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August, 1999

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NEW YORK TIMES, Aug. 31 -- JOEL WEINSTOCK, M.D., of the University of Iowa College of Medicine, is identified as the lead researcher in a study in which the eggs of parasitic worms were ingested by patients to treat acute, chronic inflammatory bowel disease. "Every one of those patients is begging to be re-treated," said Weinstock. The preliminary results of the study, which made a big splash at an American Gastroenterological Association conference in May, could offer hope for the hundreds of thousands of Americans who suffer from inflammatory bowel diseases, mainly Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, which cause chronic and often bloody diarrhea, and weight loss.
http://www.nytimes.com/library/national/science/083199hth-parasitic-worms.html

MILWAUKEE JOURNAL-SENTINEL, Aug. 31 -- ANN RHODES, University of Iowa vice president for university relations, expressed regret in a story about extortion charges against former Iowa football player RYAN LOFTIN. "I wish like crazy none of this would have happened," Rhodes said. "Personally, I'd like very much to stop talking about it, but this is where we are.'' According to charges filed by the Johnson County attorney's office, first-year Iowa coach KIRK FERENTZ received a letter signed by Ryan Loftin that threatened to expose NCAA rules violations and share information about the football team to opponents if Loftin's scholarship, which was lifted earlier this month, was not restored.
http://www.jsonline.com//badger/ap/aug99/ap-fbc-loftin-exto083199.asp
Rhodes is also quoted in another version of the story that ran Aug. 31 on the FOXNEWS Web site at:
http://www.foxnews.com/js_index.sml?content=/sports/wires2/0831/s_ap_0831_49.sml
Another version of the ASSOCIATED PRESS story ran Aug. 31 on the SPORTS ALIVE Web site at:
http://sports.al.com/cgi-bin/al_sview.pl?/var/www/sportsflash/AP/Stream-Parsed/FOOTBALL/s0201_PM_FBC--Loftin-Extortion
An earlier version of an Associated Press story on this subject ran Aug. 29 on the CNN/SPORTS ILLUSTRATED Web site at:
http://www.cnnsi.com/football/college/news/1999/08/29/iowa_extortion_ap/index.html

ASBURY PARK PRESS, Aug. 31 -- RICHARD D. WILLIAMS, professor and chairman of urology at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, said in an article on Tour de France cyclist and testicular cancer survivor Lance Armstrong that young people "don't even put cancer on their radar screen as an issue to be concerned about, because they're young -- and in their minds -- invincible."

CBS.COM, Aug. 31 - Many doctors do not make use of the hundreds of guidelines available to help diagnose asthma. When UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers tested doctors' understanding of the guidelines, a group of 108 doctors-20 of them asthma specialists-got a mean score of just 60 percent.

AHA NEWS, Aug. 30 -- LAWRENCE HUNSICKER, M.D., organ transplant director at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, is mentioned in an article on an Office of Inspector General report on local access to organ transplantation.

LOS ANGELES TIMES, Aug. 30 -- INGRID NYGAARD, associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Iowa, said many women who suffer from incontinence during sports or other activities are unaware that help exists. "It's important not to give up exercise, since one risk factor for stress incontinence is being overweight," says Nygaard, whose study of 290 female exercisers ages 17 to 68 found that one in three leaked during exercise. http://www.latimes.com/search/findcgi?action=View&VdkVgwKey=%2E%2E%2F%2E%2E%2Fvol7%2FCNS%5FDAYS%2F990830%2Ft000077370%2Ehtml&DocOffset=1&DocsFound=4&QueryZip=%22University+of+Iowa%22&Collection=Hunter&SortSpec=Modified+Desc&ViewTemplate=search3%2Ehts

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, Aug. 30 -- In the latest poll conducted by the Iowa Social Science Institute at the University of Iowa, Vice President and presidential candidate Al Gore led challenger Bill Bradley by more than 30 percentage points. "Gore is significantly ahead, but there is a bit of a narrowing of the gap as more people start to learn a little bit about Bill Bradley," said ARTHUR MILLER, professor of political science at the University of Iowa and director of the institute.

http://www2.startribune.com/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisStory=80879630

BOSTON GLOBE, Aug. 30 -- Adding to a growing body of evidence that workplace stress is harmful, researchers have linked job strain with higher rates of heart disease and other physical ailments, and are exploring the psychological effects of working long hours or being disenchanted with a job. Last week in Boston, University of Iowa researcher CYNTHIA A. BONEBRIGHT reported finding that ''workaholics'' -- people who work long hours, whether out of enthusiasm for the job or not -- have more conflicts between work and family, and less satisfaction and purpose in life.
http://www.boston.com/dailyglobe2/242/science/Jobs_don_t_kill_people_but_stress_in_the_workplace_can+.shtml

LINCOLN (Neb.) JOURNAL STAR, Aug. 29 - An article about steps universities are taking to curb binge drinking among students mentions that UNIVERSITY OF IOWA officials have created alcohol-free tailgating areas and turned down a contract from a beer company to sponsor weekly coaches' television shows.
http://www.journalstar.com:80/archives/082999/top/stox

CBS.COM, Aug. 29 -- First-year University of Iowa football coach KIRK FERENTZ declined comment for an article reporting that former Hawkeye linebacker Ryan Loftin was arrested and charged Saturday with felony extortion and misdemeanor fifth-degree theft. Loftin is accused of trying to blackmail the school into giving him back his scholarship after he left the team.
http://www.cbs.com/flat/story_180492.html
The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran Aug. 29 on the FOXNEWS.COM web site at:
http://www.foxnews.com/js_index.sml?content=/sports/wires2/0829/s_ap_0829_266.sml
The same Associated Press article ran Aug. 29 on the SPORTSLINE web site at:
http://www.sportsline.com/u/ce/multi/0,1329,1293287_56,00.html
The same Associated Press article ran Aug. 30 in the CHICAGO TRIBUNE.

LOS ANGELES TIMES, Aug. 29 -- A feature on the University of California-Los Angeles Fowler Museum's new chief curator, Mary Nooter Roberts, mentions that she and her husband, anthropologist Allen F. Roberts, moved to Iowa a year after the museum opened because he was teaching at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. They remained there until recently, when both got appointments at UCLA.

PALM BEACH POST, Aug. 29 -- JAY RUBINSTEIN, assistant professor of otolaryngology at the University of Iowa, says the human ear was not built to withstand the loud, chronic noise of modern life. He said family members are usually the first to notice hearing loss in a loved one. "The television is louder. They are constantly asked to repeat things," he said.

DENVER POST, Aug. 29 -- EDWARD MASON, who began doing gastric bypasses at the University of Iowa in the 1960s, pioneered modern day weight-loss surgery, which today is categorized as "simple" or "complex." Simple surgery makes the stomach smaller so less food can be eaten. Complex surgery does that plus diverts some of the intestines so less food can be absorbed.

THE DAILY OKLAHOMAN, Aug. 28 -- ROBERT SPANHEIMER, an endocrinologist at the University of Iowa Medical School, is quoted in a story about a bone-density test that monitors osteoporosis. "This really is a major advance," Spanheimer said. "Even with all the medications we have, it's still hard to build bone. But if we can catch people before they've lost bone, we can do a lot to prevent further loss."

FOXNEWS.COM, Aug. 28 -- Presented with a complicated scene, the human brain processes visual information serially at high speeds, rather than all at once, according to a report in the Aug. 26 issue of Nature written by Professors STEVEN LUCK and GEOFFREY WOODMAN of the University of Iowa. The finding may lead to new treatments for diseases affecting the brain, and to new navigational tools, reports the REUTERS news story.
http://www.foxnews.com/js_index.sml?content=/health/082899/brainvision.sml

NEW YORK TIMES, Aug. 27 -- A report recounting the news of the day on Aug. 27, 1962, mentions that JAMES A. VAN ALLEN, the foremost researcher on radiation belts near the earth and a faculty member at the State University of Iowa, was a collaborator in a charged-particle experiment aboard the Mariner II spacecraft.
http://www.nytimes.com/learning/general/onthisday/990827onthisday_big.html

MCCALL'S, Aug. 27 -- Six colleges nationwide, including the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, received a five-year grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to fund Project IMPACT, a coalition of staff, students, faculty and community leaders who are trying to reduce binge drinking among students. The other schools are Lehigh University, the University of Wisconsin, University of Delaware, University of Colorado at Boulder and University of Vermont.

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, Aug. 26 -- Among the sports-related displays at the Minnesota State Fair this year is Floyd of Rosedale, the bronze pig won in the University of Minnesota's victory over the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA last year.
http://www.startribune.com/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=GOPH26&date=26-Aug-1999&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, Aug. 25 -- An article about Title IX mentions that at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA the new women's crew team has a budget of $440,000, boasting 12 apportionable scholarships, new boats and three paid coaches. Meanwhile, men's crew -- a club sport -- struggles to make do with a stipend of $1,500 and secondhand boats.
http://www.startribune.com/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=KER25&date=25-Aug-1999&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, Aug. 25 -- A feature on Robert Homma, a partner in Dimson Homma, a Manhattan shop that sells Ming furniture, celadon porcelain and rare live birds, says the 51-year-old, third-generation Japanese-American studied painting at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in the 1970s.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/1999/08/25/HO54680.DTL

WIRED, Aug. 24 -- GEORGE HERBERT, general manager of the University of Iowa bookstore, says the bookstore opened its Web site recently. "One of our strategic initiatives is melding a brick and mortar location and virtual location to try and provide service to [our] customers," said Herbert.
http://www.wired.com/news/news/culture/story/21358.html

ABC WORLD NEWS TONIGHT, Aug. 24 -- A story about so-called "pork barrel" spending -- that is, research funding secured by members of Congress for universities in their home states -- says that the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA received $8 million in federal funding for the National Advanced Driving Simulator (NADS).

FORBES, Aug. 23 -- Iowa City, which the article points out is home to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is one of several places within Iowa that is becoming increasingly attractive to people fleeing larger metropolises, especially those in the technology industry.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Aug. 24 -- Author David Michael Kaplan, who recently won the $5,000 top prize in this year's Nelson Algren Awards for Short Fiction, honed his craft at the famed IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, as did two other Algren prize winners -- Kevin Brockmeier and Mary O'Connell.

OMAHA (Neb.) WORLD-HERALD, Aug. 24 -- University of Iowa economics researchers BETH INGRAM and GEORGE NEUMANN have found that verbal and math skills have become increasingly important to workers over the past 25 years while the importance of clerical skills has decreased. The researchers found that college-educated workers in technical jobs receive the best return in wages, although skilled workers with just a high school degree also saw wage gains.

VARIETY NEWSPAPER, Aug. 23-29 -- A story about playwright Rebecca Gilman, whose first professional production in New York was to be her play "Spinning Into Butter," says she holds a master's in fine arts from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.

CHARLESTON (S.C.) POST AND COURIER, Aug. 23 -- A story about how farm hopes are fading as prices falter mentions that the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA was to begin offering annual grants of as much as $1,000 to students of hard-pressed farm families.

NATIONAL JOURNAL, Aug. 23 -- GOP presidential hopeful Dan Quayle isn't giving up the race, despite a poor showing in the IOWA ELECTRONICS MARKET (IEM). In the IEM, described in the article as a computerized mechanism for college students and political junkies to trade "shares" in political candidates, Quayle stock slipped to 0.3 cents, from 2 cents as recently as Aug. 1.

USA TODAY, Aug. 23 -- Bill Sornsin, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA undergraduate and ex-Microsoft Network engineering coordinator, is now chief technology officer for Rivals.com, described as an upstart sporting news Web site for sports fans dissatisfied with ESPN and CBS SportsLine. "Rivals.com seeks to play on fans' loyalties to favorite teams, rather than cover general sports news," Sornsin said.
http://www.usatoday.com/life/cyber/tech/ctf918.htm

NANDO TIMES (N.C.), Aug. 23 -- SHANNON NELSON, a member of the University of Iowa Animal Rights Coalition, speaks out against an Iowa City plan to have the deer population thinned by sharpshooters. "There are other alternatives, such as educating the public on what kinds of plants deer don't like to eat, or putting more reflectors up on roadways, that should be looked at," Nelson said in this Associated Press article.
http://www.nando.com/noframes/story/0,2107,84961-134249-890731-0,00.html

BALTIMORE SUN, Aug. 22 -- The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS is publishing "Boomer Girls: Poems by Women from the Baby Boom Generation," edited by Pamela Gemin and Paul Sergi.

ORLANDO SENTINEL, Aug. 22 -- SHANNON NELSON, a member of the University of Iowa Animal Rights Coalition, speaks out against an Iowa City plan to have the deer population thinned by sharpshooters. "There are other alternatives, such as educating the public on what kinds of plants deer don't like to eat, or putting more reflectors up on roadways, that should be looked at," Nelson said in this ASSOCIATED PRESS article. The same Associted Press article ran Aug. 22 in the COLUMBUS DISPATCH and Aug. 15 in the SALT LAKE TRIBUNE.

SAN ANTONIO EXPRESS-NEWS, Aug. 22 -- A story about the growing number of colleges and universities where fraternities and sororities are required to be alcohol-free includes the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.

COLUMBUS (Ohio) DISPATCH, Aug. 22 -- A former Iowa football player who quit the team earlier this month now says he didn't leave voluntarily. Linebacker RYAN LOFTIN also accused the school of NCAA violations regarding off-season workouts. A University of Iowa spokeswoman said the athletics department would investigate allegations of NCAA rules violations and that she has tried to meet with Loftin to discuss his concerns.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Aug. 22 -- JACK ROSAZZA, director of the University of Iowa's Center for Biocatalysis and Bioprocessing, is quoted in an article that explores the increase in patent donations to universities. Earlier this year, E.I. DuPont Nemours & Co. donated nine patents to the University of Iowa. "It's a great matching of intellectual wits from the academic and the industrial worlds," said Rosazza.

BALTIMORE SUN, Aug. 22 -- An article that discusses some of the poetry books published in 1999 mentions "Boomer Girls: Poems by Women from the Baby Boom Generation," which was edited by Pamela Gemin and Paul Sergi and published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS. The author said the book supplies an antidote to "Poems for the People" with poems by nearly 100 women of that certain age, ranging from the seldom-heard to notables like Sandy Cisneros, Lynn Emanuel, Joy Harjo and Maryland's own Kathy Mangan.
http://www.sunspot.net/cgi-bin/editorial/story.cgi?section=archive&storyid= 1150140213395

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Aug. 22 -- University of Iowa Economics Professor DEIRDRE (formerly Donald) MCCLOSKEY is among a string of new faculty recruits by the University of Illinois-Chicago. The article said McCloskey's appointment is only through the fall term, but UIC officials have made it known they hope to recruit her to a permanent position. Also quoted in the story is Craig Dunphey, 23, a second-year graduate student. "She is one of the most brilliant professors we have in (the business school) building," Dunphey said.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Aug. 21 -- An article about former Chicago Bulls guard Bobby Hansen mentions that he played college basketball at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and worked as a radio analyst for Iowa games after retiring from the NBA.

SAN ANTONIO EXPRESS-NEWS, Aug. 21 - Some 16 schools around the country, including the University of Iowa, have banned alcohol from fraternity houses, according to the National Inter-Fraternity Council. "Some members support it, and others are at the other extreme," said Steve Zizzo, assistant executive vice-president at the National Inter-Fraternity Council. "But it seems to work. I talked to the Greek advisor at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, and he said the number of people at rush week is up, problems are down - especially problems related to alcohol."

BINGHAMTON PRESS & SUN-BULLETIN (N.Y.), Aug. 20 -- The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's ranking by U.S. News and World Report as 21st best among the top 25 public colleges and universities is mentioned in an article about Binghamton University, which ranked 22nd along with five other universities.

AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMEN, Aug. 20 -- BRUCE GRONBECK, a University of Iowa professor of communication studies, said the question about Republican presidential hopeful and Texas Gov. George W. Bush will cloud his campaign until he answers it. "As long as journalists pursue it, as long as it is an issue, it is going to dog him," Gronbeck said. "And the longer it dogs him, the more important it becomes."

KANSAS CITY STAR, Aug. 19 -- Just prior to the Iowa Straw Poll, Republican presidential hopeful Elizabeth Dole flew to Iowa City to greet 300 Delta Delta Delta sorority sisters from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA who then took buses to the poll. Tri-Delt efforts accounted for more than 600 of Dole's 3,400 votes. Dole placed third in the poll.

REUTERS, Aug. 19 -- SCOTT PAGE and ARTHUR MILLER, both political science professors at the University of Iowa, are quoted in a story about White House candidate Elizabeth Dole's political prospects after coming in third in the recent Iowa Straw Poll. "She's earned a second look,'' said Page. Miller said Texas Gov. and Dole rival George W. Bush, while coming in first in the poll, failed to win by a landslide -- just 31 percent of the votes to Steve Forbes' 21 percent and Dole's 14 percent. "George W. Bush did not have a good day,'' said Miller. The article ran on Yahoo's news website at:
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/19990819/pl/politics_fallout_2.html
The same article also ran on the LYCOS website and the SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS.

WALL STREET JOURNAL, Aug. 17 - An item about the dire financial situation for farmers mentions that the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA this fall will begin offering annual grants of as much as $1,000 to students of hard-pressed farm families.

NEW YORK TIMES, Aug. 17 - On the morning of the Iowa Straw Poll, Elizabeth Dole flew to Iowa City to greet 300 fraternity and sorority members from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA before they boarded buses to Ames, where the poll was held. The bus caravan, paid for by the Dole campaign, was organized by the UI Tri-Delta chapter.

SLATE, Aug. 17 -- As part of its ongoing coverage of the 2000 presidential election, Slate will run daily results from the University of Iowa's IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKET alongside its own Pundits Index. The IEM trades "stock" in candidates. As Slate writes: "It's slightly complicated, but the point is to see if the invisible hand of capitalism can beat the gasbags at predicting election results."
http://www.slate.com:80/Readme/99-08-17/Readme.asp

NEWSDAY, Aug. 17 -- GEORGE NEUMANN, an economics professor at the University of Iowa, is quoted about a story on the school's Iowa Electronic Markets (IEM), which offers traders the opportunity to buy and sell contracts that predict the outcome of national and international elections. Neumann says the online markets "have done spectacularly well at forecasting who's going to win and by how much," compared with public opinion polls.

ANNALS OF INTERNAL MEDICINE, Aug. 17 -- ANTONIO DAMASIO, M.D., Ph.D., of the University of Iowa College of Medicine's department of neurology, gave an address at the National Academy of Scientists in Washington D.C. in April. Damasio noted that the Decade of the Brain has turned out to be, in many respects, the Decade of the Brain Behind the Mind. "In an effort that continues to gain momentum, virtually all the functions studied in traditional psychology -- perception, learning and memory, language, emotion, decision making, creativity -- are being understood in terms of their brain underpinnings," Damasio said.

NEWSDAY, Aug. 17 -- JAY RUBINSTEIN, Assistant professor of otolaryngology at the University of Iowa, said the human ear was not built to withstand the loud, chronic noise of modern life. He said family members are usually the first to notice hearing loss in a loved one.

OMAHA WORLD-HERALD, Aug. 16 -- In the Iowa Straw Poll, Republican hopeful Gary Bauer showed he had a strong campaign organization, said ART MILLER, a professor of political science at the University of Iowa. "Bauer turns out to be the big winner," Miller said. "It spells big trouble for George Bush."

HARTFORD COURANT, Aug. 16 -- DEANNA HURST, who counsels students as director of business and liberal arts placement for the University of Iowa, is quoted in a story about using e-mail in job searches. GEORGE MCCRORY, associate editor for University News Services, is also quoted about his own experiences using e-mail in job hunts.

LOS ANGELES TIMES, Aug. 16 -- Stephen Brogden, who has a bachelor's degree in English and master's degree in library science from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is profiled about his recent appointment as interim director of the Thousand Oaks Library in California.

PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, Aug. 16 - The outcome of the Iowa Straw Poll reflects a divide within the Republican Party. Roughly half of the votes went to establishment candidates with the other half going to party conservatives. ARTHUR MILLER, a UI political science professor, said late Saturday night: "It's a divide between the pragmatists and the moralists, and it will keep appearing down the road. No matter how much money and resources Bush has, he is going to have to confront it at some point, because, long-term, his relations with the [movement conservatives] will be a major factor in Republican politics next year."
http://www.phillynews.com/inquirer/99/Aug/16/front_page/IOWA16.htm

LOS ANGELES TIMES, Aug. 16 - A column about recent innovations in health care mentions the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study that found that patients who suffer from inflammatory bowel diseases can get relief by ingesting a certain type of parasitic worm.

SAN DIEGO UNION-TRIBUNE, Aug. 15 - The Iowa Straw Poll results will likely lead some candidates to rethink their bid for the Republican presidential nomination. "The straw poll results will end up sucking the blood out of a lot of campaigns," said ARTHUR MILLER, a UI professor of political science.

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR, Aug. 15 - Although Texas Gov. George Bush won Saturday's Republican Straw Poll in Ames, some say that considering the enormous amount of resources his campaign dedicated to the run up to the poll, Bush didn't do as well as he should have in winning only 31 percent of the vote. "He didn't even get close to 50 percent," says ARTHUR MILLER, a UI political science professor.
http://www.csmonitor.com/durable/1999/08/16/fp3s1-csm.shtml

CLEARWATERS QUARTERLY, Aug. 15 -- UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers found an unusually high rate of respiratory problems among residents living within a three-kilometer radius of a 4,000-sow facility, as compared to a control group of residents living in areas with minimal livestock production.

INFORMATION TODAY, Aug. 15 -- BARBARA I. DEWEY, director of information and search services at the University of Iowa Libraries, was awarded an outstanding-paper prize by the Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education. Her paper was titled "Scaling Information Literacy at the University of Iowa: Web-Based Approaches and Partnerships."

ITS WORLD, Aug. 15 -- Researchers from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA tested "lane departure" warning technology intended to keep commercial trucks in their lane. A magnetic pickup on a snowplow detected the position of the lane marking tape and used a display in the cab to show the truck's position relative to the center of the lane. A full system evaluation will take place during the '99-'00 winter driving season.

PSYCHOLOGY TODAY, Aug. 15 -- DEBRA JOHNSON, Ph.D., a research scientist at the University of Iowa, is co-author of a study that shows that introverts and extroverts show activity in different brain structures which mirror the wildly opposing aspects of their personalities.

MSNBC, Aug. 14 -- A story on the Iowa Straw Poll quotes two members of the Delta Delta Delta sorority at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA who during an earlier breakfast pep talk listened to Republican presidential hopeful Elizabeth Dole, a fellow "Tri-Delt." "She seemed really knowledgeable and personable, and she seemed to really care about college students," said 21-year-old AUTUMN RASNES, a senior at the university. Another student, 20-year-old LINDSEY VOERJEN, said, "I think the thing that most impressed me was when she was talking about women. There has not been a woman president yet, and you know it is just exciting for me to see her in this position and that is how she touched me."
http://www.msnbc.com/news/300714.asp

PEDIATRIC NURSING, Aug. 15 -- PERLE SLAVIK COWEN, Ph.D., R.N., an associate professor in the University of Iowa College of Nursing, is the author of an article on child neglect. "The social problem of child maltreatment has come to be predominantly defined as physical child abuse, with child neglect being treated as an appendage problem," Cowen writes.

PUBLIC LIBRARIES, Aug. 15 -- SHARON L. BAKER, associate professor in the University of Iowa School of Library and Information Science, is the author of an article titled "Cooperative Questioning for the Sake of Innovation."

THE LANCET (New York), Aug. 14 -- The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's VIRTUAL HOSPITAL is listed as a resource for people wanting to know what medications or immunizations to take when traveling outside the area.

SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, Aug. 14 -- During the Iowa Straw Poll, Republican presidential hopeful and Texas Gov. George W. Bush brought in former pro football star Roger Staubach and popular former University of Iowa football Coach HAYDEN FRY. Fry was the role model for the television series ``Coach'' and is a transplanted Texan.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/1999/08/14/politics1834EDT0577.DTL

HARTFORD COURANT, Aug. 13 - Many campaign watchers expected Vice President Al Gore to effortlessly win the "money primary" when fund-raising totals were in for the first six months. Instead, Bill Bradley wound up in Gore's financial league, giving him new credibility. "Bradley now was the rallying point for everyone with doubts about Gore," said CARY COVINGTON, UI associate professor of political science.

MIAMI HERALD, Aug. 13 - Iowans sample an array of presidential prospects well before most of America tunes in, and the choices they make this weekend in the Iowa Straw Poll, and again this winter in the 2000 caucuses, will significantly narrow the choices the rest of the nation has in the 2000 election. "People can feel comfortable about Iowans making decisions," says PEVERILL SQUIRE, a professor of political science at the University of Iowa. "We do have some sense of retail politics. If you want, you can see these [candidates] all the time. I came from California, where you see them on TV."

BOSTON BUSINESS JOURNAL, Aug. 12 -- Doctors may be able to use bacterial DNA to turn the human immune system against cancer and other diseases, according to research by ARTHUR KRIEG, professor of internal medicine at the University of Iowa. The research, which was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences journal, found that the DNA affects dendritic cells -- the master control cells in the immune system. Using the bacterial DNA -- called CpG DNA -- on human cells in a laboratory, the researchers at the University of Iowa were able to trigger a response.

ST. PAUL PIONEER PRESS, Aug. 12 -- University of Iowa entomologist TOM BAKER is trying to put wasps to work as mine detectors. He said he thinks a breed of small parasitic wasps -- not the stinging kind -- might be trained to associated certain odors, like explosives, with food.

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR, Aug. 12 - The Iowa Straw Poll may be non-binding, but it is an important political litmus test. Candidates trying to lure Iowans to Ames on Saturday by displaying their coffers of campaign donations, however, may find their strategy backfiring. "There's an undercurrent of anti-money out there," says ARTHUR MILLER, a UI political science professor. "They're willing to take the goodies - they say they hope the food is good! - but they're repulsed by all the money that's being spent."
http://www.csmonitor.com/durable/1999/08/12/fp3s1-csm.shtml

SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, Aug. 12 -- Among the celebrities who will be on hand for Saturday's Iowa Straw Poll is HAYDEN FRY, "the University of Iowa's legendary football coach," who will be a guest of Texas Gov. George W. Bush.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/1999/08/12/ MN47086.DTL

An ASSOCIATED PRESS article that mentions Fry's Straw Poll attendance appeared in the Aug. 11 (Salt Lake City) DESERET NEWS:
http://deseretnews.com:80/dn/view/0,1249,110002779,00.html

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR, Aug. 11 -- JOEL BARKAN, a UI political science professor, contributed an op-ed piece about the appointment of Richard Leakey as head of civil service in Kenya. "As the no-nonsense director of Kenya Wildlife Services, the world-famous paleontologist reduced the poaching of Kenya's elephants," Barkan writes. "The hope is that he will now reduce the poaching of the public purse."
http://www.csmonitor.com/durable/1999/08/11/fp9s1-csm.shtml

SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER, Aug. 10 - An ASSOCIATED PRESS story about the upcoming Iowa Straw Poll notes that among the celebrities being brought in by Texas Gov. George W. Bush is HAYDEN FRY, the recently retired UI football coach who is "a very popular transplanted Texan."
http://www.seattlep-i.com:80/national/iowa11.shtml
The same AP article ran Aug. 10 on the Internet news service NANDO TIMES.

CAPITAL DISTRICT BUSINESS REVIEW, Aug. 9 -- A story about film technology recently donated to the Renssalaer Polytechnic Institute by Dow Chemical Co. mentions that DuPont recently gave the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA part of $64 million in patents for technology.
http://www.amcity.com:80/albany/stories/1999/08/09/story7.html

CBS.COM, Aug. 9 -- Regular doses of worms might help cure people of inflammatory bowel disease by combating the absence of intestinal parasites in our sterile world, according to the results of a study led by University of Iowa professor of internal medicine JOEL WEINSTOCK and published in a recent issue of New Scientist magazine. Researchers fed six inflammatory bowel disease sufferers a drink containing microscopic eggs of a species of intestinal worm that does not normally affect people. The results were so dramatic that he is planning a larger trial later this year.

SCIENCE DAILY, Aug. 9 - A team of UNIVERSITY OF IOWA engineers is studying how conventional airbags work in order to help researchers design safer airbags for new cars and trucks. P. Barry Butler and L.D. Chen, professors of mechanical engineering and project co-principal investigators, are in the final year of a three-year, $369,000 General Motors grant funded through the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Chen says that the primary goal of the UI project is to understand the physics of auto airbags.
http://www.sciencedaily.com:80/releases/1999/08/990809081306.htm

THE IRISH TIMES, Aug. 9 -- Regular doses of worms might help cure people of inflammatory bowel disease by combating the absence of intestinal parasites in our sterile world, JOEL WEINSTOCK of the University of Iowa told New Scientist magazine. Weinstock and his colleagues fed six inflammatory bowel disease sufferers a drink containing microscopic eggs of a species of intestinal worm that does not normally affect people. The results were so dramatic that he is planning a larger trial later this year. Various versions of this story also were reported Aug. 5 by UPI in its "Domestic News/Health Tips"; the CALGARY HERALD; THE HERALD (Glasgow); THE JOURNAL (Newcastle); THE OTTAWA CITIZEN; THE VANCOUVER SUN and WESTERN DAILY PRESS; on Aug. 6 by THE INDEPENDENT (London); on Aug. 7 by the ASSOCIATED PRESS state and local wire service and in NEW SCIENTIST. The story also received broadcast coverage, including Aug. 4 by KCOP-TV (UPN) in Los Angeles; WLTV-TV (Univision) in Miami; on Aug. 6 by KMBC-TV (ABC) in Kansas City; WSYX-TV (ABC) in Columbus and KTNV-TV (ABC) in Las Vegas; on Aug. 8 by the ALL NEWS CHANNEL; Aug. 9 by WLS-TV (ABC) in Chicago; KTRK-TV (ABC) in Houston; KOMO-TV (ABC) in Seattle/Tacoma; WRTV-TV (ABC) in Indianapolis; WTNH-TV (ABC) in Hartford/New Haven; WGGB-TV (ABC) in Springfield/Holyoke; KOCO-TV (ABC) in Oklahoma City; WPBF-TV (ABC) in West Palm Beach/Fort Myers; WJRT-TV (ABC) in Flint/Saginaw; KNXV-TV (ABC) in Phoenix; WGNO-TV (ABC) in New Orleans; WOKR-TV (ABC) in Rochester, N.Y.; WROC-TV (CBS) in Rochester, N.Y; and on Aug. 10 by WRTV-TV (ABC) in Indianapolis; WSOC-TV (ABC) in Charlotte; KNXV-TV (ABC) in Phoenix and WTAE-TV (ABC) in Pittsburgh.

HEALTHSCOUT, Aug. 9 -- Scientists with the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA believe they understand part of what causes progeria, a disease that ages children rapidly, often killing them before they reach 14. The UI researchers found that people with progeria are born with a deficiency in two enzymes that protect cells against damage from oxidative chemicals, also known as free radicals. The team eventually plans to use a genetically engineered virus to deliver genes for the two enzymes into progeria patients to produce more of the protective enzymes.

EDMONTON JOURNAL, Aug. 9 -- Regular doses of worms might help cure people of inflammatory bowel disease by combating the absence of intestinal parasites in our sterile world, according to the results of a study led by University of Iowa professor of internal medicine JOEL WEINSTOCK and published in a recent issue of New Scientist magazine. Researchers fed six inflammatory bowel disease sufferers a drink containing microscopic eggs of a species of intestinal worm that does not normally affect people. The results were so dramatic that he is planning a larger trial later this year. The same REUTERS story ran Aug. 5 in THE GLOBE & MAIL (Toronto).

OMAHA (Neb.) WORLD-HERALD, Aug. 9 -- MARY SUE COLEMAN, president of the University of Iowa, is quoted in a story that says the school will provide interest-free loans for tuition and fees this school year for students from cash-strapped farm families through its Farm Access Program. "We started thinking about it a couple months ago as we watched what was happening to some of the farm prices," Coleman said. Also quoted is CATHERINE WILCOX, associate director of student financial aid.

THE STAR-LEDGER (Newark, N.J.), Aug. 9 -- PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist at the University of Iowa, said the Iowa Straw Poll was "a good opportunity to show how well candidates can mobilize supporters."

CINCINNATI ENQUIRER, Aug. 8 -- A study at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE looked at patients whose two-year storage period for frozen embryos had expired. When give the options of disposal, donation for research, donation for adoption or continued storage, just over half decided to continue storage. Eighteen percent chose to discard them, 11 percent donated them for research and 20 percent donated them for adoption.

VIDEO STORE MAGAZINE, Aug. 7 -- HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a University of Iowa professor of law who's considered "one of the leading experts on antitrust litigation in the country," says there's nothing simple or easy about proving an antitrust case. Hovenkamp is quoted extensively in the story, which focuses on a recent antitrust lawsuit filed against Blockbuster Video and the major Hollywood studios.

OMAHA WORLD-HERALD, Aug. 6 -- Some residents who live near a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA incinerator that is used to burn animal carcasses after medical research fear it gives off radiation and want it shut down. Many of the carcasses, which were used for cardiovascular research, were exposed to radiation. Officials said the incinerator is safe.

NEW YORK DAILY NEWS, Aug. 5 -- An article on the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS (IEM) says the University of Iowa Web site offers an online futures market where speculators can buy shares in various political races, including the New York Senate race between Rudy Giuliani and First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton.

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Aug. 5 -- Mentioned in a daily report sent via email to subscribers of the Chronicle is the fact that poet JORIE GRAHAM of the University of Iowa Writers' Workshop is listed among Talk magazine's "50 big mouths we hope will never shut up." The premiere issue of the magazine also lists among the top 50 rappers Chuck D, the Rev. Jesse Jackson, poet Maya Angelou and Catharine MacKinnon, the University of Michigan Law School's lawyer and feminist scholar. The article is not available on-line, but information about the magazine may be found on its World-Wide Web site at
http://www.talkmagazine.com

REUTERS, Aug. 5 -- Regular doses of worms might help cure people of inflammatory bowel disease by combating the absence of intestinal parasites in our sterile world, JOEL WEINSTOCK of the University of Iowa told New Scientist magazine Wednesday. Weinstock and his colleagues fed six inflammatory bowel disease sufferers a drink containing microscopic eggs of a species of intestinal worm that does not normally affect people. The results were so dramatic that he is planning a larger trial later this year.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/headlines/sc/story.html?s=v/nm/19990805/sc/health_worms_2.html
The same wire story appeared Aug. 5 on the BOSTON GLOBE web site at:
http://www.boston.com/dailyglobe2/217/nation/A_little_intestinal_fortitude+.shtml
Another version of the story appeared Aug. 5 on THE TIMES OF LONDON web site at:
http://www.the-times.co.uk/news/pages/tim/99/08/05/timnwsnws01020.html?999
Another version of the story appeared Aug. 4 on the BBC NEWS web site at:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/health/newsid_412000/412142.stm
The Reuters version of the story appeared Aug. 4 on the FOX NEWS web site.

USA TODAY, Aug. 5 -- Some residents who live near a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA incinerator that is used to burn animal carcasses after medical research fear it gives off radiation and want it shut down. Many of the carcasses, which were used for cardiovascular research, were exposed to radiation. Officials said the incinerator is safe.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/states/iamain.htm

THE TIMES OF LONDON, Aug. 5 -- Richard Olney, who attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA at his father's insistence and was one of the first food writers to introduce the simple joys of French country cooking to American readers, was found dead Tuesday at his home at Sollies-Toucas in Provence. He was 71.
http://www.the-times.co.uk/news/pages/tim/99/08/05/timobiobi02003.html?999
A NEW YORK TIMES version of the story was reprinted Aug. 4 on the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE web site at:
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/1999/08/04/MN 86829.DTL

REUTERS HEALTH, Aug. 4 -- E-cadherin, a protein important to the integrity of certain cells, may suppress the spread of prostate cancer cells, according to results of studies in rats co-authored by MARY HENDRIX of the University of Iowa. "The results of this study provide a potential new therapeutic strategy for targeting invasive prostate cancer,'' said Hendrix. The findings are published in the Aug. 1 issue of the journal Cancer Research.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/headlines/hl/story.html?s=v/nm/19990804/hl/pros7_1.html

HOT COCO.COM, Aug. 4 -- An ASSOCIATED PRESS story about film technology recently donated to the Renssalaer Polytechnic Institute by Dow Chemical Co. mentions that DuPont recently gave the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA part of $64 million in patents for technology. Hot CoCo is the web site of the Contra Costa Times in Walnut Creek, Calif.
http://www.hotcoco.com/news/business/breaking/stories/720856l.htm

The same Associated Press article appeared Aug. 4 on the NEWSDAY, MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE and NEW YORK TIMES web sites.

BOSTON GLOBE, Aug. 4 -- A story about film technology recently donated to the Renssalaer Polytechnic Institute by Dow Chemical Co. mentions that Dupont recently gave the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA part of $64 million in patents for technology.

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, Aug. 4 -- MICHAEL SPANHEIMER, an endocrinologist at the University of Iowa medical school, comments on the recently developed bone-density test, which helps detect risks for osteoporosis when it's still treatable with estrogen supplements, calcium or drugs. "This really is a major advance," he said. "Even with all the medications we have, it's still hard to build bone. But if we can catch people before they've lost bone, we can do a lot to prevent further loss."

NEW YORK TIMES, Aug. 4 -- Richard Olney, who attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and was one of the first food writers to introduce the simple joys of French country cooking to American readers, was found dead Tuesday at Aug his home at Sollies-Toucas in Provence. He was 71.

KANSAS CITY STAR, Aug. 3 -- PEVERILL SQUIRE, a University of Iowa political scientist, says the Iowa straw poll carries a measure of legitimacy because it is regarded as a barometer of a campaign's organizational strength. "What happens at the straw poll is the best guess we have about who can really generate voters," Squire said.
http://www.kcstar.com:80/item/pages/home.pat,local/3773bcf0.803,.html

MEDTRIB.COM, Aug. 3 -- Doctors may be able to use bacterial DNA to turn the human immune system against cancer and other diseases, according to research by ARTHUR KRIEG, professor of internal medicine at the University of Iowa. The research, which was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences journal, found that the DNA affects dendritic cells -- the master control cells in the immune system. Using the bacterial DNA -- called CpG DNA -- on human cells in a laboratory, the researchers at the University of Iowa were able to trigger a response.

BALTIMORE SUN, Aug. 3 -- Rose Hutchcroft, a nurse manager from Cedar Rapids who along with her fiance adopted a Chinese girl, says that when her 16-month-old daughter is older she hopes to expose her to the large Asian community of students and professors at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, about 20 minutes from her home.

BBC NEWS, Aug. 3 -- Doctors may be able to use bacterial DNA to turn the human immune system against cancer and other diseases, according to research by ARTHUR KRIEG, professor of internal medicine at the University of Iowa. The research, which was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences journal, found that the DNA affects dendritic cells -- the master control cells in the immune system. Using the bacterial DNA -- called CpG DNA -- on human cells in a laboratory, the researchers at the University of Iowa were able to trigger a response.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/health/newsid_410000/410362.stm

NEW YORKER, Aug. 2 -- In the issue's list of contributors, the magazine identifies ETHAN CANIN as a professor in the University of Iowa Writers' Workshop. Canin's short story, Vins Fins, appears in this issue.

ST. PETERSBURG (Fla.) TIMES, Aug. 2 -- ROBERT FORSYTHE, a University of Iowa economics professor, co-authored a study using students on mock electronic message boards. The researchers set up an experiment using business students designated as buyers and sellers of investments. As on the message boards, the buyers received information from sellers on computer screens, but couldn't verify the accuracy of the reports. In some cases, sellers, who knew the true value of the investment, could exaggerate or even lie. Buyers only knew when sellers were allowed to lie, not whether they would lie. "We found people are very much taken in by what should be non-credible communication," Forsythe said.
http://www.sptimes.com:80/News/80299/Business/Surfing_the_message_b.shtml

SALT LAKE TRIBUNE, Aug. 2-- CARY COVINGTON, a University of Iowa political science professor, says presidential hopeful Sen. Orrin Hatch shouldn't attempt to wait for George W. Bush to stumble. The chances of that happening are "pretty low," he says. "[Hatch] brings the kind of credentials you'd expect in a presidential candidate, but frankly he hasn't been doing the kind of groundwork you'd expect to do well in Iowa," Convington said. "Republicans are renowned for making their choice quickly, but this year is even more so."

(Tacoma, Wash.) NEWS TRIBUNE, Aug. 2 -- The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's HARDIN META DIRECTORY -- a site that groups medical links by category and removes them when their connection rate drops -- is included in a list of top health sites that ran with an article about how guidelines and libraries are offering cures for Web confusion. "Researchers say a good connection rate shows that the sponsors are maintaining it -- key as information changes rapidly," the article says.

SACRAMENTO (Calif.) BEE, Aug. 2 -- RHAWN DENNISTON, a geology graduate student at the University of Iowa, collected samples during excavation in a Nevada cave where scientists are looking for the remains of meals eaten by prehistoric carnivores. The cave formations, such as stalagmites and stalactites, are much older than any of the animal remains recovered so far, Denniston said in the ASSOCIATED PRESS article. "The results are surprising,'' he said. "The bones in the cave were about 45,000 years old but the stalagmites, on average, appear to be much older -- greater than 350,000 years."

NEW YORK TIMES, Aug. 1 -- The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA was one of 40 campuses visited last year by Dr. Drew Pinsky and his co-host, comedian Adam Carolla, during a roadshow version of their MTV show "Loveline." Pinsky, known as Dr. Drew, fields questions on everything from sexual dysfunction to insomnia.

MIAMI HERALD, Aug. 1 -- OSHA GRAY DAVIDSON, an adjunct associate professor at the University of Iowa and author of The Enchanted Braid: Coming to Terms with Nature on the Coral Reef, is the author of a column about pending funding legislation for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW, Aug. 1 -- A friend of the late writer Andre Dubus from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, while the pair was running laps, suggested that Dubus' essay "A Hemingway Story" -- about Hemingway's story "In Another Country" -- may have been about the futility of cures. The profile on Dubus explores how the author coped with his own subsequent accident, in which he was struck by a car while helping a motorist and restricted to a wheelchair until his death last winter.

BBC NEWS, Aug. 1 -- A new study finds that a protein can prevent the aggressive form of prostate cancer from spreading to other parts of the body, reports a story that quotes three UI doctors who were on the research team. Quoted are Professor MARY HENDRIX, who led the research and published her team's findings in the journal Cancer Research; Professor DAVID LUBAROFF, who took part in the research; and Professor RICHARD WILLIAMS, head of urology at the university,

THE NEW PHYSICIAN, August 1999 -- MARK GRABER, an associate professor of surgery and family medicine at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, conducted a survey that found many surgeons withhold pain medication from patients in emergency situations because of informed consent issues or fear the drugs may affect the accuracy of their diagnoses. The findings appeared in the American Journal of Emergency Medicine.

REAL TIME GRAPHICS, August 1999 -- During the IMAGE Society's annual conference in Paradise Valley, Ariz., a representative from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA commented that keeping people who use simulators well chilled (around 65-68 degrees Fahrenheit) significantly reduced simulator sickness compared to operation in the mid-70s temperature range. The IMAGE Society is mainly for aerospace simulation professionals.

ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY/LIBRARIES, August 1999 -- SHEILA CRETH, the University of Iowa librarian, and LARRY WOODS, director of information technology, are quoted in an article about the university's plan to install an ALEPH 500 system purchased from Ex Libris (USA). The system will run on an IBM RS/6000, S70 system and support 500 concurrent users.

SKIN & ALLERGY NEWS, August 1999 -- JOHN W. ELY of the University of Iowa is quoted in a story about a new treatment proposed for women with vulvar vestibulitis. Ely said in his commentary on the study that he was astounded when he searched the literature to find a treatment for a patient with the condition. "I just couldn't believe the invasive things that are suggested for this," Ely said.

DISCOVER, August 1999 -- INGO TITZE, a physicist at the University of Iowa and director of the National Center for Voice and Speech, says that air rushing out of the lungs creates a wave motion in vocal cords. They slam into one another, only to blow open again, buffeted by the steady airflow from the lungs. "This vibration releases the energy that the human ear and the brain interpret as sound," Titze said.

ORTHOPEDICS TODAY, August 1999 -- STUART L. WEINSTEIN, M.D., Ignacio V. Ponseti Professor of Orthopedic Surgery at the University of Iowa Hospital and Clinics, was awarded the 12th annual Bristol-Myers Squibb/Zimmer Award for Distinguished Achievement in Orthopaedic Research at the American Orthopaedic Association meeting June 5. He was presented with the $50,000 award, along with a silver medallion.

>MCCALL'S, August 1999 -- In an article about the risks of taking natural remedies, TERESA KLEPSER of the University of Iowa College of Pharmacy cites a case in which a pregnant Iowa woman came to her after taking the herb St. John's wort to ease depression. "It's a good thing she did because St. John's wort can cause miscarriage," Klepser said.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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