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CONTACT: PETER ALEXANDER
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Iowa City IA 52242
(319) 384-0072; fax (319) 384-0024
e-mail: peter-alexander@uiowa.edu

Release: Immediate

UI CAMPUS NOTES -- IOWA CENTER FOR THE ARTS

ARTHUR GOLDEN READS AT SHAMBAUGH AUDITORIUM MARCH 1-- Novelist

Arthur Golden will read from his debut novel, "Memoirs of a Geisha," at 8 p.m. Monday, March 1, in Shambaugh Auditorium in the University of Iowa Main Library. The reading, which is part of the "Live from Prairie Lights" series originating on radio station WSUI, AM 910, is free and open to the public.

The Washington Post calls Golden's first novel, "Astonishing . . . a breathtaking performance . . . By the time you realize the extent of [the geisha's] professional skill, you are seduced as completely as any of her clients, hungry for her story."

"'Memoirs of a Geisha' [is] not only a richly sympathetic portrait of a woman, but a finely observed picture of an anomalous and largely vanished world . . . An impressive and unusual debut."

Golden, who has received master's degrees in both Japanese art and history, and has lived in Beijing and Tokyo, currently resides in Brookline, Mass.

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LESLIE PIETRZYK READS AT PRAIRIE LIGHTS MARCH 2 -- Iowa City native Leslie Pietrzyk will read from her first novel, "Pears on a Willow Tree," at 8 p.m. Tuesday, March 2, in the Prairie Lights bookstore, 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City. The reading, which is part of the "Live from Prairie Lights" series originating on radio station WSUI, AM 910, is free and open to the public.

Critic Hilma Wolitzer, a former faculty member of the University of Iowa Writers' Workshop, says Pietrzyk's new book "is a powerful and tender-hearted novel of family love, of the strains and bonds of a shared history."

"Ms. Pietrzyk's prose is clean, strong, evocative, judicious and precise. I admire her ability to deliver her characters in fullness, without any tricks and without cheating their great dignity," says writer Richard Bausch, a workshop alumnus.

Pietrzyk's fiction has been published in numerous literary journals, including TriQuarterly, the Iowa Review and the Gettysburg Review. She lives in Alexandria, Va., where she is the director of communications at an area Chamber of Commerce.

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PERSPECTIVES, MARCH 3 -- Linda McIntyre, University of Iowa program associate and computer expert, will demonstrate the newly completed interactive CD-ROM "Art and Life in Africa," at 12:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 3, in the UI Museum of Art.

This presentation, which is part of the museum's weekly Perspectives series, is open to the public free of charge.

"Art and Life in Africa," created by McIntyre and UI art faculty member Christopher Roy, includes more than 10,000 images, using text, objects, field photos, video and music to explore the cycle of life as represented in African art.

CD users can staffs, bowls, jewelry, clothing, stools, figurines and drums, among many other African art objects.

Thirty-six scholars world-wide have contributed to this CD's field essay section, and more than half of its 650 objects are from the UI Museum of Art's Stanley collection.

McIntyre said, "Professor Roy and I originally designed this CD for use by college students, but later decided to expand it so that it would be accessible to all age levels and anyone interested in African art. The wonderful thing about this CD is that it contains more images than can possibly be on view at one time in any museum. It's a great resource for teachers, or for anyone who just wants to sit home and browse through it."

M.C. Ginsberg Objects of Art, Inc. of Iowa City is the corporate sponsor for the 1998-99 Perspectives series at the UI Museum of Art, through the University of Iowa Foundation.

The UI Museum of Art, located on North Riverside Drive in Iowa City, is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. the day of McIntyre's talk. Admission is free. Public metered parking is available in UI parking lots across from the museum on Riverside Drive and just north of the museum.

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MARLY SWICK TO READ AT PRAIRIE LIGHTS MARCH 3 -- Novelist Marly Swick will read from her new novel "Evening News" at 8 p.m. Wednesday, March 3, at the Prairie Lights bookstore, 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City. The reading, co-sponsored by the University of Iowa Writers' Workshop, is free and open to the public.

Pulitzer Prize-winner Robert Olen Butler, a graduate of the UI Department of Theatre Arts, calls Swick's latest "a novel of rare power and profound importance."

"[Swick's] prose defines an intricate emotional landscape, a precision that in itself produces a kind of thrill," a critique in the New York Times Book Review observed.

Swick is the author of a novel, "Paper Wings," and two collections of short stories, "Monogamy," and "The Summer Before the Summer of Love." She lives and teaches in Lincoln, Neb.

The reading will be broadcast live on radio stations WSUI Am 910 and WOI AM 640 as part of the "Live from Prairie Lights" series.

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PETER CAREY READS AT PRAIRIE LIGHTS MARCH 4 -- Booker Prize-winner Peter Carey will read from his new novel, "Jack Maggs," at 8 p.m. Thursday, March 4, in the Prairie Lights bookstore, 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City. The reading, which will be broadcast live on radio stations WSUI AM 910 and WOI AM 640, is free and open to the public.

The Times (London) says that in his new book, "Carey has attempted something new again: taking another's invented world -- that of Charles Dickens -- and turning it in his hand like a prism to cast a new light."

"Anybody who cares at all for fiction should not miss it," Literary Review has asserted.

Born in Bacchus Marsh, Australia, in 1943, Peter Carey is the author of a collection of short stories and five other novels, including the Booker Prize-winning "Oscar and Lucinda."

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UI GALLERY SERIES PRESENTS GENET'S 'THE MAIDS' MARCH 4-7 -- The University Theatres Gallery series will present "The Maids" by Jean Genet at 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday, March 4-6, and at 3 p.m. Sunday, March 7.

Genet's script portrays two sisters who attempt to escape their drab existence as servants by creating and inhabiting their private, increasingly distorted fantasy world.

"'The Maids' is like an entrance into a labyrinth of illusions," explains director Cheryl L. Kaplan, a student in the UI Department of Theatre Arts. "Genet does not approach this play directly, but rather sets the mood of the play through inference or implication, merely suggesting themes but never setting clairvoyant paths of meaning to be followed.

"'The Maids' unfolds and overlaps within itself like a mirrored maze, where one cannot always decipher what is real and what is a reflection. With this question of what is real and what is fake, Genet's writing reveals that theater is the ultimate phoniness, but it can also tell the ultimate truth."

Genet's view of life was molded by an early life spent in correctional institutions and prisons. Both his manipulations of theatrical forms and his poetic language made him an influence far beyond 20th-century French theater. "The Maids," which premiered in 1947 and was mounted in New York in the mid-'50s, was his first produced play.

The Gallery production features costumes by Danielle Bryant, sound by Lindsay Kem, lighting by Kelly PerkinsSmith, and dramaturgical assistance by Ansa Akyea and Kristen Gandrow.

Akyea, Gandrow and Kaplan have brought Bernard Frechtman's British translation into the American vernacular.

Tickets will be $5 ($3 for UI students, senior citizens and youth) at the door.

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LECTURE ON HAITIAN POPULAR MUSIC MARCH 5 -- Gage Averill, the chair of the music department at Wesleyan University in Connecticut, will speak on "The Politics of 'Authenticity' in Haitian Popular Music," at 1:30 p.m., Friday, March 5, in Room 1027 of the Voxman Music Building on the University of Iowa campus.

Averill's lecture, which is part of the Colloquium series sponsored by the musicology area of the UI School of Music, will be free and open to the public.

Averill explains that his lecture will "examine how a series of social and political movements in 20th-century Haiti defined and refined a notion of 'authenticity' in musical performance. I believe that this process has been central to the stylistic development of Haitian popular music and that the political agendas of the movements evoking 'authenticity' have shifted radically over time. Finally, I think that this process has implications for musical study throughout the African diaspora."

Averill holds a doctorate in ethnomusicology from University of Washington. He taught at Wesleyan for several years and is now chair of the music department there. Averill, who speaks Haitian Creole, has worked extensively in Haiti and was a member of the elections monitoring group for the Haitian presidential elections when Jean-Baptise Aristide was chosen president.

Averill has also played Irish music professionally in Madison, Wis., and has led steel bands and Haitian rara music ensembles. He had a regular column on Haitian music in the world music magazine The Beat for many years and has been involved in several recording projects of Haitian folk and popular music. His book, "A Day for the Hunter, A Day for the Prey: Popular Music and Power in Haiti" appeared in 1997.

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ART OF THE MONTH, MARCH 6 -- Missy Gaido Allen, a doctoral candidate in the University of Iowa School of Art and Art History, will speak on "Breaking Away: 20th-Century Europe and American Sculpture," at 10 a.m. Saturday, March 6 in the UI Museum of Art.

This presentation is the second in the museum's current four part mini-course, Art of the Month. This semester's course, "Cultural Connections in Three Dimensions from the UI Museum of Art Permanent Collection," highlights selected works from the museum's permanent collection of sculptural objects and will consider their connections to other art forms and ideas from a variety of cultures.

The remaining sessions in the spring series, "Modernist Visions of the 'Primitive' " and "A Consideration of the East/West Cultural Exchange at Mid-Century," will take place at 10 a.m. on Saturdays April 3 and May 1.

Art of the Month sessions are open to the public free of charge, and new participants are welcome at the each session.

In her presentation March 6, Allen will explore the changing nature of modern sculpture in Europe and America through examination of works both inside and outside the museum, including Henry Moore's "Leaf Figure" and Mark di Suvero's untitled outdoor sculpture, among many others.

Allen said, "We will be discussing how changing techniques represent new approaches to sculpture, with lasting consequences for the history of art. Over the course of past century, practices in sculpture have switched from the more traditional techniques of carving and modeling used in early 20th-century Europe, to the more industrial techniques and materials utilized in present-day America."

The March 6 session will require some walking.

The UI Museum of Art, located on North Riverside Drive in Iowa City, is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays. Admission is free. Public metered parking is available in UI parking lots across from the museum on Riverside Drive and just north of the museum.

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COLLEGIUM CANCELLED MARCH 7 -- The March 7 concert by the University of Iowa Collegium Musicum, announced on some arts calendars, has been cancelled.

2/19/99