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CONTACT: PETER ALEXANDER
100 Old Public Library
Iowa City IA 52242
(319) 384-0072; fax (319) 384-0024
e-mail: peter-alexander@uiowa.edu

Release: Immediate

UI CAMPUS NOTES -- IOWA CENTER FOR THE ARTS

EARLY PIANO MUSIC SEPT. 27 -- Fortepianist Susanne Skyrm will perform music of the 18th and early 19th centuries at 1:30 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 27 in the Senate Chamber of Old Capitol on the University of Iowa campus.

Skyrm's performance, a joint presentation of the UI School of Music and the Iowa City Early Keyboard Society, will be free and open to the public.

Skyrm will play the fortepiano, a predecessor of the modern grand piano. The term generally refers to the piano of the 18th and early 19th centuries, which had a generally lighter and clearer tone than the modern piano. The lighter sound makes it easier to hear the individual lines and layers of the texture from which Classic music is constructed.

Skyrm's program will consist entirely of sonatas by a variety of both well known and little known composers of the late Baroque and Classic periods in music, including Domenico Scarlatti, Padre Antonio Soler, Manuel Blanco de Nebra, Joseph Haydn and Muzio Clementi.

Skyrm teaches piano at the University of South Dakota. She is a founding member of the Dakota Baroque and Classic Company, a touring ensemble that performs on accurate copies of historical musical instruments from the collection of the Shrine to Music Museum in Vermillion, S.D. She has also given recitals on the museum's period pianos, including a Viennese piano from about 1815. She has performed at national and regional meetings of the American Musical Instrument Society, Midwest Historical Keyboard Society, Southeastern Historical Keyboard Society and the American Musicological Society.

Skyrm also teaches and performs on the modern piano, and she has given recitals throughout the United States and Europe. She has a special interest in Iberian keyboard music of the 18th century and has given both recitals and lectures on this repertoire. A CD of 18th-century of this music that she recorded on a Portuguese fortepiano from 1767 at the Shrine to Music Museum was recently released on the Music and Arts label.

Skyrm holds degrees from Albertson College in Idaho, the University of Cincinnati and the University of Colorado. Her teachers have included the renowned fortepianist Malcolm Bilson, and she has performed in master classes with Gyorgy Sebok, Menahem Pressler and Ann Schein.

NOTE TO BROADCASTERS: Skyrm is pronounced "skerm" (rhymes with term).

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IWP AND WRITERS' WORKSHOP READINGS SERIES SEPT. 27 ­ The University of Iowa International Writing Program (IWP) and the Iowa Writers' Workshop will present a joint reading by Korean novelist and poet Han Kang and writer Justin Tussing at 5 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 27 in the Prairie Lights Bookstore at 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City. The reading is free and open to the public.

Han Kang began her writing career in 1993 with the publication of a number of poems. In 1994 she was awarded a prize in the annual literary contest held by Seoul-Shinmun, the national newspaper. Her first book of short stories, "The Love of Yeosu," was published in 1995, and her first novel, "The Black Deer," was published this summer.

Tussing is a second-year graduate student in the Iowa Writers' Workshop at the UI.

The IWP is a unique residency program, which each fall assembles a community of established writers from all parts of the globe. This fall 19 writers from 18 countries will spend three months at the UI.

NOTE TO BROADCASTERS: Han Kang is pronounced /hahn kahng/.

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ROBIN HEMLEY WILL READ AT PRAIRIE LIGHTS SEPT. 28 ­ Two-time Pushcart Prize winner Robyn Hemley will read from his new memoir, "Nola," at 8 p.m. Monday, Sept. 28 at Prairie Lights Books, 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City. The reading is free and open to the public.

Reviewer Brett Lott wrote Hemley's book: "Powerful, moving, genuinely gut-wrenching without losing its own sense of humor and pathos, Nola is one of the best works of nonfiction I've read in years."

A graduate of the Iowa Writers' Workshop, Hemley has written several fiction and nonfiction books including "Turning Life into Fiction," "The Last Studebaker," "All you can Eat" and "The Big Ear." Hemley has twice been awarded the Pushcart Prize, and he has also received first prize in the Nelson Algren Award competition from the Chicago Tribune and the George Garrett Award. He teaches creative writing at Western Washington University in Bellingham.

The reading will be broadcast live on radio stations WSUI AM 910 and WOI AM 640.

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PERSPECTIVES SEPT. 30--Valerie Hedquist, associate professor of art at Central College, Pella, will give a lecture and gallery tour on European prints from the 15th-17th centuries at 12:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 30 in the University of Iowa Museum of Art.

This presentation, which is part of the museum's weekly Perspectives series, will be open to the public free of charge.

Hedquist's presentation will focus on works by Durer, Rembrandt and Callot from the museum's permanent collection and will explore the influence these artists had on printmakers of their time.

Printmaking began in the mid-15th century with the invention of engraving and movable type. Print shops appeared soon after and began producing vast amounts of wood-cut-illustrated books and broadsheets to meet the demands of a public captivated by an accessible and affordable medium. Prints were produced in editions and were less expensive than unique paintings. Consequently their ownership was not restricted to the wealthy. Books, cards and single prints quickly spread throughout Europe, permitting an exchange of stylistic and technical ideas.

Hedquist said, "In France, Callot made tremendous technical advances in etching, while the German Durer made strides through his use of woodcuts for publication. It is truly amazing to see how these few individuals were able to move their art ahead into a new direction."

The UI Museum of Art, located on North Riverside Drive in Iowa City, is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. the day of Hedquist's talk.. Admission is free. Public metered parking is available in UI parking lots across from the museum on Riverside Drive, and adjacent to the UI Alumni Center, which is just north of the museum.

M.C. Ginsberg Objects of Art, Inc. of Iowa City is the corporate sponsor for the 1998-99 Perspectives series at the UI Museum of Art through the University of Iowa Foundation.

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INTERNATIONAL WRITERS DISCUSS TRANSLATION SEPT. 30 ­ The University of Iowa International Writing Program (IWP) will present a panel discussion on the process of translation at 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 30 in Room 304 of the UI English Philosophy Building on the UI campus. The event is free and open to the public.

Titled "The Writer as Translator," the panel will discuss what writers bring to the translation process, and what they gain or lose in the process.

Participants in the discussion will be Fabian Andres Casas of Argentina, Agnieszka Kolakowska of Poland, German Carrasco of Chile, Beatrice Kobow of Germany, Erendiz Atasu Sayron of Turkey and Daniel Weissbort of the UI faculty.

Casas is a permanent contributor to the cultural section of Argentina's largest daily newspaper, Clarin, and is editor of the literary supplement. His first volume of poems, "Tuca," was chosen as the Poetry Book of the Year by Diario de Poesia en Argentina. Casas received first prize from the Argentina Authors' Society in 1992 and first prize from Columbia Prometeo Foundation in 1994.

Kolakowska is widely published as a translator from Polish and French into English. Her translations have appeared in numerous magazines, and she has published articles in the Salisbury Review, the Times and other periodicals. She is fluent in English, French, Hebrew and Polish; and she speaks and reads German, Greek, Italian, Latin and Spanish.

Carrasco is the author of "Brindis," which received a prize in the House of the Americas Contest in Cuba. His works have also appeared in various anthologies, two publications from the University of Chile and Perrrera Arte.

Kobow has published her prose in various magazines, including Kabeljau, the magazine of the Literaturinstitut where she got her diploma in prose and poetry.

Sayron produced four collections of short stories that explore issues of feminism and gender before publishing her first novel, "Dagin Oteki Yuzu" (The Other Side of the Mountain), in 1996. The novel won the prestigious Orhan Kemal Prize that year and is currently being translated into English.

The IWP is a unique residency program, which each fall assembles a community of established writers from all parts of the globe. This fall 19 writers from 18 countries will spend three months at the UI.

NOTE TO BROADCASTERS: Fabian Casas is pronounced /fahb YAHN/ /KAH sas/; German Carrasco is pronounced 'hehr MAHN/ /ka RAS koh/; Agnieszka Kolakowska is pronounced /ahn YESH kah/ / koh loh KOHF shkah/; Beatrice Kobow is pronounced /bay ah TREES/ /KOH boh/. Erendiz Atasu Sayron is pronounced /er EHN dees/ /at AH soo/ /SIGH rahn/.

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ROBERT CLARK WILL READ AT PRAIRIE LIGHTS SEPT. 30 ­ Novelist Robert Clark will read from his new book, "Mr. White's Confession," at 8 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 30 at Prairie Lights Books at 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City. The reading is free and open to the public.

"[Clark] has an ear for dialogue that's pitch perfect and an impeccable eye for detail," writes Ruth Coughlin of the New York Times Book Review.

Clark's other books include "In the Deep Midwinter," "River of the West" and "The Solace of Food," a biography of James Beard.

The reading will be broadcast live on radio stations WSUI AM 910 and WOI AM 640, as part of the "Live From Prairie Lights" series.

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ANDRE ALEXIS READS AT PRAIRIE LIGHTS OCT. 1 -- Canadian writer Andre Alexis will read from his debut novel, "Childhood," at 8 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 1 at Prairie Lights Books, 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City. The reading is free and open to the public.

Alexis is the author of "Despair and other stories of Ottawa," a collection of short stories that was shortlisted for a Regional Commonwealth Prize. His work has appeared in literary journals and anthologies, and he has been playwright-in-residence at the Canadian Stage Company. He is a contributing editor for This Magazine as well as a reviewer for the Toronto Globe and Mail.

The reading will be broadcast live on radio stations WSUI AM 910 and WOI AM 640640, as part of the "Live From Prairie Lights" series.

-30- 9/18/98