startribune.com/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=0730PM-WI--ALCOHOLAD&date=30-Jul-99&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, July 30 -- University of Iowa officials have decided to end negotiations with the Milwaukee-based Miller Brewing Co. for an advertising contract, because they say it sends the wrong message about drinking. " I think that this is not something that is consistent with trying to reduce the consumption of alcohol within the student population," ANN RHODES, vice president for university relations, said. Also quoted in the Associated Press story is RICK KLATT, Iowa assistant athletic director for external affairs. Another version of the story, which did not quote Rhodes or Klatt, ran Aug. 2 in the OMAHA WORLD-HERALD.

SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, July 30 -- RHAWN DENNISTON, a geology graduate student at the University of Iowa, collected samples during excavation in a Nevada cave where scientists are looking for the remains of meals eaten by prehistoric carnivores. The cave formations, such as stalagmites and stalactites, are much older than any of the animal remains recovered so far, Denniston said in the Associated Press article. "The results are surprising,'' he said. "The bones in the cave were about 45,000 years old but the stalagmites, on average, appear to be much older -- greater than 350,000 years."
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/1999/07/30/state1639EDT0042.DTL

ABC NEWS, July 30 -- BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, a UI professor of sport, health, leisure, and physical studies, participated in a live chat about work and leisure time in American history and in contemporary America. "In the 19th century, leisure was seen to be an integral part of progress. Leisure today has been trivialized and de-valued. It's time to sit on your butt; it's not the best time of your life to express your humanity," he said.
http://chat.abcnews.go.com/chat/chat.dll?room=abc_BNW_Time730

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, July 30 -- Hillary Gardner of Iowa City expresses disappointment about the Chronicle's coverage of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's INTERNATIONAL WRITING PROGRAM in a letter to the editor. She writes that the paper "chose to downplay the program's reputation more than once in the article, ... stating that the program is 'on the skids' and claiming that it has been 'hobbled by its reputation as a home for obscure writers who don't speak English.'"
http://www.chronicle.com/weekly/v45/i47/47b00905.htm

USA TODAY, July 30 -- The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA collected a record $259.5 million in grants, contracts and gifts in the fiscal year that ended June 30, a 19.4 percent increase over the previous year, officials said. Most of the money--$214.9 million--was spent on research. The rest went to fellowships and scholarships, academic support and student financial aid.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/states/iamain.htm

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, July 29 -- A listing of web sites that offer detailed specialty maps includes one produced by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. By linking to http://www.cgrer.uiowa.edu/servers/servers_references.html, people can access a huge index with links to specialized maps of all types, such as hunting, racing, traffic, etc. The site also has digital maps of all of India.

DETROIT NEWS, July 29 -- CARL SCHWESER, a University of Iowa business professor, has joined a growing number of Democrats voting with their checkbooks in the 2000 presidential campaign--and they're sending an unsettling message to Vice President Al Gore. "I guess Bill Bradley has caught my eye as a guy who gets things done," said Schweser, who made his first-ever campaign contribution, $1,000, after hearing the former senator from New Jersey speak at a neighbor's house. "He's certainly not flashy," Schweser added approvingly. "I'm 6-foot-5 myself, and his shirttails hang out just like mine." The article originally appeared in the LOS ANGELES TIMES.

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, July 29 -- A listing of web sites that offer detailed specialty maps includes one produced by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. By linking to http://www.cgrer.uiowa.edu/servers/servers_references.html, people can access a huge index with links to specialized maps of all types, such as hunting, racing, traffic, etc. The site also has digital maps of all of India. The same article appeared July 25 in the ARIZONA REPUBLIC.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, July 28 - CHRISTINE GRANT, UI women's athletic director, says she delivered a depressing message to her staff after reading the 1998 Racial and Gender Report Card compiled by the Center for the Study of Sport in Society at Northeastern University. Only 8.2 percent of Division I athletic directors are women. "I said to them, 'Are you going to have a chance? I'm not sure.' To me the saddest thing about this is that the so-called best educated people in the country are making these hiring decisions."

DETROIT NEWS, July 27 -- The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA 's HARDIN META DIRECTORY -- a site that groups medical links by category and removes them when their connection rate drops -- is included in a list of top health sites that ran with an article about how guidelines and libraries are offering cures for Web confusion. "Researchers say a good connection rate shows that the sponsors are maintaining it -- key as information changes rapidly," the article says.

KANSAS CITY STAR, July 27 -- A listing of web sites that offer detailed specialty maps includes one produced by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. By linking to http://www.cgrer.uiowa.edu/servers/servers_references.html, people can access a huge index with links to specialized maps of all types, such as hunting, racing, traffic, etc. The site also has digital maps of all of India. The article also ran in the July 27 TELEGRAM & GAZETTE (Worcester, Mass.).

MIAMI HERALD, July 26 -- A study by Key Redfield Jamison, who wrote the best-selling ``An Unquiet Mind, " showed a 38 percent incidence of manic depression among students at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, while less than 1 percent of the general population suffers from the disease. The study is cited in a new book titled "Surviving Literary Suicide" by Jeffrey Berman, a State University of New York at Albany professor of English.

REUTERS HEALTH, July 26 -- Attitudes toward the physically disabled vary widely among children, depending on their culture of origin, according to DENNIS C. HARPER, M.D., of the University of Iowa, who also found that youngsters who grow up in close contact with a disabled person have a more positive attitude toward disability in general. The results of Harper's study of more than 1,000 children worldwide were published in a recent issue of the journal REHABILITATION PSYCHOLOGY.
http://www.foxnews.com/js_index.sml?content=/health/wires2/0726/h_rt_0726_11.sml

NEWSDAY, July 25 -- BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, professor of leisure studies at the University of Iowa, is quoted in a story that discusses how people are cutting back on their sleeping to have more leisure time. "It was supposed to be the century of leisure," Hunnicutt said.

WASHINGTON POST, July 25 -- University of Iowa Professor ERNEST PASCARELLA's book "How College Affects Students" is based on 2,600 studies conducted over more than 20 years. He and co-author Patrick Terenzini of Penn State looked at the intellectual skills, the attitudes and values, the psychosocial characteristics, the economic returns, of graduates from various types of colleges. "Taking into account the differences in the kinds of kids they admit," Pascarella concludes, "the typical measures don't show much difference." Even in subsequent careers and incomes, the very benefits the public tends to attribute to selective private universities with brand names, the effects appear modest.
http://search.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/WPlate/1999-07/25/017l-072599-idx.html

NEW YORK TIMES, July 25 -- Henry Ong, a Singaporean playwright based in Los Angeles, left Singapore in 1977 for the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to pursue a journalism career, according to the story on the Singapore art scene. Ong traveled to Singapore on government money to oversee Singapore Rep's festival production of his play "Fabric."
http://www.nytimes.com/yr/mo/day/artleisure/singapore-arts.html

ENQUIRER-LEDGER (Columbus, Ga.), July 25 -- Daniel Taddie, a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is the new chair of the Schwob Department of Music at Columbus State University in Georgia. As a conductor, he has led college choirs on tours throughout the South and was chorus master of the Jackson Symphony Chorus in Tennessee. As a tenor soloist, he performed with the Knoxville Opera Company.
http://www.l-e-o.com/news/0725newmusic.htm

SAN JOSE (Calif.) MERCURY NEWS, July 24 -- A study by Key Redfield Jamison, who wrote the best-selling ``An Unquiet Mind, " showed a 38 percent incidence of manic depression among students at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, while less than 1 percent of the general population suffers from the disease. The study is cited in a new book titled "Surviving Literary Suicide" by Jeffrey Berman, a State University of New York at Albany professor of English.
http://www.sjmercury.com/premium/svlife/docs/suicide24.htm

SAN FRANCISCO EXAMINER, July 23 -- Author Gina Berriault, who won the National Book Critics Circle Award and PEN / Faulkner Prize in 1997 and taught at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, died last week after a brief illness at the age of 73. She recently had completed a fable, "The Great Petrowski," to be published with her own illustrations.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/examiner/archive/1999/07/23/WEEKEND15208.dtl

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, July 23 -- The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA ranked 10th among public colleges and universities that were earmarked in 1999 to receive the most "pork barrel" dollars from Congress, with nearly $9.3 million in individual grants and $4.6 million in shared grants. The UI did not rank at all among the top 25 "pork" recipients for the years 1995 to 1999 combined. Nationally for the 1999 fiscal year, Congress earmarked specific spending measures that included at least $797 million for such projects, according to an analysis by The Chronicle. That's a rise of 51 percent over last year's total of $528 million.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v45/i46/46toppork99.htm

UPI, July 22 -- A group of UNIVERSITY OF IOWA SCHOOL OF BUSINESS professors has established an Iowa Electronic Market (IEM) for the New York senatorial race between New York City Mayor Rudolph Giuliani and first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton. The public can access www.biz.uiowa.edu/iem and buy shares in their preferred candidate at $1 a share, with a five-share minimum. Besides being fun for the participants, it is designed to teach students the intricacies of the commodities futures markets. The article ran on the UPI wire's ``On the Net" feature page.
http://www.marketwatch.newsalert.com/bin/story?StoryId=Cn5AxqbebDtm0ntu&FQ=%22University%20of%20Iowa%22&ED=last+week&Title=Headlines%20for%3A%20%22University%20of%20Iowa%22%0A

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, July 22 -- University of Iowa Athletic Director BOB BOWLSBY says Proposition 48, a forerunner of Proposition 16 (which raised academic standards for college athletes), "brought a better-qualified student-athlete to campus. The public loses sight of that on game day. We all want to win. We all want to go to the Final Four or a bowl game. But we represent academic institutions."
http://chicagotribune.com/sports/main/article/0,2669,SAV-9907220120,FF.html

NANDO TIMES (North Carolina), July 21 -- The significance of the nonbinding Ames straw poll, where 10,000 to 14,000 Iowans will declare their preference for a GOP nominee, is "entirely unprecedented," says ARTHUR MILLER, a political analyst at the University of Iowa. "Normally everyone sees this as simply an early test of how the Republicans are doing in getting their campaigns off the ground," says Miller. "Now it's become a test of George W. Bush, and how organized he is here."
http://www.nando.com/noframes/story/0,2107,72576-114730-814891-0,00.html

WAMC RADIO (New York), July 21 -- A website at the University of Iowa gives those with some political knowledge and a yen for fiscal adventure a chance to buy shares on the outcome of next year's New York Senate race. For as little as $5, investors can buy shares for First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton or New York City Mayor Rudolph Giuliani. WAMC's Leah Fleming spoke to BOB FORSYTHE, senior associate dean at the Henry B. Tippie College of Business at the University of Iowa, who says that this exercise provides his students with great hands-on experience in the growing business of online trading. After the election, shares of the winning candidate will be worth one dollar each. The losing candidate's shares will be worthless. The ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran July 21 on the MSNBC web site:
http://www.msnbc.com/local/WNBC/467385.asp
The same article appeared July 20 on the CBS web site:
http://www.cbs.com/flat/story_170109.html

ARKANSAS DEMOCRAT-GAZETTE, July 21 -- The retired director of the University of Arkansas' creative writing program said Tuesday that a $1 million gift from the Walton Family Foundation will keep the program one of the best in the country for young writers. Jim Whitehead, who helped found the program in 1966, said the gift will help Arkansas keep pace with the biggest names in creative writing, including the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor, and Columbia University.

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR, July 21 -- The significance of the nonbinding Ames straw poll, where 10,000 to 14,000 Iowans will declare their preference for a GOP nominee, is "entirely unprecedented," says ARTHUR MILLER, a political analyst at the University of Iowa. "Normally everyone sees this as simply an early test of how the Republicans are doing in getting their campaigns off the ground," says Miller. "Now it's become a test of George W. Bush, and how organized he is here."
http://www.csmonitor.com/durable/1999/07/21/text/p3s1.html

SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER, July 21 -- FRANK CONROY, author of the memoir "Stop-Time" and director of the University of Iowa Writers' Workshop, says Ernest Hemingway became an icon largely because he wanted to be one. "Well, he asked for it, didn't he?" Conroy said. "Hemingway was absolutely outrageous, the way he lived. He tried to be this big, burly guy who wasn't afraid of anything, and it turns out he had feet of clay."
http://www.seattlep-i.com:80/books/erne21.shtml

CONGRESS DAILY (a daily newsletter published on the Web by the National Journal), July 21 -- ROBERT FORSYTHE, a co- founder of the Iowa Electronic Markets and an associate dean at the Tippie College of Business at the University of Iowa, said the IEM is "a wonderful way to have a widespread experiment to study market behavior. Plus, it's fun." The IEM has offered investment opportunities in a handful of races since its founding in 1988, including the 1996 presidential election, when 7,000 investors wagered $250,000.

THE HOTLINE (a daily newsletter published on the Web by the National Journal), July 20 -- Pundits who want to wager on the outcome of the 2000 New York Senate race between Rudy Giuliani and First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton can buy shares of either candidate or others -- through the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS (IEM), a Web site established by the University of Iowa.

BOSTON GLOBE, July 20 -- ROBERT FORSYTHE, a co-founder of the Iowa Electronic Markets (IEM) and an associate dean at the Tippie College of Business at the University of Iowa, says the IEM is "a wonderful way to have a widespread experiment to study market behavior." Plus," Forsythe adds, "It's fun." The IEM allows investors to purchase shares of stock tied to various political races, including the presidential election. The ASSOCIATED PRESS article originated July 20 from the ROCHESTER (N.Y.) DEMOCRAT AND CHRONICLE and on the July 21 WALL STREET JOURNAL web site:
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve.cgi?id=SB932512321339279529.djm
The same article appeared July 21 on the MSNBC web site:
http://www.msnbc.com/local/WNBC/467385.asp
The same article appeared July 20 on the CBS web site:
http://www.cbs.com/flat/story_170109.html

NEWSDAY, July 20 -- ROBERT FORSYTHE, a co-founder of the Iowa Electronic Markets (IEM) and an associate dean at the Tippie College of Business at the University of Iowa, says the IEM is "a wonderful way to have a widespread experiment to study market behavior. Plus," Forsythe adds, "It's fun." The IEM allows investors to purchase shares of stock tied to various political races, including the presidential election. The ASSOCIATED PRESS article is attributed to the ROCHESTER (N.Y.) DEMOCRAT AND CHRONICLE, which wrote the story and ran it on its web site at:
http://www.RochesterNews.com/0720senaterace.html

LOS ANGELES TIMES, July 20 -- CARL SCHWESER, a University of Iowa business professor, has joined a growing number of Democrats voting with their checkbooks in the 2000 presidential campaign--and they're sending an unsettling message to Vice President Al Gore. "I guess Bill Bradley has caught my eye as a guy who gets things done," said Schweser, who made his first-ever campaign contribution, $1,000, after hearing the former senator from New Jersey speak at a neighbor's house. "He's certainly not flashy," Schweser added approvingly. "I'm 6-foot-5 myself, and his shirttails hang out just like mine."

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, July 20 -- Iowa wrestling icon DAN GABLE is the subject of a feature-length documentary titled "Gable" that was shot on videotape by independent filmmakers with Shadow Bird Productions and the University of Iowa Video Center. The video tells what happened to Gable when he was 15 years old and his 19-year-old sister, Diane, was murdered in 1964. Gable went on to win an Olympic gold medal, compiled a 181-1 high school record in Waterloo, Iowa, and at Iowa State University, then coached the University of Iowa to wrestling dominance with 15 national championships, including nine in a row from 1978 to 1986. Gable retired after the 1997 season, during which the documentary was shot.
http://chicagotribune.com/version1/article/0,1575,ART-31863,00.html

BUSINESS WEEK, July 19 -- Marianthi Markatou, a 39-year-old statistician at Columbia University who once taught at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, accepted Iowa Gov. Tom Vilsack's invitation to émigrés to dine on Iowa beef and Maytag blue cheese during a recent get-together in New York's Central Park. But she declined his invitation to return to Iowa. "Iowa has a nice, interesting environment," she said. "But more opportunities come your way in New York or California."

U.S. NEWS & WORLD REPORT, July 19 -- Three medical specialties at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS (UIHC) are considered among the top 10 in the United States and another seven specialties are in a group of the best 50, according to the 1999 annual survey of the nation's best hospitals released by the magazine.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, July 19 -- "Not About Nightingales," a play written by Tennessee Williams when he was attending the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1938, earned actor Corin Redgrave -- one of England's most admired stage actors --an American Tony nomination for his role as a vile prison warden. The newly discovered play was produced for the first time on Broadway during the just-closed season.
http://chicagotribune.com/leisure/features/article/0,2669,SAV-9907190170,FF.html

DRUG TOPICS, July 19 -- RONALD M. JONES, M.D., department of pathology at the University of Iowa School of Medicine and lead investigator of the Sentry Surveillance Program, comments on the Sentry program's tracking of infectious-disease pathogens. The group found that the rate of penicillin resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae continues to increase, from less than 4 percent in the 1980s to almost 40 percent currently. "With S. pneumoniae the most prevalent respiratory tract infection, we concur with a recent World Health Organization report calling for the development of newer antibiotics, as well as more appropriate use of currently available antibiotics," Jones said.

DISABILITY FUNDING NEWS, July 19 -- PETER BLANCK, a University of Iowa law professor, is quoted in a story about how technology is providing more employment opportunities for disabled workers. Manpower "thinks there are no unskilled workers," Blanck says about the temporary employment company that expects the "temp" market to grow by 55 percent by 2005. "This growth will be driven mostly by new technology," Blanck says. Blanck also comments about his landmark research on the effectiveness of the Americans with Disabilities Act, where Manpower's labor force was thoroughly examined. Blanck says the cost of companies providing accommodations for 600 disabled people is low -- roughly $30. "The cost of not making such accommodations is much higher," Blanck says.

THE STATE (Columbia, S.C.), July 18 -- An Associated Press computer analysis found that 11.8 percent of Republican presidential hopeful and Texas Gov. George W. Bush's itemized individual contributions in the latest reporting period came from people who had given to his father in 1988 or 1992. ARTHUR MILLER, director of the Iowa Social Science Institute at the University of Iowa, said the percentage is significant enough to suggest family loyalty. "He is drawing upon the same constituency that his father drew upon, despite the fact that one of the messages he is trying to convey to the broader public is that he is reaching out beyond the normal sorts of people that the Republicans would normally draw into their support groups," Miller said.

NEW YORK DAILY NEWS, July 18 -- Researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA DENTAL SCHOOL found that people who agreed to eat cheddar cheese four times a day for two weeks had a 20 percent buildup in protective minerals on the surface of synthetic toothlike material that had been attached to the roots of their natural teeth. The researchers theorize that the cheese protects teeth by neutralizing acid made by cavity-causing bacteria.

LOS ANGELES TIMES, July 18 -- FRANK CONROY, author of the memoir "Stop-Time" and director of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, says Ernest Hemingway became an icon largely because he wanted to be one. "Well, he asked for it, didn't he?" Conroy said. "Hemingway was absolutely outrageous, the way he lived. He tried to be this big, burly guy who wasn't afraid of anything, and it turns out he had feet of clay."

DALLAS MORNING NEWS, July 17 -- Some political analysts say that Lamar Alexander, along with others running again for the GOP nomination, fails to excite the passion of supporters. "They' re has-beens, " said ARTHUR MILLER, director of the Iowa Social Science Institute at the University of Iowa. "They're not the new kid on the block and they' re not getting people excited."
http://www.dallasnews.com:80/national/0717nat7alex.htm

CHICAGO SUN-TIMES, July 17 -- A Riverwoods, Ill., businessman who has builtan empire with strobe lights for cars, key chains, pets, bicycles and lapels, graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and planned to eventually work at his father's Loop law firm. But he quit law school for an entry-level job at Montgomery Ward.

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, July 17 -- An Associated Press computer analysis found that 11.8 percent of Republican presidential hopeful and Texas Gov. George W. Bush's itemized individual contributions in the latest reporting period came from people who had given to his father in 1988 or 1992. ARTHUR MILLER, director of the Iowa Social Science Institute at the University of Iowa, said the percentage is significant enough to suggest family loyalty. "He is drawing upon the same constituency that his father drew upon, despite the fact that one of the messages he is trying to convey to the broader public is that he is reaching out beyond the normal sorts of people that the Republicans would normally draw into their support groups," Miller said. The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article appeared July 17 on the NANDO TIMES (North Carolina) web site:
http://www2.nando.net:80/noframes/story/0,2107,71330-112781-800803-0,00.html
The same Associated Press article appeared July 17 on the NEW YORK TIMES web site:
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/p/AP-Bush-Funds.html
The same Associated Press article appeared July 17 on the WASHINGTON POST web site:
http://search.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/WAPO/19990717/V000200-071799-idx.html

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, July 16 -- Some political analysts say that Lamar Alexander, along with others running again for the GOP nomination, fails to excite the passion of supporters. "They' re has-beens, " said ARTHUR MILLER, director of the Iowa Social Science Institute at the University of Iowa. "They're not the new kid on the block and they're not getting people excited." The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article appeared July 16 on the NEW YORK TIMES web site:
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/p/AP-Alexander-2000.html
The same Associated Press article appeared July 16 on the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE web site:
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/1999/07/16/politics1352EDT0631.DTL

DETROIT FREE PRESS, July 16 -- University of Southern California professor Todd Boyd, who received his Ph.D. from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, has collaborated with a former student to produce a film called "The Wood," a comedy about growing up in the middle-class suburb of Inglewood, Calif.
http://www.freep.com:80/fun/movies/qrick16.htm

PITTSBURGH POST-GAZETTE, July 16 -- Playwright Keith Josef Adkins, whose play "Wilberforce" is being produced for the Carnegie Mellon University Summer New Plays Project, attended the prestigious UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP. "That's a great place to write because there's nothing else to do but focus on your own world, to create something original," Adkins said. "Wilberforce" is about the first African-American college.
http://www.post-gazette.com:80/magazine/19990716cmu7.asp

USA TODAY, July 14 -- The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's HARDIN META DIRECTORY -- a site that groups medical links by category and removes them when their connection rate drops -- is included in a list of top health sites that ran with an article about how guidelines and libraries are offering cures for Web confusion. "Researchers say a good connection rate shows that the sponsors are maintaining it -- key as information changes rapidly," the article says.

DETROIT FREE PRESS, July 13 -- A profile of Gateway Inc. founder Ted Waitt mentions that he dropped out of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1985 to piece together PCs in a barn on his dad's South Dakota cattle ranch.
http://www.freep.com:80/tech/qtchk13.htm
The same article also appeared July 12 in THE (Bergen, N.J.) RECORD:
http://www.bergen.com:80/biz/gateway12199907122.htm

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, July 14 -- University of Iowa Athletic Director BOB BOWLSBY said the Big Ten Conference has no plans to expand. "If a meeting of the minds is happening, I haven’t heard," he said.

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, July 14 -- University of Iowa dermatologist MARY STONE says that many of the patients she treats for acne are in their 20s, 30s, 40s and even 50s, not just between 12 and 20. "There's this myth that acne evaporates at age 21. But it doesn't," Stone said.
http://www.startribune.com/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=BURC14&date=14-Jul-99&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

WALL STREET JOURNAL, July 13 -- CARL BENDORF of the University of Iowa Foundation said the UI recently declined an offer of 97 percent of a limited partnership holding farmland worth $1 million because of concerns about its compliance with IRS rules. The plan was for the farm to be sold and the proceeds to be held by the partnership. Though the agreement called for net income to be distributed to all owners, the plan disclosed that the charity's portion would be "very modest" after the general partner took out his expenses and management fees. "We're not sure how charitable this is," Bendorf said. "We don't like to look a gift horse in the mouth, but we couldn't give it our stamp of approval."
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve.cgi?id=SB931819656115209655.djm

DESERET NEWS (Utah), July 12 -- Former state historian LOREN HORTON, now on the faculty at the University of Iowa, comments on the recent discovery of paths in Iowa of wagons where thousands of Mormons came and continued on to Utah 150 years ago. Horton said the first 3,000 or so pioneers hit the trail Feb. 4, 1846. By April 24 of that year, the first group had reached Garden Grove in south central Iowa.
http://deseretnews.com:80/dn/view/1,1249,100010746,00.html

WASHINGTON POST, July 12 -- The adviser to a Lynn Haven, Fla., high school student newspaper that recently won a first-place award from the Quill and Scroll -- the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's honorary journalism society -- has been fired for encouraging the staff to conduct, in her words, "an open forum for student expression." Actor Paul Newman and his business partner, writer A.E. Hotchner, presented the adviser a $25,000 award for defending the First Amendment. The award is given annually to "an American resident who has fought courageously, despite adversity, to safeguard the First Amendment right to freedom of expression as it applies to the written word."

WALL STREET JOURNAL, July 12 -- DONALD W. BLACK, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, is quoted in an article about how the Internet increases the temptation to spend money compulsively. "You can draw parallels to gambling," says Black. "As gambling spread and became more readily available, the number of identified problem gamblers has shot up. It's a very good analogy."
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve.cgi?id=SB931479291753453632.djm

FINANCIAL REVIEW, July 12 -- A profile of Gateway Inc. founder Ted Waitt mentions that he dropped out of the University of Iowa in 1985 to piece together PCs in a barn on his dad's South Dakota cattle ranch.
http://www.afr.com.au:80/content/990712/inform/inform8.html

SAN JOSE (Calif.) MERCURY NEWS, July 12 -- Patricia Albers, who recently completed a biography of silent film star, photographer and revolutionary Tina Modotti titled "Shadows, Fire, Snow: The Life of Tina Modotti," was an undergraduate art student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.

DENVER ROCKY MOUNTAIN NEWS, July 12 -- The adviser to a Lynn Haven, Fla., high school student newspaper that recently won a first-place award from the QUILL AND SCROLL -- the University of Iowa's honorary journalism society -- has been fired for encouraging the staff to conduct, in her words, "an open forum for student expression." Actor Paul Newman and his business partner, writer A.E. Hotchner, presented the adviser a $25,000 award for defending the First Amendment. The award is given annually to "an American resident who has fought courageously, despite adversity, to safeguard the First Amendment right to freedom of expression as it applies to the written word.

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH, July 11 -- DAVID FORKENBROCK, director of the Public Policy Center at the University of Iowa, helped put together a 1997 study which projected that passenger vehicles will pay 10 percent more in federal gasoline taxes than the damage they do to the pavement. On the other hand, over-the-road commercial tractor-trailers generally cause more damage than what their fees and taxes can cover, the study said. "If they paid their fair share, it would kill the trucking industry," Forkenbrock said.

SEATTLE TIMES, July 11 -- A review of the book "A Community of Writers: Paul Engle and the Iowa WRITERS' WORKSHOP," published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, says the stamp the workshop has put on North American cultural and intellectual life is comparable to the influence of Oxford and Cambridge Universities on the British literary tradition. "If you think I am being liberal with my ink pad, you need only check the list of fiction writers, poets, essayists and memoirists who studied or taught at Iowa," says the author. "The very word 'workshop,' which is now common parlance in our literary lexicon, was planted in the Iowa cornfields."

LOS ANGELES TIMES, July 11 -- RANDELL ALEXANDER is a pediatric specialist who while at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics worked closely with the state medical examiner in an alleged shaken-baby homicide case that has divided the medical community in Iowa. Some doctors say medical examiners who are advocates for children cannot objectively diagnose suspicious causes of death in children. But Alexander disagrees. "You can argue all you want," he says. "Meanwhile, the child is in my ER with broken bones."

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, July 9 - A growing number of scholars, including DORIS WITT, a UI assistant professor of English, are interested in the historical, social, and cultural meanings of food. "Food underwrites ongoing debates about the substance and boundaries of American personhood," Witt said at a recent conference on the topic. Witt, who became interested in African-American culinary history after she noticed how central it was to the work of contemporary black female writers, has just published "Black Hunger: Food and the Politics of U.S. Identity" (Oxford University Press).
http://chronicle.com/free/v45/i44/44a00101.htm

THE (U.K.) TIMES LITERARY SUPPLEMENT, July 9 -- University of Iowa American Studies Professor RICHARD P. HORWITZ's book "Hog Ties" gets a favorable, one-page review in the paper. The review was one of four featured on the cover of the paper's "Cultural Studies" issue. The book -- about farming, pigs and disease in American culture -- is described as "an eccentric song of praise to all things porcine, a portrait of the internecine warfare that often attends scholarly research on American campuses, a compendium of information on transmissible gastroenteritis and a showcase for Horwitz's beguiling essayistic style."

MEDTRIB.COM, July 8 -- MILES M. WEINBERGER, a pediatrician at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, was the senior author of a study that found some children diagnosed with exercise-induced asthma may actually suffer from hyperventilation. The same article ran in the July 9 CHICAGO SUN-TIMES.

NEW YORK TIMES, July 8 -- A feature on Robert Homma, a partner in a New York shop that sells Ming furniture, celadon porcelain and rare live birds, says that in the 1970s he studied painting at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.

SEATTLE TIMES, July 8 -- Veteran broadcast journalist Bob Steele, who earned his Ph.D. in journalism ethics at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is the author of an opinion piece on the personal and professional challenges journalists face when covering tragic events. Steele is currently director of the ethics programs at The Poynter Institute, a school for journalists in St. Petersburg, Fla.

NEW YORK TIMES, July 8 -- An article about interesting Web sites about human anatomy mentions one at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA devoted to anatomy of the brain, the most difficult of any part of the body to visualize. The story says neuroanatomists at the UI have put together a set of detailed photographs of sections of the human brain with schematic drawings that allow each structure to be identified. The result is the equivalent of a very good textbook of brain anatomy. The site itself is at: www.vh.org/Providers/Textbooks/BrainAnatomy/BrainAnatomy.html

FOXSPORTS.COM, July 7 -- Steve Rubin, an amateur from Barrington, Ill., and competitor in the U.S. Senior Open in Des Moines, attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The fact is mentioned in an article about golfers in the tournament who have Iowa connections. http://www.foxsports.com:80/js_index.frm?content=/wires/pages/72/spt134572.sml

The article also ran July 7 in the SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, MSNBC and on the NEW YORK TIMES site at:
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/s/AP-GLF-Senior-Open-Notebook.html

SEATTLE TIMES, July 6 -- University of Iowa antitrust professor HERB HOVENKAMP, a consultant to the government in its antitrust case against Microsoft, is quoted in an article about the many visits paid to the software giant by presidential candidates in recent weeks. The article says that the next president would have the power to pull the plug on the litigation or cut an out-of-court settlement with Microsoft. But Hovenkamp says that would smack of a political payoff. "If anything, the government is doing extremely well, and you don't drop a case you are winning, even if you thought it was improperly brought," he said.

NEW YORK TIMES, July 5 -- A profile of American author Nathan Englander says that he was admitted to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS’ WORKSHOP and "plunged into writing fiction."

HARTFORD (Conn.) COURANT, July 3 - In a column speculating about who might be chosen for vice president on the 2000 Democratic ticket, ARTHUR MILLER, a UI professor of political science, discounts Massachusetts Senator John Kerry as "too liberal." The columnist suggests Joe Lieberman, the senator from Connecticut, would be a logical choice.

OTTAWA (Canada) CITIZEN, July 3 -- ARNOLD ANDERSEN, director of the Eating Disorders Unit at the University of Iowa, says he finds it fascinating how extremely thin, bony women can be considered attractive. "When you see them during examination, they are skeletons for hanging expensive clothes on. It's extraordinary that people can be convinced they're glamorous."

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, July 2 -- Stanley Fish, the University of Illinois at Chicago's new dean of liberal arts and sciences, has persuaded University of Iowa economist DEIRDRE N. MCCLOSKEY to teach there this fall. But he hopes to make the temporary appointment permanent. The former Donald McCloskey, who caused a stir several years ago after deciding to become a woman, will spend a semester in Chicago teaching a graduate workshop titled "Bourgeois Virtue."
http://www.chronicle.com/weekly/v45/i43/43a03901.htm

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, July 2 -- Howard Singerman, an assistant professor of art history at the University of Virginia, discusses the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in a Q&A article about his new book, "Art Subjects: Making Artists in the American University." Asked whether Abstract Expressionism would have happened without university art training, Singerman responds: "Yes, but it would not have been the movement it was if not for the economic and cultural field that the university provided for that work. Where the universities make their difference is in the mid-to-late 1950s, when the second generation comes, out of places like Rutgers and the University of Iowa."
http://www.chronicle.com/weekly/v45/i43/43a02001.htm

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, July 2 -- Jay R. Howard and JOHN M. STRECK, a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Iowa, have authored a new book exploring the origins and nature of Christian music genre. The book, titled "Apostles of Rock: The Splintered World of Contemporary Christian Music, is due out this month from the University Press of Kentucky. The authors argue that debates over "authenticity," and which musicians truly define the genre, are more intense in Christian music because of the artists' deeply held beliefs.
http://www.chronicle.com/weekly/v45/i43/43a01804.htm

OB. GYN. NEWS, July 1 -- BARCEY T. LEVY, associate professor in the UI College of Medicine, led a study on the impact of paracervical blocks on umbilical artery pH levels at birth. The findings were reported at a meeting of the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine.

DETROIT NEWS, July 1 - University of Iowa quarterback RANDY REINERS will likely face suspension after his second alcohol-related arrest in 18 months. Reiners was arrested for public intoxication June 29 after being found "sleeping or passed out" in a university parking lot. UI Men's Athletics Director BOB BOWLSBY said when athletes violate alcohol policies a second time, it normally involves a suspension, counseling and mandatory abuse class. ANN RHODES, vice president for university relations, said, "In cases involving drinking or substance use, I like to try and balance the treatment component with the sanction component. At this point, I don't know how that's all going to work out yet." (This ASSOCIATED PRESS article was also printed in the June 30 SPORTING NEWS and was posted June 30 on ESPN.COM.)
http://detnews.com:80/1999/college/9907/04/07010042.htm

HARTFORD (Conn.) COURANT, July 1 - The compacted primary season for the 2000 election will make it difficult for any candidate to raise enough money to challenge Texas Gov. George W. Bush's bid for the Republican nomination. Bush's campaign has already raised $36.25 million, double the amount raised by Vice President Al Gore. "Even if someone makes a good showing in Iowa or New Hampshire, they will not have time to raise enough to challenge someone like Bush," said CARY COVINGTON, a UI associate professor of political science.

UROLOGY TIMES, July 1999 -- TIMOTHY L. RATLIFF, Ph.D., of the University of Iowa, reports in an article discussions about basic urology science that took place during the urologist conference in Dallas.

HEALTH DATA MANAGEMENT, July 1999 -- GEORGE BERGUS, M.D., an associate professor of family medicine at the University of Iowa, says he has developed an e-mail consultation service that links his department's family physicians and residents with specialists throughout the university. Each caregiver's e-mail software is programmed with mailing lists for the various medical specialties. "Before we had this service, not everyone was aware of how much expertise we had on campus or knew who to contact if they had questions in specific areas," Bergus said.

THE FEMALE PATIENT, July 1999 -- PATRICIA DAVIS, M.D., an associate professor in the neurology department at the University of Iowa Medical Center, said that when someone has a stroke, the brain is deprived of oxygen and nutrients that it needs. "At first, only a small part of the brain is irreversibly damaged, but as time goes on the irreversible damage spreads."

FOODSERVICE DIRECTOR, July 1999 -- GREG BLACK, food service director at the University of Iowa, says that chicken is the most popular food item for catered banquets. "Our customers like it fried, but there's growing support for broiled or grilled with sauce on the side, particularly honey-mustard and bbq."

DAEDALUS, Summer 1999 -- In the summer issue of Daedalus, WILLARD L. "SANDY" BOYD, president emeritus of the Field Museum and of the University of Iowa, looks at the debate over how museums have collected and displayed objects. The article is part of a series of stories titled "Crossroads for American Museums," which says that American museums are more popular -- and more controversial -- than ever. Mention of Boyd's article appeared in a daily digest e-mailed to subscribers of the CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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