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UI in the News

April, 1999

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WALL STREET JOURNAL, April 30 -- Catherine Denial, a 27-year-old graduate student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, ignored critics and tuned in to the NBC drama "Providence" and was hooked. "I watch shows that tackle issues important to my own life and dress up my beliefs ... in a better wardrobe with a cuter supporting cast," she says.
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve.cgi?id=SB925358988325185786.djm

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, April 30 -- KENDALL M. THU, an adjunct assistant professor of anthropology at the University of Iowa, argues in an opinion piece that anthropologists should return to the roots of their discipline, namely that they should study systems for producing and distributing food and their impact on political economies.
http://www.chronicle.com/weekly/v45/i34/34a05601.htm

PITTSBURGH POST-GAZETTE, April 30 -- The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA was involved in the design and construction of a robot that will be used to help with the cleanup of the Chernobyl reactor in the Ukraine.

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, April 29 - A list of Guggenheim Fellowship winners includes J. LEIGHTON PIERCE, professor of comparative literature and communication studies, and KATHERINE TACHAU, professor of history.
http://chronicle.com/daily/99/04/99042907n.htm

NEWSDAY, April 29 - A column of news about the theater world reports that another unpublished drama by "America's great playwright, Tennessee Williams," will have its world premiere in November. The Marin Theatre Company, near San Francisco, will produce "Spring Storm," which is set in 1938, the year it was written, and also the year Williams graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://library.newsday.com/getdoc.cgi?id=131403485x0y31978&OIDS=1Q001D000&Form=RL&bp=

LOS ANGELES TIMES, April 29 -- Tennessee Williams completed his play "Spring Storm" in 1938, the year he graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The play will have its world premiere in November at the Marin Theatre Co. in Mill Valley, north of San Francisco.
http://www.latimes.com/search/searchcgi?action=View&VdkVgwKey=%2E%2E%2F%2E%2E%2FCNS%5FDAYS%2F990429%2Ft000038357%2Ehtml&DocOffset=2&DocsFound=2&QueryZip=%22University+of+Iowa%22&Collection=Hunter&ViewTemplate=search3%2Ehts

20/20 (ABC NEWS), April 28 -- In a follow-up story to the Columbine High School shootings, reporter Elizabeth Vargas explored the darker side of sororities. Vargas reports that "Most sorority pledging experiences are positive, like these at the University of Iowa with their pledge songs and skits." Video accompanying the story showed UI SORORITY sisters singing.
http://abcnews.go.com/onair/2020/transcripts/2020_990428_hazing_trans.html

>REUTERS NEWS SERVICE, April 28 - In an article about the diminishing political influence of the Christian Right, UI political science professor ARTHUR MILLER says, ""The Christian Coalition is not what it was. They are not as unified or organized and some of their clergy now think they should be less active than in the past."
http://www2.nando.net:80/noframes/story/0,2107,43158-69602-504243-0,00.html

SACRAMENTO (Calif. ) BEE, April 28 -- The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is one of 300 universities to establish graduate poetry programs since the 1970s. The UI program accepts 5 percent of its 400 applicants, half the acceptance rate of even Harvard Law School, according to the article.

SALON, April 27 -- Esquire magazine has turned up three unpublished Raymond Carver stories, according to Jay Woodruff, a senior editor at Esquire and friend of Carver's widow, Tess Gallagher. Woodruff met Carver only once, in 1986, when the future editor was a student at the IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP. But as a fan of Gallagher's poetry, Woodruff worked with her on several projects after Carver's death in 1988 -- first for the University of Iowa Press and then at DoubleTake magazine, where he served as managing editor.
http://www.salon.com/books/log/1999/04/27/carver/index.html

TALK OF THE NATION, NPR, April 27 -- UI history professor LINDA KERBER was a guest on the National Public Radio program, whose topic was "individualism versus community in contemporary life." Sociologist Alan Wolfe and Daniel Yankelovich of DYG Inc., a public opinion research firm, were also guests on the program, which was hosted by Ray Suarez.

REUTERS HEALTH, April 27 -- RICHARD E. WALTON, professor of endodontics at the UI College of Dentistry, said many dentists routinely prescribe antibiotics for patients after root canal procedures even though there is no evidence that the drugs reduce pain or speed healing in these patients. Walton presented findings of a study at the American Association of Endodontists' 56th Annual Session.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/headlines/hl/story.html?s=v/nm/19990427/hl/ant9_1.html

STATES NEWS SERVICE, April 27 -- A case of meningitis has been reported at the University of Iowa, but health officials stress that there's no real cause for alarm. MARY KHOWASSAH of the Student Health Service says other students that may have come in contact with the infected student have been advised about the warning signs for the illness. The student who has the disease is hospitalized in good condition.
http://news.lycos.com/stories/local/iowa/19990427rtiowa-news-summary.asp

WASHINGTON POST, April 27 -- UNIVERSITY OF IOWA DELTA DELTA DELTA SORORITY member Jennifer Donovan, interviewed by CNN following a campaign rally for sorority sister Elizabeth Hanford Dole, is featured in a small sidebar article called "QuoteUnquote." Says Donovan: "Yes, I think definitely just today I saw, like, a bunch of interest sparked by, you know, people in my house that usually, maybe aren't interested in politics." Dole was a member of the sorority while a student at Duke University.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/politics/early/early.htm

PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, April 27 -- JORIE GRAHAM is the current leader of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop poetry sequence. Graham won the Pulitzer Prize for poetry in 1996. This fact is mentioned in a feature on poetry.

KANSAS CITY STAR, April 26 -- DENNIS C. HARPER, a University of Iowa pediatrics professor and president of the American Academy for Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine, said doctors frequently monitor developmentally delayed children between the ages of 18 months and 30 months for cerebral palsy. "It's a hard call at a very young age," Harper said. "You need to look at growth over time... Children's nervous systems are amazingly plastic." Harper's comments in this Associated Press article were in response to news that two of Carlisle, Iowa, resident Bobbi McCaughey' s 17-month-old septuplets may have CP.

ATLANTA JOURNAL, April 26 -- DENNIS C. HARPER, a University of Iowa pediatrics professor and president of the American Academy for Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine, said doctors frequently monitor developmentally delayed children between the ages of 18 months and 30 months for cerebral palsy. "It's a hard call at a very young age," Harper said. "You need to look at growth over time. ... Children's nervous systems are amazingly plastic." Harper's comments in this Associated Press article were in response to news that two of Carlisle, Iowa, resident Bobbi McCaughey' s 17-month-old septuplets may have CP.

HOUSTON CHRONICLE, April 26 -- DENNIS C. HARPER, a University of Iowa pediatrics professor and president of the American Academy for Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine, said doctors frequently monitor developmentally delayed children between the ages of 18 months and 30 months for cerebral palsy. "It's a hard call at a very young age," Harper said. "You need to look at growth over time. ... Children's nervous systems are amazingly plastic." Harper's comments were in response to news that two of Carlisle, Iowa, resident Bobbi McCaughey' s 17-month-old septuplets may have CP.

TELEGRAM & GAZETTE (Worcester, Mass.), April 26 -- DENNIS C. HARPER, a University of Iowa pediatrics professor and president of the American Academy for Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine, said in this Associated Press article that doctors frequently monitor developmentally delayed children between the ages of 18 months and 30 months for cerebral palsy. "It's a hard call at a very young age," Harper said. "You need to look at growth over time. ... Children's nervous systems are amazingly plastic." Harper's comments were in response to news that two of Carlisle, Iowa, resident Bobbi McCaughey' s 17-month-old septuplets may have CP.

NEW YORK DAILY NEWS, April 26 -- DENNIS C. HARPER, a University of Iowa pediatrics professor and president of the American Academy for Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine, said doctors frequently monitor developmentally delayed children between the ages of 18 months and 30 months for cerebral palsy. "It's a hard call at a very young age," Harper said. "You need to look at growth over time. ... Children's nervous systems are amazingly plastic." Harper's comments were in response to news that two of Carlisle, Iowa, resident Bobbi McCaughey' s 17-month-old septuplets may have CP.
http://www.mostnewyork.com:80/1999-04-26/News_and_Views/Beyond_the_City/a-26928.asp?last6days=1
The same ASSOCIATED PRESS story ran in the April 26 BERGEN DAILY RECORD in New Jersey:
http://www.bergen.com:80/morenews/septs199904265.htm

SALON, April 26 -- A University of Iowa spokesman, WINSTON BARCLAY, took exception to Salon Books' April 13 log, "Multitude of Wins." Salon examined three years' worth of Scribner's "Best of the Fiction Workshops" volumes and tallied up the number of stories representing each program; Iowa came out in the middle. Barclay responded via e-mail, "I couldn't help but be amused by the juxtaposition of briefs" in that day's log, since the following item announced that the winners of the 1999 Pulitzer Prize included Iowa alumni Mark Strand and Michael Cunningham.
http://www.salonmagazine.com:80/books/log/1999/04/26/jackets/index.html

>MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, April 26 -- DENNIS C. HARPER, a University of Iowa pediatrics professor and president of the American Academy for Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine, said doctors frequently monitor developmentally delayed children between the ages of 18 months and 30 months for cerebral palsy. "It's a hard call at a very young age," Harper said. "You need to look at growth over time. ... Children's nervous systems are amazingly plastic." Harper's comments were in response to news that two of Carlisle, Iowa, resident Bobbi McCaughey' s 17-month-old septuplets may have CP.

SEATTLE TIMES, April 26 -- DENNIS C. HARPER, a University of Iowa pediatrics professor and president of the American Academy for Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine, said doctors frequently monitor developmentally delayed children between the ages of 18 months and 30 months for cerebral palsy. "It's a hard call at a very young age," Harper said. "You need to look at growth over time. ... Children's nervous systems are amazingly plastic." Harper's comments were in response to news that two of Carlisle, Iowa, resident Bobbi McCaughey' s 17-month-old septuplets may have CP.

SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, April 26 -- DENNIS C. HARPER, a University of Iowa pediatrics professor and president of the American Academy for Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine, said doctors frequently monitor developmentally delayed children between the ages of 18 months and 30 months for cerebral palsy. "It's a hard call at a very young age," Harper said. "You need to look at growth over time. ... Children's nervous systems are amazingly plastic." Harper's comments were in response to news that two of Carlisle, Iowa, resident Bobbi McCaughey' s 17-month-old septuplets may have CP.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/1999/04/26/ national0352EDT0469.DTL

LOS ANGELES TIMES, April 26 -- Two of the 17-month-old McCaughey septuplets in Carlisle, Iowa, are growing so slowly that there's concern they may have cerebral palsy, their mother said. DENNIS C. HARPER, a University of Iowa pediatrics professor and president of the American Academy for Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine, said doctors frequently monitor developmentally delayed children between 18 months and 30 months for cerebral palsy, reports this Associated Press article.
http://www.latimes.com/CNS_DAYS/990426/t000037468.html

NEWSDAY April 26 -- Two of the 17-month-old McCaughey septuplets in Carlisle, Iowa, are growing so slowly that there's concern they may have cerebral palsy, their mother said. DENNIS C. HARPER, a University of Iowa pediatrics professor and president of the American Academy for Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine, said doctors frequently monitor developmentally delayed children between 18 months and 30 months for cerebral palsy, reports this ASSOCIATED PRESS article.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, April 26 -- Two of the 17-month-old McCaughey septuplets in Carlisle, Iowa, are growing so slowly that there's concern they may have cerebral palsy, their mother said. DENNIS C. HARPER, a University of Iowa pediatrics professor and president of the American Academy for Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine, said doctors frequently monitor developmentally delayed children between 18 months and 30 months for cerebral palsy, reports this ASSOCIATED PRESS article.
http://chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/article/0,1051,SAV-9904260169,00.html

STATES NEWS SERVICE, April 26 -- New Jersey Sen. Bill Bradley, the only Democrat challenging Vice President Al Gore for the party's presidential nomination, made stops at Iowa State University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA campus over the weekend. He told dozens of students at both schools that it's "critical'' for the future of the country for them to get involved in the political process.
http://news.lycos.com/stories/local/iowa/19990426rtiowa-news-summary.asp

PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, April 25 -- Two-term Poet Laureate and Pulitzer Prize-winner Rita Dove was educated at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, and at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Although she also studied in Germany on a Fulbright in 1974, it was at Iowa that she met Fred Viebahn, a German who would become her husband. She was given the job of translating a lecture that he gave from German into English.
http://www.phillynews.com/inquirer/99/Apr/25/books/BAUTH25.htm

LOS ANGELES TIMES, April 25 -- In response to the question,"Is there L.A. Literature?" D.J. Waldie, author of "Holy Land: A Suburban Memoir," says: "The standard for the excellence of its stories won't have been set in the IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP but by women talking at a hearth baking chipati and men whispering in Spanish before slipping between strands of barbed wire across any border south of here."
http://www.calendarlive.com/HOME/CALENDARLIVE/BOOKS/BOOKREVIEW/t000000039.html
A summary of the same story ran in the April 28 issue of the CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION:
http://www.chronicle.com/daily/magmain.htm

BOSTON GLOBE, April 25 -- New Hampshire is suffering a "brain drain" of new teachers who are increasingly moving to Massachusetts for new jobs. One such person, Mike Michaud -- who did his internship for the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in cooperation with the University of New Hampshire -- was offered $7,200 in loan payback over four years if he would teach in Boston.
http://www.boston.com/dailyglobe2/115/newhampshire/Researchers_say_school_terror_leaves_anxiety+.shtml

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, April 25 -- Four Iowa colleges have won national wrestling titles, 17 by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The story focuses on Iowa’s wrestling history.

THE NEWS TRIBUNE (Tacoma, Wash.), April 24 -- The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is one of 300 universities to establish graduate poetry programs since the 1970s. The UI program accepts 5 percent of its 400 applicants, half the acceptance rate of even Harvard Law School, according to the article.

WASHINGTON POST, April 24 -- The Maia String Quartet, quartet-in-residence at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, performed Anton Webern's Six Bagatelles, Op. 9, twice the previous Thursday at a German Embassy concern honoring the Czech Republic's entrance into NATO. The quartet, formed in 1990, consists of violinists Amy Kuhlmann Appold and Timothy Shiu, violist Elizabeth Oakes and cellist Amos Yang.

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, April 23 -- LINDA K. KERBER, a professor of history at the University of Iowa and author of the book "No Constitutional Right to Be Ladies: Women and the Obligations of Citizenship," wrote an article on moving beyond the stereotypes of feminism.
http://www.chronicle.com/weekly/v45/i33/33b00601.htm

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, April 23 -- MICHAEL P. D'ALESSANDRO, an assistant professor of radiology and director of the University of Iowa's Virtual Hospital project, says its Web site provides medical students with an authoritative source of information. It also provides patients with some of the same information that is available to health-care professionals.
http://www.chronicle.com/weekly/v45/i33/33a04101.htm

STATES NEWS SERVICE, April 23 -- The Iowa Board of Regents has given final approval to an increase in room and board rates at the three state universities in the upcoming school year. The cost at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA will rise 5 percent.

STATES NEWS SERVICE, April 23 -- The University of Iowa has received permission from the Board of Regents to open a college of public health. The college will train nurses, doctors, and other health care professionals. JAMES MERCHANT, current director for the Department of Preventive Medicine and Environmental Health, will be the dean of the new college.

WASHINGTON POST, April 22 -- An overflow crowd of students at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA waited patiently Thursday for potential presidential candidate Elizabeth Dole to appear for an afternoon town meeting -- and the chance to pose some questions to the candidate. Instead they got a one-way phone message and a promise that she would come back to see them later this year. Dole was stuck in Chicago airports most of the day because of rain.

ABCNEWS.COM, April 21 -- HAROLD ADAMS, M.D., director of the acute stroke care unit at the University of Iowa and lead author on a study of a blood thinner called danaparoid, said the drug failed to improve stroke recovery in the long-term.

EDUCATION WEEK, April 21 -- UI will host the first Wallace Family National Conference on Gifted Education in Rural Schools. This was an advance story on the conference.

LOS ANGELES TIMES, April 21 -- The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is one of 300 universities to establish graduate poetry programs since the 1970s. The UI program accepts 5 percent of its 400 applicants, half the acceptance rate of even Harvard Law School, according to the article.

NEW YORK TIMES, April 20 -- Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Michael Cunningham published stories in The Atlantic Monthly and other magazines after being accepted by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S WRITERS' WORKSHOP. Then, says this profile on Cunningham, he "found himself drifting back into his old bad habits, tending bar and not finishing novels."
http://www.nytimes.com/library/books/042099cunningham-interview.html

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR, April 20 -- RANDALL BEZANSON, a law professor at the University of Iowa, said reporters who rely on the Internet for tips during the upcoming presidential campaign might be in for one goose chase after another. "The problem is that this places hydraulic pressure on the editorial process, to speed up the filtering, because you don't want to be old news," Bezanson said.
http://www.csmonitor.com/durable/1999/04/20/fp1s3-csm.shtml

SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, April 20 -- ANTONIO DAMASIO, professor of neurology at the University of Iowa and an expert on the neuroscience of emotion, discussed a study of three patients who had damage to a part of the brain thought to regulate fear. Because of the damage, these people see all human faces as happy faces and judge the people behind them as honest and trustworthy, no matter what expression they exhibit.
http://www7.mercurycenter.com:80/premium/scitech/docs/sciscene20.htm

LOS ANGELES TIMES, April 19 -- Many physicians withhold pain medication from patients in emergency situations because they mistakenly believe the drugs may affect the accuracy of their diagnoses, according to researchers from the University of Iowa. In fact, diagnoses are more accurate if the patients are suitably medicated, MARK A. GRABER reported in the March AMERICAN JOURNAL OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE.

CHICAGO SUN-TIMES, April 18 -- A story about a study that found many of today's teens lonely and ambitious suggests that parents and counselors help students reach their goals by guiding them toward internships in careers that interest them. One 17-year-old student quoted said his "high passion for spacecraft" has led him to consider becoming an aerospace engineer, and he wants to attend the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, April 18 -- ROBERT BAIRD, director of the University of Iowa’s School of Religion, says in a story about world-religion classes’ popularity that Iowa was the first public university in the country to establish a full religion program.

WORLD (Asheville, N.C.), April 17 -- Teaching assistants at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA are negotiating to join the United Electrical Workers union.

WALL STREET JOURNAL, April 16 - Even though value funds haven't been performing well of late, UI finance professor TIM LOUGHRAN's data show that over time, small-cap value stocks delivered almost twice the annual return of small-cap growth stocks.
http://interactive.wsj.com/articles/SB924221450808464104.htm

CHICAGO SUN-TIMES, April 15 -- The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is one of four universities that accepted a student profiled in a feature story. The student, Laura Shamorian, a senior at Warren Township High School in Gurnee, Ill., is interested in communications and broadcast journalism.

>LOS ANGELES TIMES, April 15 -- ED HAUG, a UI engineering professor and founding director of the National Advanced Driving Simulator, says every driving condition can be simulated with the exception of rain on the windshield. Among other things, the $56 million driving simulator will be used to study the impact of mobile offices -- cars equipped with computers that can send faxes and log on to the Internet -- on driving safety.

HEARING HEALTH, April 15 -- RICHARD S. TYLER, director of audiology at the University of Iowa, is quoted in a story about tinnitus. Tyler and his colleagues at the UI sponsor an annual forum for some of today’s great thinkers on tinnitus treatment.

THE SAN DIEGO UNION-TRIBUNE, April 14 -- JENNIFER NIEBYL, head of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, challenges the notion that morning sickness serves an evolutionary benefit by protecting the fetus from potential toxins in certain foods.

STATES NEWS SERVICE, April 14 -- Two controversial medical waste incinerators at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA will soon be shutting down. There are now much tougher federal clean air guidelines, and the university decided it would be less expensive to close down the incinerators than to try to modify them to meet the standards.

NEWSDAY, April 14 - Damage to a tiny nut-shaped area of the brain called the amygdala, which is thought to regulate fear, can leave people unable to judge complex negative emotions as indicated by facial expressions, ANTONIO DAMASIO, a UI professor and head of neurology, said at a meeting sponsored by the Society for Neuroscience.

SALON, April 13 - The online magazine carries a short item noting that despite the IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP fame, writers from the University of Michigan workshop have had more works published in Scribner's "Best of the Fiction Workshops" series.
http://www.salonmagazine.com/books/log/1999/04/13/wins/index.html

CHICAGO SUN TIMES, April 13 -- Mark Strand, who received a master's degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for poetry this week. Strand is currently at the University of Chicago.

REUTERS HEALTH, April 13 -- Significant changes in maternal blood pressure during cesarean section are normal and do not indicate real danger to the mother or her newborn, according to study lead author FRANKLIN DEXTER of the University of Iowa. "Very large changes in blood pressure occur in the operating room yet women and their babies do well, said Dexter, who with colleagues at Duke University published their findings in the April issue of the Journal of Clinical Monitoring and Computing.

LINCOLN (Neb.) JOURNAL STAR, April 13 -- A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study found unbelted passengers spend an average of 17 days in the hospital after a crash, compared to seven for belted passengers. The findings were mentioned in an article about Nebraska's efforts to strengthen its seat belt laws.
http://www.journalstar.com:80/archives/041399/neb/sto5

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, April 12 -- Michael Cunningham, who received a master's degree from the University of Iowa's prestigious WRITERS' WORKSHOP and who now teaches creative writing at Columbia University, won the Pulitzer for fiction for his novel "The Hours." The book was inspired partly by Virginia Woolf and her modernist classic "Mrs. Dalloway," according to this Associated Press article. The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran in the WASHINGTON POST April 12 and in the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE April 12:
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/1999/04/13/ national0344EDT0488.DTL

NEW YORK TIMES, April 12 -- "The Hours," UI WRITERS' WORKSHOP graduate Michael Cunningham's Pulitzer winning novel, is about "the haunting of present lives by memories and books, by distant pasts and missed futures, by novels and poems to be read and written."
http://www.nytimes.com/library/arts/041299pulitzer-prizes.html#fiction

REUTERS, April 11 -- HAROLD ADAMS, director of cardiovascular diseases at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics and a principal investigator in the second-phase study of a new anti-clotting drug, says preliminary data is promising, "considering that stroke patients currently have limited treatment options." The drug is produced by Centocor Inc.

LOS ANGELES TIMES, April 11 -- JUDY POLUMBAUM, a University of Iowa professor who is studying the Chinese sports system, says that a Chinese professor's efforts to bring NCAA-style athletics to his country -- specifically basketball -- represents "a first crack at creating a setup in which young people can exercise athletic talents without being deprived of a real education."

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, April 11 -- BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, professor of leisure studies at the University of Iowa, is quoted extensively in an article that examines the prospects for America adopting a shorter work week. Hunnicutt, a co-organizer of a 1996 conference on shorter work hours held in Iowa City, says the idea that people ought to work less has a long and honorable history.

SUN-SENTINEL (Fort Lauderdale, Fla.), April 10 -- ANTONIO DAMASIO, M.D., of the University of Iowa has found that people with damage to the connection between their limbic structures and the higher brain are smart and rational -- but unable to make decisions. His work is mentioned in a story about the science of flirting.

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, April 9 -- University of Iowa professors MARIA T. PAO and RICHARD D. DE PUMA will share in the more than $17.30 million in grants and stipends awarded by the National Endowment for the Humanities. Pao, a visiting assistant professor in Spanish and Portuguese, was awarded a $4,000 stipend for her research on "The Surrealist Prose Poem in Avant-Garde Spain Before the Civil War." De Puma, professor of art and art history, was awarded a $4,000 stipend for his research on "Etruscan Forgeries: Archaeological Deception in Italy, ca.1850-1950."
http://www.chronicle.com/daily/99/04/99040999n.htm

CNN INTERACTIVE, April 8 -- "The Hours," a novel by IOWA WRITERS’ WORKSHOP graduate Michael Cunningham, won the $15,000 PEN/Faulkner Award, the largest prize awarded for fiction by a jury in the United States.
http://cnn.com/books/news/9904/08/pen.faulkner/index.html

TONIGHT WITH JAY LENO, APRIL 8 -- Jay Leno, host of the "Tonight" show on NBC, commented on the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA 's search for subjects to complete an ongoing medical study on chronic marijuana use, brain function and cognition.

STATES NEWS SERVICE, April 8 -- The Delta Tau Delta Fraternity has revoked the charter of its Omicron chapter at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Spokesman Garth Eberheart says the chapter continually violated university policy of drug and alcohol abuse, and there was no choice but to shut it down.

>THE (Oklahoma City) JOURNAL RECORD, April 7 -- DAVID FORKENBROCK, director of the Public Policy Center at the University of Iowa, said the planned realignment of an interstate through downtown Oklahoma City is a rare event. "We’ve had a hard time finding a good example to use to document what could happen to Oklahoma City," he said.

DALLAS MORNING NEWS, April 7 -- DEANNA HURST, head of career placement for liberal arts and business students at the University of Iowa, is quoted in an article about the proliferation of job postings on the Web. "Our students are finding employment links while they're shopping at L.L. Bean," Hurst said.

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, April 7 -- University of Iowa researchers led by JOHN W. ELY, associate professor of family medicine, found that family doctors with the most impressive credentials are most likely to be sued. The study examined the malpractice records of family doctors who practiced in Florida for a year or more from 1971 to 1994.

BUSINESS WEEK, April 5 -- The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION is listed among Business Week’s second-tier of top business schools in the country. The article accompanying the list of the 25 runners-up discusses the merits of programs that didn’t make the magazine’s list of best business schools.

INTER@CTIVE, April 5 -- The judge overseeing the Microsoft antitrust trial has given both sides a new timetable. "He's trying to get them to settle," said HERB HOVENKAMP, an antitrust specialist and law professor at the University of Iowa. By telegraphing his intentions through findings of fact, Hovenkamp said, the judge will give both sides fair warning of what's to come if they don't work things out themselves.

PCWEEK, April 5 -- Antitrust expert and University of Iowa law professor HERB HOVENKAMP, commenting on the Microsoft antitrust trial, said that "The general rule of settlement is, the more certain the parties are about what the outcome will be, the more likely a settlement will be."

SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, April 5 -- GERALD GEBHART, a pharmacologist researching new pain drugs at the University of Iowa, is quoted in the first story in a two-part series on people who suffer from chronic pain. "Pain patients require a lot of talking and a lot of listening," Gebhart said. That takes patience and sensitivity that not all doctors can, or care to, muster: finding the right treatments can take months or years of experimentation.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/1999/04/05
/MN37A1P.DTL

NEW YORK TIMES, April 4 -- A story on the National Academic Quiz Tournament mentions that the Midwest regional is held at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The regional competition was held at the UI in February.
http://search.nytimes.com/search/daily/bin/fastweb?getdoc+site+site+24958+2+wAAA+%22University%7Eof%7EIowa%22

THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS, April 4 -- A Whitman Chronology written by Joann P. Krieg and published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS is briefly reviewed. The same article ran in the April 4 issue of the HOUSTON CHRONICLE.

HOUSTON CHRONICLE, April 4 -- A Whitman Chronology written by Joann P. Krieg and published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS is briefly reviewed. The same article ran in the April 4 issue of THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS.

SAN FRANCISCO EXAMINER, April 4 -- A Whitman Chronology written by Joann P. Krieg and published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS is briefly reviewed.

THE TENNESSEAN, April 4 -- BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, a University of Iowa professor who studies work and leisure, said compressed work weeks aren’t new. The idea was briefly popular in the early 1970s.

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, April 3 -- A Minnesota bookbinding business employs Tim Clark, who had previously worked in engineering in an aerospace project at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S PHYSICS department. Clark now pares leather on an old lithography stone. "It's a lot more relaxed than aerospace," he said.

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, April 2 -- Robert L. Root Jr., a professor of English at Central Michigan University, is author of a forthcoming study of essays of E.B. White titled "E.B. White: The Emergence of an Essayist" (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS). Root is quoted in an article about another professor's identification of essays that live on in American culture.
http://www.chronicle.com/weekly/v45/i30/30a02001.htm (password may be required)

REUTERS HEALTH, April 2 -- Despite technological improvements designed to lessen their workload, Americans work more at the century's end than its beginning, in part because they have developed a religious-like attachment to work, according to BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT of the University of Iowa. Hunnicutt presented his views in mid-March at a conference sponsored by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and the American Psychological Association, in Baltimore, Md.

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, April 2 -- Laura Watson Dalton and Maria Therese Lehner didn't know each other, but they apparently had a lot in common. Friends say the women, whose bodies were found March 19 in the apartment of three UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students, both were outgoing, caring and nice to be around. The UI students, who were gone when the bodies were discovered, are not under suspicion in the case. The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article appeared April 2 in the LOS ANGELES TIMES; April 2 in the NEW YORK TIMES; April 2 in the WASHINGTON POST and April 2 in the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE:
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/1999/04/02/national 0559EST0494.DTL

REUTERS HEALTH, April 1 -- Using brain scans, DEBRA JOHNSON and colleagues from the University of Iowa found that introverts show more blood flow and activity in the frontal lobes and anterior thalamus, which are areas believed to be responsible for remembering, problem solving, and planning. Extroverts exhibit more activity in the anterior cingulate gyrus, temporal lobes and posterior thalamus -- areas of the brain thought to be more involved in sensory processing such as listening, watching, or driving. Their findings were reported in the AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY.

>MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, April 1 -- The family of Maria Therese Lehner buried her Wednesday with the things she held dear before her violent death in Iowa: fishing gear and a stuffed schnauzer dog. The bodies of Lehner and another woman were found March 19 in the apartment of three UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students.

MSNBC, April 1 -- The judge overseeing the Microsoft antitrust trial has given both sides a new timetable. "He's trying to get them to settle," said HERB HOVENKAMP, an antitrust specialist and law professor at the University of Iowa. By telegraphing his intentions through findings of fact, Hovenkamp said, the judge will give both sides fair warning of what's to come if they don't work things out themselves.
http://www.msnbc.com:80/news/255448.asp

ARBOR AGE, April 1999 -- Because of the environmentally conscious community in Iowa City, home of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, the Army Corps of Engineers wanted to create a Christmas tree recycling program, which has been a big success.

>ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY/LIBRARIES, April 1999 -- SHEILA CRETH will resign as University of Iowa librarian in December. She plans to establish a consulting business in organization development and human resources.

SKY & TELESCOPE, April 1999 -- LOU FRANK and JOHN SIGWARTH of the University of Iowa reanalyzed images of atmospheric "holes" in an effort to give further weight to their theory that thousands of 40-ton minicomets bombard Earth daily. The astronomy magazine reports that the pair's findings appeared in the Jan. 1 issue of JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH.
http://www.skypub.com/news/special/cosmicrain.html

>EXCEPTIONAL PARENT, April 1999 -- The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA’S VIRTUAL HOSPITAL is listed as a resource at the end of a letter to the editor in which two parents are looking for specific information about a possible connection between caudal regression syndrome and diabetes.

>CHOICE (Middleton, Conn.), April 1999 -- A.F. ROBERTS of the University of Iowa reviews the book "Beads and bead makers: gender, material culture and meaning, a collection of essays edited by Lidia D.Sciama and Joanne B. Eicher and distributed by New York University.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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