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UI in the News

September, 1998

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CHARLOTTE (N.C.) OBSERVER, Sept. 29 - A story on research into the use of poplar trees to clean groundwater mentioned a study conducted by UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers and published in the October issue of the Journal of Environmental Engineering. The ASSOCIATED PRESS story also appeared in the (Madison) WISCONSIN STATE JOURNAL and on CNN INTERACTIVE, ABC.COM and MSNBC's website.
CNN: http://cnn.com/TECH/science/9809/28/super.trees.ap/index.html

RICHMOND (Va.) TIMES-DISPATCH, Sept. 29 - A story about cleaning up polluted industrial sites by planting poplar trees notes that research conducted by scientists at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Missouri-Rolla reports that conventional poplar trees effectively reduce high soil levels of atrazine, a farm fertilizer.

NEW YORK TIMES, Sept. 29 - Dr. ARTHUR KRIEG, professor of internal medicine, was quoted in a story on the development of "antisense" drugs, a field of biotechnology that uses specially created sections of DNA to block the action of certain disease-causing genes.

BERGEN (N.J.) RECORD, Sept. 29 - An ASSOCIATED PRESS story on research into the use of poplar trees to clean groundwater mentioned a study conducted by UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers and published in the October issue of the Journal of Environmental Engineering. The story also appeared on the website of the ENVIRONMENTAL NEWS NETWORK.
http://www.bergen.com:80/morenews/poplar199809295.htm

NEW YORK POST, Sept. 28- Research by LESLIE MARGOLIN, associate professor in the Division of Counseling, Rehabilitation and Student Development, on correlations between child abuse and family structures that include live-in "boyfriends" was the focus for an editorial. The editorial, "The Social-Science Subject that Nobody Wants To Touch," argued that policymakers are afraid to follow up on research that indicates unmarried boyfriends are several more times likely to abuse the children of their girlfriends than are other adults the child may come into contact with.

PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, Sept. 28 - A profile of novelist ETHAN CANIN, who holds a medical degree from Harvard University, noted that he studied fiction writing at the UI WRITERS' WORKSHOP before going to medical school and that he has recently joined the Workshop faculty.
http://www.phillynews.com/inquirer/98/Sep/28/entertainment/CANI28.htm

CHARLOTTE (N.C.) OBSERVER, Sept. 28 - BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, UI professor of sport, health, leisure, and physical studies, was quoted in a column on a growing trend toward "compressed workweeks" for American workers. The idea of working four, 10-hour days gained currency briefly in the 1970s as a business-backed alternative to calls for a 32-hour workweek, Hunnicutt said. He said he opposes the schedule because it "simply bunches the time so it's nothing but work or nothing but leisure." The story originally appeared in the DALLAS MORNING NEWS.
http://www.charlotte.com/jobhunter/jobnews/pub/059364.htm

WASHINGTON POST, Sept. 28 - Robert J. Perkins, the new head of a for-profit communications company that oversees the flagship publication of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce holds a bachelor's degree in business administration from the UI, a profile noted.

(Minneapolis) STAR-TRIBUNE, Sept. 27 - An exhibition of photographs at the UI MUSEUM OF ART was included in a story on art exhibitions with Minnesota connections. The Museum is exhibiting photographs by Minneapolis photographer Stuart Klipper through Oct. 25.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Sept. 24 - Standards for promotion from one grade to the next have been raised for many Chicago public school students, but continues to be based on their performance on the IOWA TESTS OF BASIC SKILLS, according to a story. The Chicago system was the focus of national attention last year when officials ended "social promotion" and based advancement on performance on the Iowa tests. Under the new standards, 8th graders must score at the 7.4 grade level in reading and math, an increase over last year's 7.2 promotion standards.
http://chicagotribune.com/splash/article/0,1051,SAV-9809240239,00.html

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Sept. 25 - The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA was included in a roundup on the status of "virtual universities" across the country. The UI was included in the description of the "Common Market of Courses and Institutes" offered through the Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC). The list also noted that a draft strategic plan for a statewide system was presented to the state Board of Regents (1996).

INTERNATIONAL SECURITIES REGULATION REPORT, Sept. 24 - An article about the Malaysian government implementing currency controls quotes both BILL ALBRECHT, UI professor of finance, and ENRIQUE CARRASCO, UI professor of law. Albrecht says the Securities Commission "has a very difficult task in front of itto prop up the market, not make it open, honest, etc." Carrasco says "even the short-term imposition of controls has led to a lack of predictability and a penchant for corruption controls affect bureaucratic agencies because they're based on the ruling government's economic policies."

NEW YORK TIMES, Sept. 23 - TOM ROCKLIN, director of the UI Center for Teaching and professor in the UI College of Education, was quoted in a story on the use of new technology by students who cheat. The story was prompted by an increase in reports of cheating at Virginia Tech. Rocklin said instructors can reduce the incentive for cheating by giving very specific assignments and requiring outlines and early drafts. "If you tie assignments really tightly to what you're doing in class, it becomes more difficult to cheat," Rocklin said. A version of the story originally appeared in the ROANOKE (Va.) TIMES.

LEXINGTON (Ky.) HERALD-LEADER, Sept. 23 - BONNIE SLATTON, chair of sport, health, leisure and physical studies at the UI, was quoted in a story on the NCAA's decision to ban the University of Louisville's men's basketball team from post-season play. Slatton, the acting chairwoman of the NCAA infractions committee, said repeated offenses at Louisville resulted in a harsh sanction: "Anytime you have a repeat violation case, especially if it involves the same program with the same head coach, you are in a problem area," said Slatton.
http://www.kentuckyconnect.com/heraldleader/news/092398/n4crum.shtml

PITTSBURGH POST-GAZETTE, Sept. 23 - Dr. HAROLD P. ADAMS, professor of neurology, was quoted in a story reporting the use of the imaging technique positron emission tomography, or PET, scanning to determine the risk for stroke faced by people who have low blood flow. Adams wrote an editorial to accompany the study, which was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. A similar story was carried by the REUTERS news service and by MSNBC.
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette story:
http://www.post-gazette.com:80/healthscience/19980923stroke1.asp
MSNBC story:
http://www.msnbc.com/news/198758.asp

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Sept. 23 - A roundup of news from the Big 10 noted that Iowa football coach HAYDEN FRY "shrugged off suggestions" in the Tribune that he retire at the end of the year.

USA TODAY, Sept. 22 - In the "Across the USA: News From Every State" roundup, the Iowa item noted that Gov. Terry Branstad thinks a proposed 5.2 percent tuition increase at the three public universities is "out of line." Increases should be closer to the 3 percent rate of inflation, Branstad said.

DALLAS MORNING NEWS, Sept. 22 - A study co-authored by JENNIFER GLASS, professor of sociology, on the likelihood that new mothers will return to their jobs was reported in a roundup. Glass and a co-author studied more than 300 pregnant women and found that more than 70 percent of new mothers returned to their old jobs, but their willingness to stay depended on the length of maternity leaves offered by employers and whether the new mothers could avoid working excessive hours.

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH, Sept. 21 - PETER BLANCK, professor of law, was quoted and his research featured in a REUTERS NEWS SERVICE column on issues in the workplace.

NETWORK WORLD, Sept. 21 - HERBERT HOVENKAMP, professor of law, was quoted in a brief item on the email record of Microsoft Corp.'s business practices and allegations that Microsoft officials destroyed some of those documents.

U.S. NEWS & WORLD REPORT, Sept. 21 - KENNETH MERRELL, associate professor of school psychology in the Division of Psychological and Quantitative Foundations of the College of Education, was quoted in a sidebar on advice for parents when talking to children about the Clinton scandal.
http://www.usnews.com:80/usnews/issue/980921/21kids.htm

PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, Sept. 20 - PHILLIP JONES, vice president for student services and dean of students, was quoted on the endurance of the campus myth that says the roommate of a student who dies automatically gets all A's. The myth was revived in the recent movie, "Dead Man on Campus." Jones said the issue came up after the alcohol-related death of fraternity pledge Matthew Garofalo: "The student government office got numerous calls about the policy on this. It got to be a discussion of who would get all A's, his roommate in the dorm where he lived or the other people in the fraternity."
http://www.phillynews.com:80/inquirer/98/Sep/20/front_page/MYTH20.htm

SEATTLE TIMES, Sept. 20 - HERBERT HOVENKAMP, professor of law, was quoted in a story on the U.S. Department of Justice's antitrust investigation of Microsoft Corp. Investigators are curious about meetings between Microsoft and Apple Computers over "media players." "The problem with this stuff for Microsoft is the cumulative nature," Hovenkamp said.
http://www.seattletimes.com/news/business/html98/micr_092098.html

WASHINGTON POST, Sept. 20 - Donald Justice, a graduate of the UI and former faculty member in the UI WRITERS' WORKSHOP, was the featured poet in Robert Hass' "Poet's Choice" column.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/WPlate/1998-09/20/273l-092098-idx.html

WASHINGTON POST, Sept. 20 - A long feature profiled the struggles of Chris Hatcher, two-time all-Big Ten and all-American baseball player at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, to reach the major leagues.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/style/daily/hatcher092098.htm

NEW YORK TIMES, Sept. 20 - An obituary for Annabelle Irwin, the author of several well-known novels for teen-agers, noted that she received a master's degree from the UI.

WICHITA (KAN.) EAGLE, Sept. 18 - Donald Beggs, who holds a doctorate in educational measurement and statistics from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is one of four finalists for the presidency of Wichita State University, according to a story. Beggs most recently was chancellor at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale.
http://www.wichitaeagle.com/news/local/learning/wsupres-finalists0918.htm

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION's Academe Today, Sept. 18 - WILLIAM F. DECKER, director and associate vice president for information technology services, was quoted in a story on plans for the National Science Foundation's high-speed computer network, known as the very-high-performance backbone network service, or vBNS. Decker, on leave from the UI at the NSF, is program director for advanced network infrastructure at the NSF.

USA TODAY, Sept. 18 - In the "Across the USA: News From Every State" roundup, the item for Iowa reported that Iowa City residents are complaining that UNIVERSITY OF IOWA fraternities have moved their parties off-campus because houses in the Greek system are alcohol-free.

WASHINGTON POST, Sept. 18 - A brief item announcing a concert by Kevin Gordon noted that he attended the UI WRITERS WORKSHOP as a poet.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/WPlate/1998-09/18/036l-091898-idx.html

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Sept. 18 - A profile of the poet Charles Wright included many references to his time as a student at the UI WRITERS' WORKSHOP.

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Sept. 18 - The work of LINDA KERBER, professor of history, was profiled in a long feature. Kerber's new book, "No Constitutional Right to Be Ladies," is the latest in a career focusing on the role of women in American history. "Today, other historians talk about how important Ms. Kerber is to her discipline," the story noted.

LOS ANGELES TIMES, Sept. 18 - HERBERT HOVENKAMP, professor of law, was quoted in a story on a federal judge's ruling that allows the U.S. Department of Justice to pursue allegations that Microsoft Corp. engaged in a broad range of monopolistic practices in its dealings with other computer companies.

(New Orleans) TIMES-PICAYUNE, Sept. 17 - GILBERT CRANBERG, professor of journalism, was quoted in an ASSOCIATED PRESS story on the grocery chain Food Lion's offering a case study on its battle with ABC News to 200 journalism schools around the country. The story also appeared in the (Charleston, S.C.) POST AND COURIER.

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH, Sept. 17 - A story on a Peoria woman who was able to breast feed her newborn after surviving breast cancer noted that the woman received fertility treatments at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The story originally appeared in the PEORIA (Ill.) JOURNAL-STAR.

WALL STREET JOURNAL, Sept. 17 - Baxter International Inc.'s Healthcare Corp. is dropping its development of a blood substitute that replaces human hemoglobin to focus on developing genetically engineered hemoglobin molecules, a story noted. The blood-substitute product, known as HEMASSIST, was invented at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA (uncredited in the story.) DOW JONES NEWSWIRES ran a similar story.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Sept. 17 - A story on efforts by Service Employees International Union to unionize employees at a suburban Harvey, Ill. hospital listed a new bargaining unit of 1,900 employees at UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS as one of the union's recent successes.
http://chicagotribune.com/splash/article/0,1051,SAV-9809170397,00.html

USA TODAY, Sept. 17 - A review of Peter Craig's new novel, "The Martini Shot," noted Craig is a graduate of the UI WRITERS' WORKSHOP.
http://www.usatoday.com/life/enter/books/b703.htm

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Sept. 17 - Baxter International's decision to drop development of the blood substitute known as HemAssist is "bad news for the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA," a story noted, because the product was invented at the UI. "We are disappointed and sad,'' said Bruce Wheaton, executive director of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA RESEARCH FOUNDATION. "It was a royalty bearing deal. We were going to get 4 percent of net sales."
http://chicagotribune.com/business/businessnews/article/0,1051,ART-14883,00.html

WALL STREET JOURNAL, Sept. 17 - "For Kings and Planets," by ETHAN CANIN, faculty member in the UI WRITERS' WORKSHOP, was reviewed.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Sept. 16 - Sports columnist Andrew Bagnato published an open letter to Iowa football coach HAYDEN FRY, urging him to resign at the end of this season.
http://chicagotribune.com/splash/article/0,1051,SAV-9809160058,00.html

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Sept. 16 - The winner of the first prize in this year's Nelson Algren Awards for Short Fiction is Maura Stanton, a professor at Indiana University and a graduate of the UI WRITERS' WORKSHOP, a story noted.
http://chicagotribune.com/splash/article/0,1051,SAV-9809160305,00.html

ASSOCIATED PRESS, Sept. 16 - GILBERT CRANBERG, professor of journalism, was quoted in a story on the grocery chain Food Lion's offering a case study on its battle with ABC News to 200 journalism schools around the country. "You treat anything skeptically that came from one side in litigation," Cranberg said. "You realize they have an ax to grind. You'd have to wonder what they omitted and what kind of spin they're putting on it." The story appeared in several papers, including the AKRON (Ohio) BEACON-JOURNAL, and the RALEIGH-DURHAM (N.C.) NEWS AND OBSERVER.

USA TODAY, Sept. 16 - In the "Across the USA: News From Every State" roundup, the item for Iowa noted that an 8-year-old boy who mistakenly received the wrong chemotherapy treatment at UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS is recovering from a lung biopsy.

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION's Academe Today, Sept. 16 - The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has been awarded $1.6 million as one of 58 universities to receive grants from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute to improve science education. The four-year grants are intended to improve undergraduate education programs in the biological sciences "by expanding research opportunities, improving outreach, updating technologies and science curricula, and recruiting faculty members." (GEORGE CAIN, professor of biological sciences, is the principal investigator for the UI grant.)

SEATTLE TIMES, Sept. 15 - HERBERT HOVENKAMP, professor of law, was quoted in a story analyzing the Sept. 14 ruling that the U.S. Department of Justice's lawsuit against Microsoft Corp. should proceed and allegations that Microsoft officials destroyed email messages that may be relevant to the case.
http://www.seattletimes.com/news/business/html98/micr_091598.html
A similar story quoting HOVENKAMP appeared in INFOWORLD online, Sept. 15:
http://www.infoworld.com/cgi-bin/displayStory.pl?980915.wcmsruling.htm

MEDICINE ON THE NET, Sept. 15 - A brief item noted that the third edition of the UI Family Practice Handbook is available through the VIRTUAL HOSPITAL.

USA TODAY MAGAZINE, Sept. 15 - A story on the risks and benefits of videotaping births featured research by and comments from Dr. JEROME YANKOWITZ, assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology, and Dr. JOHN ELY, assistant professor of family medicine.

AMERICAN HEALTH FOR WOMEN, Sept. 15 - A brief item noted that UI researchers have found that teaching Alzheimer's patients to calm themselves reduces irritability, aggression, and behavioral problems.

PRODUCT MANAGEMENT TODAY, Sept. 15 - A study by UI researchers who found that the drug alendronate (trade name Fosamax) can ward off osteoporosis in people who take steroid drugs for arthritis, asthma and other diseases was reported. The study was published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

HOME HEALTHCARE CONSULTANT, Sept. 15 - In a roundup of "New Developments in Home Health Care," a brief item noted that the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HEALTH SYSTEM and HELP Innovations of Lawrence, Kan. have teamed up to provide telemedicine services throughout the states.

MCKNIGHT'S LONG-TERM CARE NEWS, Sept. 15 - KEELA HERR, associate professor of nursing, was quoted in a story on new guidelines for pain control in the elderly. Herr said assessing pain can be difficult because many elderly patients assume pain is an inevitable part of their lives and don't report it to their caregivers.

LIBRARY JOURNAL, Sept. 15 - A brief item noted that UI LIBRARIES have received a $60,000 grant to develop a high-tech search engine for the World Wide Web and have opened an exhibition on the 50th anniversary of Henry Wallace's run for the presidency a candidate of the Progressive Party.

(Jacksonville) FLORIDA TIMES-UNION, Sept. 14 - The UI was mentioned as a client of a new software company founded in Jacksonville, Fla. in a story on emerging software entrepreneurs in Florida.

ATLANTA CONSTITUTION, Sept. 14 - Dr. DAN TRANEL, professor of neurology, was quoted in a story on a gathering in Cavendish, Vt. to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the accident that vaulted Phineas P. Gage into medical history. Gage was helping blast away rock for a railroad on Sept. 13, 1848 when a spark set off an explosion that shot a 13-pound metal rod through Gage's skull. He survived, but his personality changed dramatically, giving present-day researchers clues about what areas of the brain control personality.

CHEMICAL AND ENGINEERING NEWS, Sept. 14 - Work by LOUIS MESSERLE, associate professor of chemistry, and his coworkers was featured in a brief item. The group has synthesized a ditungsten anion complex.

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION's Academe Today, Sept. 14 - THE UI MUSEUM OF ART has been awarded $112,500 for general operating support from the federal Institute of Museum and Library Services. The organization awarded $1.2 million to 22 colleges and university museums and libraries.

MIAMI HERALD, Sept. 14 - Dr. DAN TRANEL, professor of neurology, was quoted in a story on a gathering in Cavendish, Vt. to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the accident that vaulted Phineas P. Gage into medical history. Gage was helping blast away rock for a railroad on Sept. 13, 1848 when a spark set off an explosion that shot a 13-pound metal rod through Gage's skull. He survived, but his personality changed dramatically, giving present-day researchers clues about what areas of the brain control personality. The story also appeared in the BOSTON GLOBE.

MIAMI HERALD, Sept. 14 - ARTHUR MILLER, professor of political science, was quoted in a story on the political fallout from the release on the Internet of special prosecutor Ken Starr's report on the Clinton investigation. "Having released Starr's report on the Internet diminishes the role Congress will play in making the decision, because now it's out there in the court of public opinion," Miller said. The story also appeared in the (Phoenix) ARIZONA REPUBLIC.
http://www.herald.com:80/usa/digdocs/073910.htm

REUTERS NEWS SERVICE, Sept. 14 - PETER BLANCK, professor of law, was quoted and his research featured in a column on issues in the workplace distributed by Reuters. The column noted that employment prospects for people with disabilities have brightened considerably since the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act in 1991. The story also appeared in the online version of BUILDER magazine: http://builder.hw.net:80/news/1998/sep/15/work15.htx

BALTIMORE SUN, Sept. 14 - Recent political turmoil surrounding President Clinton has been reflected on the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, according to a story on the IEM's role as a barometer of political opinion. The story quoted ROBERT FORSYTHE, senior associate dean of the College of Business Administration and a founder of the IEM. Forsythe said the IEM is a "great pedagogical product" and noted that the U.S. Department of Education had awarded the college a $443,000 grant to extend the IEM's reach to minority colleges.
http://www.sunspot.net/cgi-bin/editorial/story.cgi?storyid=900000191286

ARIZONA REPUBLIC, Sept. 13 - ETHAN CANIN, faculty member in the UI WRITERS' WORKSHOP, was the focus of a long Q&A, talking about his new appointment at the UI, his new book and other issues.
http://www.azcentral.com:80/ent/books/0913readingroom.shtml

NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW, Sept. 13 - "For Kings and Planets," by ETHAN CANIN, faculty member in the UI WRITERS' WORKSHOP, was reviewed. And "Blizzard of One," a collection of poetry by former Workshop faculty member Mark Strand was reviewed.
Canin: http://www.nytimes.com/books/98/09/13/reviews/980913.13coopert.html
Strand: http://www.nytimes.com/books/98/09/13/reviews/980913.13garrist.html

PARADE MAGAZINE, Sept. 13 - The "What's Up This Week with Books" column featured "The Zeppelin Reader," edited by Robert Hedin and published by the UI PRESS. The item appeared in the CHICAGO TRIBUNE and the HOUSTON CHRONICLE.

OMAHA (Neb.) WORLD-HERALD, Sept. 11 - A story on a five-year, $700,000 grant to the University of Nebraska from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to combat binge drinking noted that the UI has participated in the program since 1996.

USA TODAY, Sept. 11 - In the "Across the USA: News From Every State" roundup, the item for Iowa noted that faculty at the UI are reconsidering whether to award honorary degrees.

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Sept. 11 - A sidebar to a story on prolific scholars noted that ERNEST PASCARELLA, professor of planning, policy and leadership studies, is the second most-cited author in higher education.

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Sept. 11 - "Contesting the Master Narrative: Essays in Social History," edited by SHELTON STROMQUIST and JEFFREY COX, professors of history, published by the UI PRESS, was included in the roundup of "New Scholarly Books."

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Sept. 11 - PHILLIP JONES, vice president for student services, was quoted in a story on the academic version of an urban legend that says the roommate of a student who commits suicide automatically receives all A's. The so-called "suicide rule" is the focus of the movie, "Dead Man on Campus." The issue came up after the death of a Matthew Garofalo in 1995, but the UI has never had such a rule, Jones said.

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Sept. 11 - BENTE VILLADSEN, assistant professor of accounting, was quoted in a story on the use of the federal government's supercomputing resources by faculty in the social sciences. Faculty in the natural sciences have used the free facilities for years, but few faculty outside those disciplines take advantage of them because they use personal computers for most number-crunching, according to the story. Villadsen, who used about 2,500 hours on one of the supercomputers, said the type of research she does just isn't possible on a desktop machine.

NEW YORK TIMES, Sept. 10 - "For Kings and Planets," by ETHAN CANIN, faculty member (and graduate of) the UI WRITERS' WORKSHOP, was reviewed as a "shimmering new novel" whose characters "seem freshly original."

(Edinburgh, Scotland) SCOTSMAN, Sept. 9 - FORREST NELSON, professor of economics, was quoted in a story on electronic markets designed to predict the outcome of Germany's Sept. 27 election. According to the story, Nelson was in Germany to help universities set up an electronic market similar to ones operating at the UI COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION. "As a predictive tool, the markets have worked quite well," Nelson said.

LOS ANGELES TIMES, Sept. 9 - A story on the graduate-writing program at the University of California at Irvine noted that "Many writers consider it second only to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S WRITING PROGRAM, the nation's oldest and best-known graduate-writing workshop." The story also quoted FRANK CONROY, director of the UI Workshop, who had high praise for Irvine's director, Geoffrey Wolff, and said he wished he could have recruited Wolff to Iowa.

OMAHA (Neb.) WORLD-HERALD, Sept. 8 - LARRY ZIMMERMAN, director of the American Indian and Native Studies Program, was quoted in a story on the University of Nebraska at Lincoln's decision to return the remains of American Indians to several Midwestern tribes.

OMAHA (Neb.) WORLD-HERALD, Sept. 8 - A story on the "standardized patient" program, a medical education technique in which otherwise healthy patients act as if they have symptoms of a disease, included an Iowa City resident who works with students at the UI COLLEGE OF MEDICINE.

MEDICAL POST MAGAZINE, Sept. 8 - A brief item on the risks and benefits of videotaping births featured research by Dr. JEROME YANKOWITZ, assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology.

FEDERAL COMPUTER WEEK, Sept. 7 - GERARD RUSHTON, professor of geography, was quoted in a story on the National Cancer Institute's plans to use new digital mapping technology to track possible correlations between breast cancer and pollution in parts of New York and Connecticut.

SEATTLE TIMES, Sept. 7 - BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, professor of sport, health, leisure, and physical studies, was quoted in story on how the lines between work and the rest of life have become blurred, in part because of new technology and in part, because people feel they need to work more to stay ahead. The story, which originally appeared in the LOS ANGELES TIMES, also appeared in the DALLAS MORNING NEWS.

LOS ANGELES TIMES, Sept. 7 - BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, professor of sport, health, leisure, and physical studies, was quoted in a story on how the lines between work and the rest of life have become blurred, in part because of new technology and in part, because people feel they need to work more to stay ahead. "Work has become an end in itself," Hunnicutt said. "It is who you are. It answers the questions of identity, of meaning." The story also appeared in the (Memphis, Tenn.) COMMERCIAL APPEAL.

NEW YORK TIMES, Sept. 7 - An obituary for well-known environmental activist and author Frances Hamerstrom noted that she received a bachelor's degree from the UI. The story also appeared in the SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS.

MODERN HEALTHCARE, Sept. 7 - Dr. WAYNE RICHENBACHER, associate professor of surgery and a cardiothoracic surgeon at UIHC, was quoted in a story on the use of lasers to drill pinholes in the left ventricle of the hearts of angina patients. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the technique to relieve the pain of angina.

NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW, Sept. 6 and 13 - "A Doctor's Story," by Abraham Verghese, graduate of the UI WRITERS' WORKSHOP, was included in a roundup of recommended reading.

(Tacoma, Wash.) NEWS TRIBUNE, Sept. 6 - BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, professor of sport, health, leisure, and physical studies, was quoted in a story on the "historical amnesia" most Americans have when it comes to holidays such as Labor Day.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Sept. 6 - An obituary for Robert L. Lundstedt, former marketing executive for International Harvester, noted that he attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA on a basketball scholarship and earned a bachelor's degree in business administration.

(Denver) ROCKY MOUNTAIN NEWS, Sept. 6 - TIM LOUGHRAN, associate professor of finance, was quoted in a potpourri of expert commentary on turmoil in the stock market. The collection was culled by the business editor from comments he had seen on news wires in the past week.

SALT LAKE TRIBUNE, Sept. 5 - BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, professor of sport, health, leisure, and physical studies, was quoted in a GANNETT NEWS SERVICE story on the "historical amnesia" most Americans have when it comes to holidays such as Labor Day.

CINCINNATI ENQUIRER, Sept. 4 - A story on the health dangers women face from wearing high heel shoes and some of the legal implications of requiring women employees to wear the shoes featured research and comments from MARC LINDER, professor of law, and Dr. CHARLES SALTZMAN, associate professor of orthopedic surgery. The story, originally published in the DES MOINES REGISTER, was carried by GANNETT NEWS SERVICE.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Sept. 4 - Columnist Barry Temkin argued that Northwestern University's basketball program is benefiting from the announcement that 1998-99 would be UI basketball coach TOM DAVIS' last year. Chicago-area recruits have little interest in Iowa -- they are also shunning Iowa State because of Tim Floyd's move to the Chicago Bulls -- and are turning to Northwestern, Temkin said.

USA TODAY, Sept. 4 - A story on the United States wrestling team's trip to Iran for the World Freestyle Wrestling Championships included comments and references to several athletes with UI connections. The story, which emphasized the diplomatic aspects of competing in Iran, relied heavily on comments from LINCOLN MCILRAVY, three-time NCAA champion for the UI, and noted that DAN GABLE, former Iowa wrestling coach would be accompanying the team on its trip.

PITTSBURGH POST-GAZETTE, Sept. 3 - A story on a new novel by Peter Craig, son of actress Sally Field, noted that Craig "went to graduate school at the University of Iowa with its famous WRITERS' WORKSHOP."
http://www.post-gazette.com:80/magazine/19980903craig5.asp

ROLLING STONE, Sept. 3 - Comments from MARC LINDER, professor of law, were included in a story on the cultural, economic and labor effects of fast-food franchises.

EDMONTON (Alberta, Canada) JOURNAL, Sept. 2 - The answer to a letter to the "On Your Life" column pointed out that the Van Allen Belt is named after JAMES VAN ALLEN, UI professor emeritus of physics and astronomy.

MIDWEST INDUSTRIAL PROPERTIES, Sept. 1 - An article about the UI's OAKDALE RESEARCH PARK calls it "a dynamic environment for high technology companies making the transfer from the laboratory to the marketplace."

JURIST: The Legal Professors' Network, Sept. 1 - RANDALL BEZANSON, professor of law, has been named the first Charles E. Floete Distinguished Professor of Law at the UI, according to an item on the electronic news service.

(Louisville, Ky.) COURIER-JOURNAL, Sept. 1 - A story on the health dangers women face from wearing high heel shoes and some of the legal implications of requiring women employees to wear the shoes featured research and comments from MARC LINDER, professor of law, and Dr. CHARLES SALTZMAN, associate professor of orthopaedic surgery. The story, originally published in the DES MOINES REGISTER, was carried by GANNETT NEWS SERVICE.

USA TODAY, Sept. 1 - A story on new discoveries in treating muscular dystrophy included research by and comments from KEVIN CAMPBELL, professor of physiology. Campbell's research group identified a set of genes associated with the diseases. The discovery of a specific gene and a protein, however, may provide a new understanding into how the disease operates, Campbell said. The research was published in the September issue of NATURE GENETICS.

SPOKANE (Wash.) SPOKESMAN REVIEW, Sept. 1 - A syndicated column by CHICAGO TRIBUNE columnist Carol Kleiman featured the career advice of former UI BUSINESS STUDENT Anne H. Reilly who is now an associate professor at Loyola University in Chicago. Reilly earned her MBA from the UI in 1984 while working as a commercial bank officer, the column noted. http://www.spokane.net:80/news-story-body.asp?Date=090198&ID=s444086

OUTSIDE, September - Mark Levine, a contributing editor to OUTSIDE, will be teaching next spring at the UI WRITERS' WORKSHOP, according to the magazine's contributor notes. Levine wrote a feature story on the area near Atlin, British Columbia, a remote, glacier-scarred area in the northwest of Canada.
Story: http://outside.starwave.com:80/magazine/0998/9809world.html
Contributor notes: http://outside.starwave.com:80/magazine/0998/9809btl.html

INDIVIDUAL INVESTOR, September - TIMOTHY LOUGHRAN, associate professor of finance, was quoted in a story on "axioms" of the investment business that may need to be re-examined. For the axiom "IPOs Will Make You Rich" Loughran pointed out that most IPOs are overvalued from the start, leaving new investors little chance to make a lot of money.

SHAPE, September - A column on people who seem to be "accident prone" relied on research and comments by DAVID C. SCHWEBEL, doctoral student in psychology, and JODIE PLUMERT, associate professor of psychology. The two published a paper in the Journal of Experimental Child Psychology on why some children often overestimate their physical abilities and get hurt.

LIFETIMES, September - The work of JAMES VAN ALLEN, professor emeritus of physics and astronomy, was the focus of a story in the newsletter of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Illinois.

PARENTS, September - BREAKTHROUGH TO LITERACY (located at the TECHNOLOGY INNOVATION CENTER) was featured in a roundup of "Top-Notch Teaching Plans" designed to boost academic performance.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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