Please note: Internet access to the full text of articles summarized below may require on-line subscriptions to the publication in some instances.

PALM BEACH (Fla.) POST, Dec. 29 -- The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is mentioned in an article examining the alleged "turf war" among Midwest hospitals over the need for additional liver transplant programs.

NEW YORK TIMES, Dec. 29 -- LAWRENCE G. HUNSICKER, a kidney specialist at the University of Iowa, is quoted in an article examining the alleged "turf war" among Midwest hospitals over the need for additional liver transplant programs. Hunsicker accuses his fellow transplant professionals of "squabbling like spoiled children."
http://www.nytimes.com/library/national/science/122999sci-organ-transplants.html

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, Dec. 29 -- A story about the advent of hybrid gas-and-electric cars says the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is beginning to look at the technology of charging drivers on a use basis, rather than on a consumption basis since hybrid vehicles use little fossil fuel.
http://www.startribune.com/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=BERN29&date=29-Dec-1999&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

MCCALL.COM, Dec. 28 -- The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA turned down a $45,000 Miller Brewing contract to sponsor the football and basketball coaches' post-game shows. Instead, it opened a new alcohol-free tailgate party parking lot this year. It also eliminated a campus pub and turned the space over to students for late night, alcohol-free social programming.
http://www.mcall.com:80/html/news/regional/46556.htm

TIME, Dec. 27 -- Just last month University of Iowa neurobiologist ANTONIO DAMASIO reported findings from a study showing that early brain injuries affect the long-term ability to distinguish between right and wrong. Damasio's findings were included in an article that also quoted University of Iowa psychiatrist DONALD BLACK, whose book "Bad Boys, Bad Men: Confronting Antisocial Personality Disorder" was published early this year. "We blame crime on everything from bad parenting to violent video games," says Black. "But medical journals don't cover ASP, and no one wants to look at it. It's baffling."
http://www.pathfinder.com/time/magazine/articles/0,3266,36272,00.html

AMARILLO (Texas) GLOBE-NEWS, Dec. 27 -- Elaine King Miller, associate dean for student outcomes assessment for Amarillo's Texas Tech School of Pharmacy, has been named a finalist for president of Colby College in Maine. Miller obtained her doctoral and post-doctoral training at the University of Michigan, Harvard University, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the Coverdale Institute.

TIME, Dec. 27 -- Many of the most depraved, coldhearted criminals suffer from a definable but little studied psychiatric disorder known as antisocial personality. "We blame crime on everything from bad parenting to violent video games," says University of Iowa psychiatrist DONALD BLACK, whose book "Bad Boys, Bad Men: Confronting Antisocial Personality Disorder" was published early this year. "But medical journals don't cover ASP, and no one wants to look at it. It's baffling."
http://www.pathfinder.com/time/magazine/articles/0,3266,36272,00.html

LINCOLN (Neb.) JOURNAL STAR, Dec. 27 -- A Lincoln law firm working with a nationally known death penalty expert has been recommended to conduct a study into the fairness of Nebraska's death penalty. The Nebraska Crime Commission will decide at its Jan. 14 meeting whether to accept the recommendation a select committee made Tuesday awarding the bid to the Keating, O'Gara, Davis and Nedved law firm. University of Iowa law professor DAVID BALDUS, who has studied the death penalty in five other states, would analyze the data collected by a team led by Gary Young, a civil attorney with the Lincoln law firm. Baldus said in a telephone interview Tuesday that while he has no position on the death penalty, more than 20 years of research has revealed that it is arbitrarily administered in many jurisdictions and in some places is racially discriminatory. "The death penalty's a very local process," Baldus said. "It's controlled by decisions made at local levels. So it varies from place to place."
http://www.journalstar.com:80/archives/122299/loc/sto6

PROVIDENCE JOURNAL (R.I.), Dec. 26 -- JENNIFER R. NIEBYL, head of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, says, "Pregnant women should be discouraged from using over-the-counter drugs for trivial indications. "Thus, a common cold is best treated with rest, fluids, a humidifier and, if needed, a saltwater (saline) nasal spray like Ocean. Topical medications, like a decongestant nasal spray, are safer than oral ones, and if any cold remedy is used, combination drugs are best avoided. Cough remedies containing iodide should be avoided because they may cause a large goiter in an unborn child. The same article appeared in the COMMERCIAL APPEAL in Memphis, Tenn., and Nov. 18 in the RICHMOND TIMES-DISPATCH in Virginia.

SEATTLE TIMES, Dec. 26 -- A story about embattled Seattle Mayor Paul Schell says he grew up in a small Iowa farming town, the oldest of six children and son of a Lutheran minister. After studying political science at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and earning a law degree at Columbia, Schell arrived in Seattle in 1967, leaving a job at a private law firm in New York to join Perkins Coie.
http://archives.seattletimes.com/cgi-bin/texis.mummy/web/vortex/display?storyID=3865e72f5c&query=%22University+of+Iowa%22

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, Dec. 24 -- BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, an historian and professor at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, specializes in the history of work. He worries that work is fast replacing religion in providing meaning in people's lives. "Work has become how we define ourselves," he said. "It is now answering the traditional religious questions: Who am I? How do I find meaning and purpose? Work is no longer just about economics; it's about identity."
http://www.startribune.com/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=FAST24&date=24-Dec-1999&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, Dec. 23 -- For years, professors at the University of Iowa have provided political junkies with a financial outlet for their wild speculation. The Iowa Electronic Markets is an online system that enables people to bid on the presidential or congressional candidates they think are most likely to win. Anyone could jump in -- as long as he was willing to spend at least $5 and had a Telnet connection to the Internet. When ROBERT FORSYTHE, an economics professor, and several other Iowa professors started the project in 1988, fewer than 200 traders got involved. This year about 3,900 people have signed up.
http://www.startribune.com/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=TECR23&date=23-Dec-1999&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, Dec. 23 -- The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation has asked researchers to suspend recruitment of patients for foundation-funded gene-therapy studies that use a delivery system blamed in the September death of an Arizona teenager. Foundation president Robert T. Beall said that two institutions -- the University of Pennsylvania and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA -- were involved in such studies and that only Penn had begun enrolling patients. "This is a cautionary move," Beall said. "We certainly haven't seen any adverse effects. But with all the controversy . . . we felt we wanted to get the FDA (U.S. Food and Drug Administration) to provide recommendations on the use of adenovirus." The adenovirus, the same virus that causes colds, has served as a delivery vehicle, or vector, for sending therapeutic genes into patients. The virus is modified, however, so it does not cause a cold.
http://www.phillynews.com:80/inquirer/99/Dec/23/international/GENE23.htm

CHICAGO SUN-TIMES, Dec. 23 -- The Heartland Poll, released Monday by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S SOCIAL SCIENCE INSTITUTE, showed that Vice President Al Gore's support among likely Democratic caucus participants dropped from 61 percent to 48 percent in December. Democratic challenger Bill Bradley's support jumped from 19 percent to 27 percent.
http://www.suntimes.com:80/output/news/brad23.html

PITTSBURGH POST-GAZETTE, Dec. 23 -- "A small state like Iowa, where you can make an impression with face-to-face campaigning, is the place where an underdog candidate like (Bill) Bradley has to make a showing," said CARY COVINGTON, a political science professor at the University of Iowa, referring to the Iowa Caucuses. Many political watchers say Bradley's efforts are sparking interest. The Heartland Poll, released Monday by University of Iowa's Social Science Institute, showed that Gore's support among likely Democratic caucus-goers dropped from 61 percent to 48 percent in December, whereas Bradley's support jumped from 19 percent to 27 percent.

KANSAS CITY STAR, Dec. 23 -- A nonpartisan Heartland Poll survey, conducted by the University of Iowa, shows John McCain closing in on Steve Forbes for second place among Republican Presidential contenders. The poll showed Bush with 60 percent support, followed by Forbes with 10 percent and McCain with 7 percent. Poll director ARTHUR MILLER said Forbes' support had fallen by 7 percentage points since late September, while McCain had gained 5 points. The telephone survey of about 330 Iowa Republicans, conducted Nov. 30 to Dec. 16, has a margin of error of plus or minus 4 points. "There is this kind of latent support for McCain," Miller said. "It could become a groundswell. He's looking pretty good."

ROCKFORD (Ill.) REGISTER STAR, Dec. 23 -- Belvidere High School alumni were invited back to the Illinois school to share their post-graduation stories, including Greg Winn, who is now attending the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Winn said the get-together "helps some people see there is life beyond high school and Belvidere."

SAN FRANCISCO DAILY JOURNAL, Dec. 23 -- KENNETH J. KRESS, a professor of law and director of the Civil Commitment Project at the University of Iowa College of Law, is quoted in an article about California's Lanterman-Petris-Short Act, which provides for involuntary treatment of mentally ill people if a person is a danger to himself or others or has become gravely disabled. Responding to a proposed amendment that would improve access to care, Kress said the courts will have to determine whether a person's mental capacity permits autonomous decision-making. "If a person, due to a severe mental illness, isn't able to make rational choices, and isn't able to deliberate over what would be best and then follow through on those choices, I don't think treatment interventions will raise significant civil liberties issues."

OMAHA WORLD-HERALD, Dec. 22 -- A Lincoln law firm working with a nationally known death penalty expert has been recommended to conduct a study into the fairness of Nebraska's death penalty. The Nebraska Crime Commission will decide at its Jan. 14 meeting whether to accept the recommendation a select committee made Tuesday awarding the bid to the Keating, O'Gara, Davis and Nedved law firm. University of Iowa law professor DAVID BALDUS, who has studied the death penalty in five other states, would analyze the data collected by a team led by Gary Young, a civil attorney with the Lincoln law firm. Baldus said in a telephone interview Tuesday that while he has no position on the death penalty, more than 20 years of research has revealed that it is arbitrarily administered in many jurisdictions and in some places is racially discriminatory. "The death penalty's a very local process," Baldus said. "It's controlled by decisions made at local levels. So it varies from place to place."

ARIZONA REPUBLIC, Dec. 22 -- A nonpartisan Heartland Poll survey, conducted by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, shows John McCain closing in on Steve Forbes for second place among Republican Presidential contenders.

PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, Dec. 22 -- A nonpartisan Heartland Poll survey, conducted by the University of Iowa, showed Republican presidential candidate John McCain closing in on Steve Forbes for second place among Republican presidential contenders. The poll showed George W. Bush with 60 percent support, followed by Forbes with 10 percent and McCain with 7 percent. Poll director ARTHUR MILLER said Forbes' support had fallen by 7 percentage points since late September, while McCain had gained 5 points.

INVESTORS BUSINESS DAILY, Dec. 22 -- A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA poll shows Vice President Al Gore's lead over Sen. Bill Bradley in the state slipped 13 percent since October. Gore still leads Bradley, 48 percent to 27 percent, with 24 percent undecided.

DETROIT NEWS, Dec. 22 -- As Detroit Lions defensive lineman James Jones prepares for his most important game of the season on Christmas Day against Denver, his mind is on wife Son-Ja who is home in Bettendorf, Iowa, undergoing dialysis three days a week. Her kidneys deteriorated suddenly, and she is awaiting a kidney for transplant. Son-Ja is No. 1 on the donor list at the University of Wisconsin and No. 2 at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://detnews.com:80/1999/sports/9912/22/12220212.htm

PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, Dec 22 -- A nonpartisan Heartland Poll survey, conducted by the University of Iowa, shows John McCain closing in on Steve Forbes for second place among Republican Presidential contenders. The poll showed Bush with 60 percent support, followed by Forbes with 10 percent and McCain with 7 percent. Poll director ARTHUR MILLER said Forbes' support had fallen by 7 percentage points since late September, while McCain had gained 5 points. The telephone survey of about 330 Iowa Republicans, conducted Nov. 30 to Dec. 16, has a margin of error of plus or minus 4 points. "There is this kind of latent support for McCain," Miller said. "It could become a groundswell. He's looking pretty good."
http://www.phillynews.com/inquirer/99/Dec/22/national/MCCAIN22.htm

CNN ALL POLITICS, Dec. 21 -- GOP presidential hopeful Steve Forbes has spent a considerable amount of time and money campaigning in Iowa, while Arizona Sen. John McCain has largely avoided the state. Yet, a recent Heartland Poll from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA indicates that McCain is nipping at Forbes' heels, while he trails front-running Texas Gov. George W. Bush by 50 percentage points. In an interview with CNN's Judy Woodruff on CNN's "Inside Politics" Thursday, Forbes rejected the poll's findings and instead asserted that his Iowa campaign is going strong.
http://www.cnn.com/1999/ALLPOLITICS/stories/12/21/forbes.video/index.html

USA TODAY, Dec. 21 -- In a 1994 case, McCleskey vs. Kemp, the Supreme Court discounted a study that contended that the death penalty is used disproportionately against blacks. The court said that, even if the statistics were true, the imbalance in the death penalty did not amount to a violation of the 8th Amendment's ban on ''cruel and unusual punishment.'' That decision has made it difficult to argue that geographic disparities are unconstitutional. But DAVID BALDUS, author of the study used in the 1994 case, says the Santiago case could affect the ''whole system'' of capital punishment. ''It would open the system to tremendous vulnerability,'' says Baldus, a law professor at the University of Iowa. Just debating the question, Baldus continues, would have value for death penalty opponents. ''It would show that there's not a true consensus of support for the death penalty (in the states),'' he says. ''Even in the South, it's just place to place.'' The article appeared on the front page of the paper version of USA Today, as well as on its Web site.

LOS ANGELES TIMES, Dec. 21 -- "A small state like Iowa, where you can make an impression with face-to-face campaigning, is the place where an underdog candidate like (Bill) Bradley has to make a showing," said CARY COVINGTON, a political science professor at the University of Iowa, referring to the upcoming Iowa Caucuses. Many political watchers say Bradley's efforts are sparking interest. The Heartland Poll, released Monday by University of Iowa's Social Science Institute, showed that Gore's support among likely Democratic caucus-goers dropped from 61 percent to 48 percent in December, whereas Bradley's support jumped from 19 percent to 27 percent.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Dec. 21 -- In a section of the paper's Web site devoted to kids, a young reporter learns in an interview with actor Ashton Kutcher of Fox's "That '70s Show" that he got his start while attending the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1997. "A woman told me to enter a modeling contest. At first, I was like, 'What, is that like even a job for guys to do? Well, I won the contest and got a trip to New York. After that, I was traveling around the world modeling."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/leisure/kidnews/article/0,2669,SAV-9912210045,FF.html

BOSTON GLOBE, Dec. 21 -- Vice President Al Gore leads former senator Bill Bradley among Democrats in Iowa but the former basketball star has cut the gap in half in the past two months, according to a poll released yesterday. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA poll of 330 Democrats and 330 Republicans likely to vote in next month's Iowa caucuses also found Texas Governor George W. Bush dominating the Republican race. The polls each had a sampling error of plus or minus 4 percentage points. Among Democrats, Gore led Bradley 48-27 percent with 24 percent undecided. In October, Gore had led 61-19 with only 18 percent undecided.

WICHITA (Kan.) EAGLE, Dec. 21 -- Researchers at the University of Iowa report that most soda pop contains enough fluoride to be considered a significant source of the cavity-fighting substance for pop guzzlers. For the November issue of the Journal of the American Dental Association, the researchers analyzed 332 carbonated soft drinks purchased in Iowa and found, on average, they contained a significant amount of fluoride. "Approximately 12 percent of children ages 2 to 5 years consume 9 or more ounces of carbonated beverages daily," says JUDY HEILMAN, lead author of the study. If children continue to drink more pop, it "would become an increasingly important factor in total fluoride exposure."
http://www.wichitaeagle.com/news/health/docs/hbriefs1221_txt.htm
The same article appeared Dec. 21 on the DETROIT FREE PRESS Web site at:
http://www.freep.com/news/health/heal21_19991221.htm

CLEVELAND PLAIN DEALER, Dec. 20 -- For years, professors at the University of Iowa have provided political junkies a financial outlet for their wild speculation. The Iowa Electronic Markets is an online system that enables people to bid on the presidential or congressional candidates they think are most likely to win. When ROBERT FORSYTHE, an economics professor, and several other Iowa professors started the project in 1988, fewer than 200 traders got involved. This year about 3,900 people have signed up. Anyone online can place bids, worth up to $500, on the outcomes of several races.
http://www.cleveland.com:80/business/news/fm20bri.ssf

CNN ALL POLITICS, Dec. 20 -- Vice President Al Gore leads former Sen. Bill Bradley among Democrats in Iowa but the former basketball star has cut the gap in half in the past two months, according to a new poll released Monday. The University of Iowa poll of 330 Democrats and 330 Republicans likely to vote in next month's Iowa caucuses also found Texas Gov. George W. Bush dominating the Republican race. The polls each had a sampling error of plus or minus four percentage points. "The increase in 'undecided' indicates that Democrats are rethinking their earlier commitments,'' said pollster ARTHUR MILLER. "With the caucuses only one month off, Bradley appears to be surging at the right time.''
http://cnn.com/1999/ALLPOLITICS/stories/12/20/bradley.reut/index.html

YAHOO!NEWS, Dec. 20 -- Vice President Al Gore leads former Sen. Bill Bradley among Democrats in Iowa but the former basketball star has cut the gap in half in the past two months, according to a new poll released Monday. The University of Iowa poll of 330 Democrats and 330 Republicans likely to vote in next month's Iowa caucuses also found Texas Gov. George W. Bush dominating the Republican race. The polls each had a sampling error of plus or minus four percentage points. "The increase in 'undecided' indicates that Democrats are rethinking their earlier commitments,'' said pollster ARTHUR MILLER. "With the caucuses only one month off, Bradley appears to be surging at the right time.''
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/19991220/pl/politics_iowa_1.html
The same REUTERS article appeared Dec. 21 on the EXCITE NEWS Web site and on InfoSeek's GO NETWORK Web site at:
http://infoseek.go.com/Content?arn=a3407roptz-19991220&qt=%2BReuters+%2B%22University+of+Iowa%22&sv=IS&lk=noframes&col=NX&kt=A&ak=news1486

THE COMMERCIAL APPEAL, Memphis, Tenn., Dec. 20 -- University of Iowa professor BRUCE GRONBECK says Democratic presidential candidate Al Gore's I-feel-your-pain, down-home tack is a good one. "The humanization of Al Gore is terribly important here," says Gronbeck, author of "Presidential Campaigns and American Self Images." "The whole notion of demonstrating that he knows the country and he knows the country's problems is something I suspect is much easier for him to do as a Tennessean than as a Washingtonian."

THE RECORD, Hackensack, N.J. Dec. 20 -- Researchers at the University of Iowa, writing in the November issue of the Journal of the American Dental Association, report that most soda pop contains enough fluoride to be considered a significant source of the cavity-fighting substance. "Surveys indicate that children have increased their intake of carbonated beverages," said JUDY HEILMAN, lead author of the study. "Approximately 12 percent of children ages 2 to 5 years consume 9 or more ounces of carbonated beverages daily. If this trend continues, it could be that fluoride concentrations in soft drinks would become an increasingly important factor in total fluoride exposure.

RICHMOND (Va.) TIMES-DISPATCH, Dec. 20 -- The writer of a letter to the editor says that data supplied to him by the IOWA TESTING PROGRAMS at the University of Iowa show that students in Fairfax, Va., score much higher on tests than do students in Iowa. Despite this, the writer says, 93 percent of Fairfax schools flunked the Standards of Learning test, a test whose validity the writer was questioning.

THE JOURNAL RECORD, Oklahoma City, Okla., Dec. 20 -- For years, professors at the University of Iowa have provided political junkies a financial outlet for their wild speculation. The IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS (IEM) is an online system that enables people to bid on the presidential or congressional candidates they think are most likely to win. When ROBERT FORSYTHE, an economics professor, and several other Iowa professors started the project in 1988, fewer than 200 traders got involved. This year about 3,900 people have signed up.

THE JOURNAL RECORD (Oklahoma City, Ok.), Dec. 20 -- For years, professors at the University of Iowa have provided political junkies a financial outlet for their wild speculation. The Iowa Electronic Markets (IEM) is an online system that enables people to bid on the presidential or congressional candidates they think are most likely to win. When ROBERT FORSYTHE, an economics professor, and several other Iowa professors started the project in 1988, fewer than 200 traders got involved. This year about 3,900 people have signed up.

THE OREGONIAN, Dec. 19 -- Reports of cheating by students and even teachers and administrators are increasing. THOMAS ROCKLIN, director of the UI Center for Teaching, says this reflects a wider trend in society. The percentage of high schoolers who say they cheat is comparable to the percentage of adults who admit to lying or violating traffic laws. "I don't want to say cheating isn't bad," Rocklin says. "But it's not just a student problem and it's not just a school problem. The simple fix is not to throw away the standardized test. Schools function because of the faith society places in them, and that faith has to be grounded in things that are credible."

GRAND RAPIDS (Mich.) PRESS, Dec. 19 -- MARK A. ARNOLD, a professor of chemistry at the University of Iowa who is developing a noninvasive blood glucose detector, is quoted in a story about kinder, gentler treatments for diabetics. "What we are seeing this year is more information to the diabetic patient delivered in a less painful manner," said Arnold. "We haven't closed the loop yet -- we don't have an automatic system that both detects blood sugar levels and signals a pump to add the right amount of insulin -- but we are getting there." The same New York Times News Service article ran Dec. 14 in the GLOBE & MAIL of Toronto, Ontario; Dec. 9 in the NEWS & OBSERVER of Raleigh, N.C., and the ST. PETERSBURG TIMES in Florida; and Dec. 7 in the CINCINNATI ENQUIRER and the TELEGRAM & GAZETTE of Worcester, Mass.

KANSAS CITY STAR, Dec. 19 -- An article about Cinnamon Schultz, who appears in "Prelude to a Kiss" at the Unicorn Theatre in Kansas City, says that for her graduate thesis at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA she performed a 10-character, one-woman play; about half the characters were men, ranging from a Comanche chief to a Southern Baptist preacher.
http://www.kcstar.com:80/item/pages/fyi.pat?file=fyi/3774158b.c16

DESERET NEWS (Salt Lake City), Dec. 19 -- A writer's feature on her visit to Iowa says her son and daughter-in-law had been describing the "incredible friendliness of the Iowans they've met since they arrived in Iowa City in July to attend the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. But you have to encounter it to believe it."
http://deseretnews.com:80/dn/view/0,1249,145011290,00.html?

WASHINGTON POST, Dec. 19 -- Around the holidays, people feel this time crunch most acutely, observed BENJAMIN K. HUNNICUTT, professor of leisure studies at the University of Iowa. Like the concept of "the weekend" or "summer vacation," Christmas presents the members of a work-worshipping society with a small circumscribed time in which to, essentially, define their values. "Christmas raises the question, what is worth doing in and of itself?" Hunnicutt said in a telephone interview last week. And with work claiming more and more of people's time, they have less left over in which to answer that heavily weighted question.

SAN JOSE (Calif.) MERCURY NEWS, Dec. 18 -- FRANCES FLANNERY-DAILEY, a UI graduate student in religion, presented a paper on "Film and the Apocalypse'' at the American Academy of Religion's annual meeting. Drawing from a spate of recent movies with apocalyptic themes, she was among five scholars analyzing the ways in which films reflect society's expectation for the upcoming millennium and any apocalyptic events that may accompany it. Flannery-Dailey examined draining the religious meaning from the event in favor of a more human-centered interpretation. "The divine is nowhere in view,'' said Frances Flannery-Dailey in her lecture on "Bruce Willis as the Messiah.'' Flannery-Dailey argues that Willis' films, such as "Armageddon'' and "Twelve Monkeys,'' in both of which Willis' character sacrifices his life to save the world, present human effort as the only way to do so.

NEW YORK TIMES, Dec. 17 -- CHRISTOPHER D. ROY of the University of Iowa is curator of "Kilengi: African Art From the Bareiss Family Collection," a traveling exhibition of sub-Saharan sculpture making its final stop at the Neuberger Museum of Art at Purchases College of the State University of New York. Roy says in the exhibition catalogue that the Bareiss examples were big news to him when he first saw them, and a visitor coming on them cold at the Neuberger might not take them for African at all.

PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, Dec. 17 -- "Political cartooning is on the endangered species list,'' said JOHN SOLOSKI, director of the University of Iowa's journalism school. "(Even though) there's probably no section of a daily newspaper that draws as much reaction day in and day out.'' Concerned by the state of their art, top cartoonists from around the nation gathered in Iowa City recently at a public symposium that drew several hundred listeners. The conference honored Los Angeles Times cartoonist Paul Conrad, a three-time Pulitzer Prize winner who began his career at the university paper in Iowa City. The article appears on the Inquirer's Web site.

USA TODAY, Dec. 17 -- A story about public colleges that hire Washington lobbyists says some universities place a low priority on lobbying yet still manage to effectively attract federal money -- including the University of Iowa. In fiscal 1999, the university received $140 million in federal research funds, or about 10 percent of its $1.5 billion budget, said DEREK WILLARD, who handles the school's governmental affairs. But the university hired no professional lobbyist and spent only $20,000 on in-house lobbying expenses, in addition to salaries for Willard and an administrative assistant. ''We've always been very conservative about spending money,'' University of Iowa spokeswoman ANN RHODES said. ''We think it works pretty well like it is. We have people who are internally accountable.''
http://www.usatoday.com/news/washdc/ncsfri04.htm

WASHINGTON POST, Dec. 17 -- A story about "American Movie" says its director, Chris Smith, met fellow filmmaker Mark Borchardt in Milwaukee in 1995. Fresh out of film school at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Smith was teaching an independent-study class at the University of Wisconsin while putting the finishing touches on "American Job," a shoestring black comedy about working that would eventually take the first-time director to Sundance. Smith was so taken by Borchardt -- and his thwarted, tortured efforts to complete his own first feature -- that he decided to make a movie about him. That film, made with Smith's old Iowa classmate Sarah Price, became "American Movie," a wry documentary about pursuing cinematic dreams while living a low-rent nightmare.

NEW YORK TIMES, Dec. 16 -- For years, professors at the University of Iowa have provided political junkies a financial outlet for their wild speculation. The Iowa Electronic Markets (IEM) is an online system that enables people to bid on the presidential or congressional candidates they think are most likely to win. When ROBERT FORSYTHE, an economics professor, and several other Iowa professors started the project in 1988, fewer than 200 traders got involved. This year about 3,900 people have signed up.
http://www10.nytimes.com/library/tech/99/12/circuits/articles/16geek.html

THE HINDU, Dec. 16 -- The human brain can't compensate for damage to the frontal lobe during childhood. Because such damage can stop children from learning moral rules, the finding may shed light on why people become psychopathic. Researchers from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA studied a 20-year-old woman and a 23-year-old man whose frontal lobes were damaged when they were infants. Like many patients who suffer the same damage in adulthood, they scored normally on intelligence tests, but showed impaired social behavior. The finding suggests the damage prevented the patients from learning moral reasoning as children. THE HINDU is the Web site of India's national newspaper.
http://www.indiaserver.com:80/thehindu/1999/12/16/stories/08160006.htm

NEWS & OBSERVER, Raleigh, N.C., Dec. 15 -- During a 24-hour period around May 11, the solar wind suddenly and unexpectedly died away almost completely, giving scientists a rare window to see the sun's corona directly. "Normally, our view of the corona from Earth is like seeing the sun on an overcast, cloudy day," said JACK D. SCUDDER, a UI professor of physics and astronomy, speaking at the American Geophysical Union meeting. "But on May 11, the clouds broke and we could see it clearly. It was a very unusual opportunity, and it was very exciting."

QUEST, Tucson, Ariz., Dec. 15 -- KEVIN P. CAMPBELL at the University of Iowa is among the 55 newly elected members to the prestigious Institute of Medicine, part of the National Academy of Sciences. The institute identifies issues of major concern to public health and reports on these to the government.

PRESERVATION, Dec. 15 -- TOM LUTZ, a professor of English at the University of Iowa who lectures on the culture of Hollywood, is quoted in an article about the clash between sightseers and homeowners downhill from Hollywood's signature landmark. "The power of the Hollywood myth is so great that when people arrive, they want to be swept up in it," said Lutz.

MODBEE.COM, Dec. 15 -- Dentists have traditionally looked with disfavor upon soda pop because the sweetened water could contribute to tooth decay, but now a study suggests there may be an upside to the increasingly popular beverages. Researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA say most soda pop contains enough fluoride to be considered a significant source of the cavity-fighting substance. In the Journal of the American Dental Association, researchers checked 332 soft drinks. MODBEE.COM is the Web site for the MODESTO (Calif.) BEE.
http://www.modbee.com/living/story/0,1155,121615,00.html

SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, Dec. 14 - During a 24-hour period around May 11, the solar wind suddenly and unexpectedly died away almost completely, giving scientists a rare window to see the sun's corona directly. "Normally, our view of the corona from Earth is like seeing the sun on an overcast, cloudy day," said JACK D. SCUDDER, a UI professor of physics and astronomy, speaking at the American Geophysical Union meeting. "But on May 11, the clouds broke and we could see it clearly. It was a very unusual opportunity, and it was very exciting."
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/1999/12/14/MN21681.DTL
This article also appeared on the (Salt Lake City) DESERET NEWS Web site: http://deseretnews.com/dn/view/0,1249,145011120,00.html
Articles on this topic were also posted to the following Web sites: SAN JOSE (Calif.) MERCURY NEWS, the AKRON (Ohio) BEACON-JOURNAL and the PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER:
http://www.phillynews.com/inquirer/99/Dec/14/national/SUN14.htm
SPACE.COM: http://www.space.com/space/solar_winds_991214.html

OMAHA WORLD-HERALD, Dec. 14 - The University of Iowa is among the institutions that are carrying out research that uses tissue from elective and spontaneous abortions. "We are very open about our research," said DAVID SKORTON, vice president for research. "There is no attempt to put anything over on anybody." The research seeks to better understand the development of either the structure or function of different parts of the body, he said. It has significance for everyone from premature infants to children and adults affected by birth defects, and researchers are required to obtain approval through federal and local review procedures, he said.
http://www.omaha.com/Omaha/OWH/StoryViewer/1,3153,265227,00.html

NEW YORK TIMES, Dec. 14 - On May 11, the solar wind dropped to a few percent of its normal density and its speed was cut in half. No one is quite sure why. But instruments aboard nearly a dozen spacecraft have revealed that the relative calm set in motion a series of events that could help scientists unravel the mysteries of how the solar wind influences "space weather" near Earth. JACK D. SCUDDER, a UI professor of physics and astronomy, said that in some respects the episode was the "all-time barn burner" in terms of the events it sparked in Earth's corner of space. When the wind is blowing at full force, it can shake loose particles from the radiation belts, which were discovered by the UI's JAMES VAN ALLEN in the 1950's.
http://www.nytimes.com/library/national/science/121499sci-solar-wind.html

BERGEN (N.J.) RECORD, Dec. 14 - Scientists gathering at the American Geophysical Union conference in San Francisco are discussing what might have caused the solar wind to die down for about a day earlier this year. This inexplicable solar phenomenon could turn out to be a scientific bonanza, said JACK D. SCUDDER, a UI professor of physics and astronomy. Instead of the normal gigantic solar upheaval that makes the sun hard to study, he said, "you get kind of a whimper of an explosion. That's something that's priceless."
http://www.bergen.com/morenews/solar199912149.htm

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR, Dec. 14 - Reports of cheating by students and even teachers and administrators are increasing. THOMAS ROCKLIN, director of the UI Center for Teaching, says this reflects a wider trend in society. The percentage of high schoolers who say they cheat is comparable to the percentage of adults who admit to lying or violating traffic laws. "I don't want to say cheating isn't bad," Rocklin says. "But it's not just a student problem and it's not just a school problem. The simple fix is not to throw away the standardized test. Schools function because of the faith society places in them, and that faith has to be grounded in things that are credible."
http://www.csmonitor.com/durable/1999/12/14/fp1s1-csm.shtml

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, Dec. 13 -- MARK A. ARNOLD, a professor of chemistry at the University of Iowa who is developing a noninvasive blood glucose detector, is quoted in a story about kinder, gentler treatments for diabetics. "What we are seeing this year is more information to the diabetic patient delivered in a less painful manner," said Arnold. "We haven't closed the loop yet -- we don't have an automatic system that both detects blood sugar levels and signals a pump to add the right amount of insulin -- but we are getting there." The same New York Times article also appeared Dec. 7 in the HOUSTON CHRONICLE.

CHICAGO SUN-TIMES, Dec. 13 - A column full of quirky news tidbits mentions that members of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA STUDENTS AGAINST SWEATSHOPS are singing carols in which "Silent Night" is "Human Rights," "Jingle Bells" is "Sweatshop Hells" and "The Twelve Days of Christmas" is "The Twelve Days of Sweatshopping."

ABC--GOOD MORNING AMERICA, Dec. 13 -- ABC News' George Stephanopoulos reported on the Iowa Electronic Markets, which are futures markets for political candidates. JOYCE BERG, IEM co-director and associate professor of accounting, said the IEM can be more accurate than pundits and polls because traders have a financial incentive behind their decisions. TOM RIETZ, IEM co-director and associate professor of finance, was shown using the IEM as part of his class.

PENSIONS & INVESTMENTS, Dec. 13 -- TIFFANI SHAW has been promoted to CFO and treasurer of the $581 million University of Iowa Foundation. Previously, she was controller and assistant treasurer. She replaces Larry Bruse, who retired.

DENVER ROCKY MOUNTAIN NEWS, Dec. 12 -- HAROLD L. SCHOEN, a math professor at the University of Iowa, co-authored an editorial commenting on a column that focused on a politicized letter that objects to the U.S. Department of Education's expert panel ratings of mathematics curricula. "This letter, which is highly controversial within the mathematics community, reflects a minority opinion that contrasts sharply with the evidence," Schoen writes.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Dec. 12 -- Researchers at the University of Iowa, writing in the November issue of the Journal of the American Dental Association, report that most soda pop contains enough fluoride to be considered a significant source of the cavity-fighting substance. "Surveys indicate that children have increased their intake of carbonated beverages," said JUDY HEILMAN, lead author of the study. "Approximately 12 percent of children ages 2 to 5 years consume 9 or more ounces of carbonated beverages daily. If this trend continues, it could be that fluoride concentrations in soft drinks would become an increasingly important factor in total fluoride exposure."
http://chicagotribune.com/article/0,1051,SAV-9912120051,00.html
A report on this research also appeared in the Dec. 13 MILWAUKEE JOURNAL SENTINEL:
http://www.jsonline.com/alive/news/dec99/medbrfs13121299.asp

NEW YORK TIMES, Dec. 12 -- A writer describes her experience as a dancer in "The Descent Beckons," a new piece by Susan Marshall and Company, commissioned as part of the millennium festival for HANCHER AUDITORIUM at the UI.
http://www.nytimes.com/99/12/13/artleisure/marshall-dance.html

LOS ANGELES TIMES, Dec. 12 -- An article about career counseling includes the example of Frances Thronson, a California office worker who finds her job stifling because it doesn't allow her to use her creative skills. Thronson is a graduate of the UI WRITERS' WORKSHOP.
http://www.latimes.com/class/employ/clcareer/19991212/t000113205.html

BOSTON GLOBE, Dec. 12 -- Chris Smith and Sarah Price, director and producer of the new independent film "An American Movie," met while studying film at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.boston.com/dailyglobe2/346/living/A_Midwesterner_s_saga+.shtml

OMAHA WORLD-HERALD, Dec. 10 -- A story about West Des Moines resident Steve McCullough's first novel, "Returning to the Garden," a novel about an unusual discovery on Mars, says he is a business school graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.omaha.com/Omaha/OWH/StoryViewer/1,,263310,00.html

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Dec. 10 - An opinion piece about the play "Spinning into Butter" notes that the author, Rebecca Gilman, holds an M.F.A. in playwriting from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v46/i16/16b00901.htm

CHICAGO SUN-TIMES, Dec. 10 -- Recent studies at Vanderbilt University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA SCHOOL OF MEDICINE found no evidence that chocolate causes hyperactivity in kids.

SAN ANTONIO (Texas) EXPRESS-NEWS, Dec. 10 -- CULVER BOLDT of the University of Iowa's University Hospitals comments on the removal of a child's eyes, which were riddled with cancerous tumors. "It' s the most severe case we've seen in decades here at the university," said Boldt. "These are very aggressive tumors. It can be an extremely lethal condition." The ASSOCIATED PRESS article also ran Dec. 8 in the following papers: THE TAMPA TRIBUNE, THE KNOXVILLE NEWS-SENTINEL, THE ARKANSAS DEMOCRAT-GAZETTE and the DAILY NEWS of Woodland Hills, Calif.

MIDLANDS BUSINESS JOURNAL, Omaha, Neb. Dec. 9 -- The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is offering a master's degree program in science education in Council Bluffs beginning in the spring 2000 semester. The program is open to practicing teachers at the elementary or secondary school level and to science educators in other institutions.

OMAHA WORLD-HERALD, Dec. 9 -- JOHN REINHARDT, a longtime faculty member and department chairman at the University of Iowa, has been named dean of the University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Dentistry. The appointment, which is subject to approval by the University of Nebraska Board of Regents, was made Wednesday by Dr. Harold Maurer, chancellor of the NU Medical Center. Reinhardt, 50, has served on the University of Iowa dental faculty for 22 years.
http://www.omaha.com/Omaha/OWH/StoryViewer/1,,263156,00.html

PLAIN DEALER, Dec. 9 -- Democratic presidential candidate Bill Bradley brings up racial issues before almost every audience. At the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Bradley was asked why he was talking about race to a roomful of white Iowans. "Why not to you?" he answered. "I talk about it everywhere I go?" The same article appeared Dec. 7 in the FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM.

ROCHESTER (N.Y.) DEMOCRAT AND CHRONICLE, Dec. 9 -- Researchers from the National Cancer Institute are spending a week in New York to interview residents to try to find out why so many women on Long Island are getting breast cancer. The NCI researchers will attempt to produce a visual image that may link breast cancer incidence with pollution sites on Long Island using Geographic Information Systems, a technology that has been around for decades and is used extensively in community and economic development, emergency management and land and natural resource use. GERARD, a professor of geography and adjunct professor of public health at the University of Iowa, who is a consultant on the nearly $5-million project, said modern mapping techniques can sidestep issues of confidentiality. Sensitive information, he said, can be blurred by using a computerized "geographic mask" and other techniques to hide exact locations of the people studied.

BIRMINGHAM NEWS, Dec. 8 -- CULVER BOLDT of the University of Iowa's University Hospitals comments on the removal of a child's eyes, which were riddled with cancerous tumors. "It' s the most severe case we've seen in decades here at the university," said Boldt. "These are very aggressive tumors. It can be an extremely lethal condition." The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran Dec. 8 in the OMAHA WORLD-HERALD.

OMAHA WORLD-HERALD, Dec. 8 -- A growing number of University of Iowa students are studying abroad, most of them in Western Europe, and more international students have come to Iowa City this year than in the past, according to JANIS PERKINS, director of the university's Office of Study Abroad.

SALT LAKE TRIBUNE, Dec. 8 -- CULVER BOLDT of the University of Iowa's University Hospitals comments on the removal of a child's eyes, which were riddled with cancerous tumors. "It' s the most severe case we've seen in decades here at the university," said Boldt. "These are very aggressive tumors. It can be an extremely lethal condition." The story can be found on the paper's Web site at:
http://www.sltrib.com:80/1999/dec/12081999/nation_w/4234.htm
The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran Dec. 8 on the SPOKANE (Wash.) SPOKESMAN-REVIEW Web site at:
http://www.spokane.net:80/news-story-body.asp?Date=120899&ID=s716832&cat=
The same Associated Press article ran Dec. 7 on the WASHINGTON POST Web site and on the LOS ANGELES TIMES Web site.

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR, Dec. 8 -- The results of the Iowa caucus, where George W. Bush is expected to come in first and Steve Forbes is expected to come in second, may "have no impact on New Hampshire," says ARTHUR MILLER, a political analyst at the University of Iowa. "I think a number of people are thinking along those lines on the Republican side, and so already in a sense writing off Iowa."
http://www.csmonitor.com/durable/1999/12/07/fp3s1-csm.shtml

SEATTLE POST INTELLIGENCER, Dec. 8 -- CULVER BOLDT of the University of Iowa's University Hospitals comments on the removal of a child's eyes, which were riddled with cancerous tumors. "It' s the most severe case we've seen in decades here at the university," said Boldt. "These are very aggressive tumors. It can be an extremely lethal condition." The story can be found on the paper's Web site at:
http://www.seattlep-i.com:80/national/eyes08.shtml
The same ASSOCIATED PRESS story ran Dec. 7 on the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE Web site, the NEW YORK TIMES Web site, the NANDO TIMES Web site (Nando Times is based in North Carolina, possibly a Web site for the Raleigh News & Observer) and on the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE Web site at:
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/1999/12/07/national1432EST0650.DTL

OTTAWA (Canada) CITIZEN, Dec. 8 -- BARRY MARKOVSKY, a social psychologist and director of the Center for the Study of Group Processes at the University of Iowa, is quoted in a story about the possibility people will panic about Y2K. "We want to do whatever we judge is necessary to be prepared and we are, at the same time, making those judgments based on what we see other people doing," he said. "So if other people appear to be reacting in a panicked way, then we start to wonder whether we should be doing the same thing and it can suddenly spread like wildfire. We've been lied to before, that's the attitude."
http://www.ottawacitizen.com:80/city/991207/3256801.html

USA TODAY, Dec. 7 -- A story about author Sena Jeter Naslund's novel "Ahab' s Wife or, The Star Gazer," which aspires to be a literary companion to Herman Melville' s literary classic, first read Moby Dick as a teenager growing up in Birmingham, Ala. As a graduate student of creative writing at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA she drew her formative literary influences from Melville, as well as from novels like Charlotte Bronte' s Jane Eyre and Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights.
http://www.usatoday.com/life/enter/books/book439.htm

NANDO (N.C.) TIMES, Dec. 7 -- The results of the Iowa caucus, where George W. Bush is expected to come in first and Steve Forbes is expected to come in second, may "have no impact on New Hampshire," says ARTHUR MILLER, a political analyst at the University of Iowa. "I think a number of people are thinking along those lines on the Republican side, and so already in a sense writing off Iowa." Nando Times is based in North Carolina, possibly a Web site for the Raleigh News & Observer.

NEW YORK TIMES, Dec. 7 -- MARK A. ARNOLD, a professor of chemistry at the University of Iowa who is developing a noninvasive blood glucose detector, is quoted in a story about kinder, gentler treatments for diabetics. "What we are seeing this year is more information to the diabetic patient delivered in a less painful manner," said Arnold. "We haven't closed the loop yet -- we don't have an automatic system that both detects blood sugar levels and signals a pump to add the right amount of insulin -- but we are getting there."

LOS ANGELES TIMES, Dec. 7 -- In a story about Iowa's efforts to lure native Iowans back to the state, Ted Habte-Gabr, president of the Iowa Club of Los Angeles, an alumni chapter of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, says he has received one letter after another in the last year from Iowa officials urging him to come back. The 31-year-old marketing consultant hasn't been swayed, but he says that's more a reflection of the stage in his life than anything else. "I tell you, if I had kids and was looking for good schools and values, nothing beats the Midwest," said Habte-Gabr, who still visits Iowa a couple of times a year. Then again, he visits only in the spring and fall. "They can have their summers and winters," he said with a hearty laugh.

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR, Dec. 7 -- The results of the Iowa caucus, where George W. Bush is expected to come in first and Steve Forbes is expected to come in second, may "have no impact on New Hampshire," says ARTHUR MILLER, a political analyst at the University of Iowa. "I think a number of people are thinking along those lines on the Republican side, and so already in a sense writing off Iowa."
http://www.csmonitor.com/durable/1999/12/07/text/p3s1.html

WASHINGTON POST, Dec. 7 -- Ann Halverson and her roommate, Keltie Hawkins -- a 24-year-old UNIVERSITY OF IOWA graduate who works in the marketing department of the Brookings Institution -- are among the thousands of hopeful tenants who found out the hard way that going house-to-house in the ultra-hip sections of Northwest Washington D.C. was no picnic. "It's snobbery on our part that we won't look elsewhere in the District," said Hawkins, who adds that urban living "rocks."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/WPlate/1999-12/07/160l-120799-idx.html

THE DELMARVA FARMER, Easton, Md., Dec. 7 -- A team of scientists from Iowa State University, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the USDA have investigated a problem plaguing cattle ranchers in Western states. Pregnant beef cows foraging for food in winter will eat needles from Ponderosa pine trees. Soon after, they give birth prematurely and often the calves don't survive.

PITTSBURGH POST-GAZETTE, Dec. 6 -- Researchers at the University of Iowa, writing in the November issue of the Journal of the American Dental Association, report that most soda pop contains enough fluoride to be considered a significant source of the cavity-fighting substance. JUDY HEILMAN, a scientist at the Dows Institute for Dental Research at the University of Iowa, said: "We're not encouraging anyone to have their kids drink less milk or water and more soft drinks on the basis of this study. But they need to be aware of these kinds of concentrations when considering the total fluoride dose their children might be getting."

ALBUQUERQUE (N.M.) JOURNAL, Dec. 6 -- University of Iowa researchers KEN CULP and JANET MENTES are conducting a study of elderly patients in long-term care. They are making fluids more available to an experimental group of patients by encouraging them to drink water, juices and other non-caffeinated beverages during social activities. What they plan to measure is whether increased fluid intake of water-based drinks improves mental capacity.

CHARLOTTE (N.C.) OBSERVER, Dec. 6 -- A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study found that babies who were provided a more nutritionally dense formula drank less than babies who were given watered-down versions of the same formula. The human body, particularly one less than a year old, knows when enough is enough.

WALL STREET JOURNAL, Dec. 6 -- Among on-line courses recommended by the paper is "Organizational Leadership," offered by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve.cgi?id=SB943299653552799003.djm

SEATTLE TIMES, Dec. 6 -- "Just as the infant's first tears signal a desire for nourishment or comfort, tears usually signal a desire, a wish or a plea," says TOM LUTZ, author of the new book "Crying: The Natural & Cultural History of Tears" (W.W. Norton; $25.95). Until the 19th century, public displays of tears were acceptable and expected, says Lutz. "If the audience wasn't weeping, it wasn't a good play," he says. "This kind of mass public weeping has had a long run in the culture." Through research at the University of Iowa, Lutz, an English professor, discovered a cultural truism that tracks from ancient times through the 18th century: Real men do cry. "The warrior Odysseus is a big weeper, he cries in every book of the Odyssey," Lutz says.

NEW YORK TIMES, Dec. 6 - A review of Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater's latest premiere, "C-sharp Street-B flat Avenue," notes that "HANCHER AUDITORIUM, a forward-looking arts sponsor at the University of Iowa, commissioned the work."
http://www.nytimes.com/99/12/06/news/arts/ailey-dance-review.html

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION Dec. 6 - The National Endowment for the Humanities awarded $9.7-million in grants and fellowships to 172 scholars and 14 colleges and universities. UI recipients include, PAULA MICHAELS, assistant professor of history, and JANET ALTMAN, professor of French and Italian. Both were awarded $30,000 research fellowships.
http://chronicle.com/daily/99/12/99120606n.htm

BOSTON GLOBE, Dec. 6 - A column about Democratic Presidential candidate Bill Bradley says that he is so focused on race as a national issue in his campaign that he discusses it with every crowd he speaks to, even a room full of white people at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.boston.com/dailyglobe2/340/oped/Bradley_s_homage_to_a_race_baiter+.shtml

BOSTON GLOBE, Dec. 6 - A series of science and health news items includes the news that University of Iowa researchers discovered that worms can be used to treat inflammatory bowel disease. JOEL WEINSTOCK, a UI professor of internal medicine, said he thought of the treatment after noticing that people in developing countries who are often infected with worms seem less susceptible to inflamed bowels.
http://www.boston.com/dailyglobe2/340/science/Thymus_transplants+.shtml

ARIZONA REPUBLIC, Dec. 5 -- One of the most respected high school football and basketball officials is Fritz Goreham, 65, of Scottsdale, Ariz. He began his career after graduating from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA law school in 1959 and came to Arizona in 1966. "It just makes you feel good, being out there and helping the kids," said Goreham, who also has worked Division I men's and women's basketball and for many years worked Suns' scrimmages during training camp. His daughter, Rebecca, is a high school official in Pennsylvania. The story appears on the paper's Web site at:
http://www.azcentral.com:80/sports/azetc/1205refs.shtml

DETROIT NEWS, Dec. 5 - A profile of U.S. Rep. David Bonior of Michigan, the second-ranking House Democrat, notes that he earned his bachelor's degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1967.
http://detnews.com:80/1999/metro/9912/04/12040016.htm

JERUSALEM (Israel) POST, Dec. 3 -- A story about author Sena Jeter Naslund's latest book, "Ahab's Wife: or, The Star-Gazer," says she attended the "University of Iowa's famed WRITERS' WORKSHOP." The story appeared in the Web version of the newspaper at:
http://www.jpost.com:80/com/Archive/03.Dec.1999/Books/Article-0.html
The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran Dec. 1 on the LOS ANGELES TIMES Web site.

LINCOLN (Neb.) JOURNAL STAR, Dec. 3 -- About a decade ago the federal government assembled a panel of experts to study the use of aborted fetal tissue in medical research. Its conclusion? "Their collective judgment was that a distinction can be made between abortion and the research value of tissue" from abortions, ROBERT WEIR, director of the Program of Biomedical Ethics at the University of Iowa, said Tuesday. Not all medical ethicists, however, agree with that finding.
http://www.journalstar.com:80/archives/120199/top/sto1

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Dec. 3 -- Sorting Things Out: Classification and Its Consequences, a book on the human impulse to classify things, mentions the Nursing Intervention Classification, a recent effort by nursing researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to categorize the range of tasks that nurses perform from day to day. The NIC gave the book's authors an opportunity to track a classification scheme in progress and the problems it confronts.
http://www.chronicle.com/weekly/v46/i15/15a02401.htm

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Dec. 3 -- DEIRDRE N. MCCLOSKEY, the prominent economist who has gotten lots of attention because of her change from he to she, has decided to leave the University of Iowa for the University of Illinois at Chicago. Disputing some of McCloskey's cited reasons for leaving, ROBERT FORSYTHE, senior associate dean of the Tippie College of Business at Iowa, says McCloskey never showed the university her offer from Illinois, and so Iowa couldn't make a counter offer. He also disputes the contention that Iowa wasn't interested in the kind of work she wants to do.
http://www.chronicle.com/weekly/v46/i15/15a01401.htm

OMAHA WORLD-HERALD, Dec. 2 -- University of Iowa researchers plan to begin testing a new AIDS vaccine on people, the first human trial performed in Iowa. JACK STAPLETON, a professor of internal medicine at Iowa, said the study will evaluate five people who are already infected with HIV and receiving treatment.

FOXNEWS.COM, Dec. 2 -- The death rate for people who suffer kidney failure can be cut up to 82 percent if they have a kidney transplant instead of remaining on dialysis, researchers report in a New England Journal of Medicine study. In an editorial, Dr. LAWRENCE G. HUNSICKER of the University of Iowa College of Medicine said the study may motivate people to donate a kidney to a loved one ''if they know that doing so will not only improve the quality of life for the recipient but also most likely prolong life.''

TOLEDO (Ohio) BLADE, Dec. 2 -- A story about feminist art pioneer Miriam Schapiro says she met her husband of 53 years, Paul Brach, when both were studying art at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in the late 1940s.
http://www.toledoblade.com:80/editorial/art/9l02art.htm

BOSTON GLOBE.COM, Dec. 2 -- The death rate for people who suffer kidney failure can be cut up to 82 percent if they have a kidney transplant instead of remaining on dialysis, researchers report in a New England Journal of Medicine study. In an editorial, Dr. LAWRENCE G. HUNSICKER of the University of Iowa College of Medicine, said the study may motivate people to donate a kidney to a loved one ''if they know that doing so will not only improve the quality of life for the recipient but also most likely prolong life.'' The REUTERS story also ran Dec. 2 on the YAHOO!NEWS Web site at:
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/19991202/sc/health_kidneys_8.html
The Reuters story also ran Dec. 2 on the GO NETWORK news Web site at:
http://infoseek.go.com/Content?arn=a3871romta-19991201&qt=%2BReuters+%2B%22University+of+Iowa%22&sv=IS&lk=noframes&col=NX&kt=A&ak=news1486
A UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL version of the story ran Dec. 1 on the EXCITE NEWS Web site.

ARKANSAS DEMOCRAT-GAZETTE, Dec. 2 -- Arkansas State University's performing arts center has a new director who has performed at the White House and has worked throughout Europe. Jerome Biebesheimer will take over the Fowler Center on Jan. 1. He holds two master of fine arts degrees from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The story appears in the Web version of the newspaper.

SLATE, Dec. 1 -- In a diary of a day in her new post at the University of Illinois, Chicago, DEIRDRE MCCLOSKEY talks about her reasons for leaving the University of Iowa, where she was an economics professor for 19 years. "I resigned from the University of Iowa last week for a rising pile of reasons: Chiefly, the administration at Iowa was neglecting me (professors always feel neglected, because their jobs don't trigger a hierarchy of praise, and most university administrators are idiotically stingy with praise anyway)."
http://www.slate.com:80/diary/99-11-29/diary.asp?iMsg=3

MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE.COM, Dec. 1 -- A story about author Sena Jeter Naslund's novel Ahab' s Wife or, The Star Gazer, which aspires to be a literary companion to Herman Melville' s literary classic, first read Moby Dick as a teenager growing up in Birmingham, Ala. As a graduate student of creative writing at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA she drew her formative literary influences from Melville, as well as from novels like Charlotte Bronte' s Jane Eyre and Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights. The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran Dec. 1 on the NEW YORK TIMES Web site.

BOSTON GLOBE.COM, Dec. 1 -- A team of University of Iowa Health Care investigators has advanced understanding of how gene therapy might effectively treat the serious lung function loss associated with cystic fibrosis (CF). PAUL MCCRAY, M.D., UI associate professor of pediatrics, was co-principal investigator of the study. In addition, UI investigators included BEVERLY DAVIDSON, Ph.D., associate professor of internal medicine and director of the Gene Transfer Vector Core; GUOSHUN WANG, Ph.D., research scientist in pediatrics; and JOSEPH ZABNER, M.D., assistant professor of internal medicine.

SYLLABUS MAGAZINE (San Jose, Calif.), December 1999 -- A brief item on the University of Iowa VIRTUAL HOSPITAL describes it has a digital health sciences laboratory designed to meet the needs of health care providers and patients. The goal of the digital library is to make the Internet a useful medical reference and health promotion tool.

DIAGNOSTIC IMAGING, December 1999 -- Using MRI, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers may have determined that damage to a specific section of the brain promotes antisocial behavior. The researchers studied two people who had suffered injuries to the prefrontal cortex as infants.

FABULA MAGAZINE, December 1999 -- Many men who have breasts (approximately 40 percent) choose to have them removed, according to a study by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PLASTIC SURGERY DEPARTMENT cited in an article about gynecomastia.

DISCOVER, December 1999 -- People who live in developing countries often have parasitic worms in their intestines. On the other hand, they rarely get inflammatory bowel diseases such as ulcerative colitis. Immunoparasitologist JOEL WEINSTOCK of the University of Iowa suspected a connection, so he asked six patients with these diseases to quaff a brew of worm eggs. Five of the six went into complete remission within three weeks and stayed symptom-free for up to five months.

REASON, December 1999 -- University of Iowa economics professor DEIRDRE MCCLOSKEY's book "Crossing" is excerpted in the magazine.
http://www.reasonmag.com:80/9912/fe.dm.from.html

TIME: THE PRINCETON REVIEW, Annual 1999 -- MICHAEL BARRON, director of admissions at the University of Iowa, is quoted in this special edition of the magazine titled "The Best College For You." Barron's advice to students contemplating schools is to make more than a "drive-by" glance. Instead of exploring the insides of class buildings and dorms, visitors are often taken on what Barron calls the "money walk" -- a formal tour through the manicured parts of the campus. Barron suggests setting up a prearranged meeting with a faculty member from the department in which a student may want to study. "Many prospective students opt to sit in on a class or two, but classes can be hit or miss," Barron warns.

GREAT HOMES, 1999 -- An article features the whimsical "wizard's house" owned by an Iowa City couple who also work at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Eric Hoffman is a physiologist whose research focuses on using non-invasive imaging techniques to study the heart and lungs. His wife, Deanna Johnson-Hoffman, has a doctorate in Spanish literature and teaches at the university.

GREAT HOMES, 1999 -- A story about Bruce and Tancy Becker, who bought a Queen Anne Late Victorian built in 1893, says Tancy received an MA in vocal performance and pedagogy from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA before embarking on a career as an opera singer.

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