The University of Iowa
University News Services
Archives Services Contact Us A-Z Search

UI in the News

October, 1998

See UI in the New Archive Index

NEW YORK TIMES, Oct. 30 - A review of a Jackson Pollock retrospective, opening Nov. 1 at the Museum of Modern Art, notes that his "first great painting, 'Mural,' " owned by the UI MUSEUM OF ART is included, giving those outside Iowa City a rare chance to view the painting, since it almost never leaves the UI Museum.

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Oct. 30 - An article about who is teaching freshman composition courses in an age of declining graduate enrollments in English focuses on the UI as a place where teaching assistants for freshman rhetoric come from a variety of departments. The article notes that a Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching report released last April hailed the UI for staffing freshman rhetoric courses with graduate students outside English. TAKIS POULAKOS, chair of the rhetoric department is quoted in the article saying the UI, "wants the best T.A.s from throughout the university, not just whatever is available" in English or communications. The article also quotes graduate students Dirk Deam (political science), Valerie A. Kidrick (art history), and Brigittine M. French (anthropology) about their experiences teaching rhetoric.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v45/i10/10a01201.htm (password needed)

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Oct. 30 - A letter to the editor by PHILLIP JONES, dean of students, and STEVE PARROTT, associate director of university relations outlines several reasons universities should worry about their students' binge drinking. "Reducing the personal, social, and economic harm caused by binge drinkers requires that we take what has been called an environmental approach to the problem The environmental approach recognizes that there is no single solution that will eliminate drinking to get drunk," they write. "Instead, we have to try any and all approaches that show promise for reducing the problem."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v45/i10/10b01202.htm (password needed)

THE PRESS (New Zealand), Oct. 30 - New Zealand's first national swimming coach, Brett Naylor, says coming to the UI on a swimming scholarship in 1977 changed his outlook on life. " Iowa changed my whole work ethic," he said. "It was at university that I developed more of a love for the sport. I didn't intend to be a coach when I started university. It wasn't until I got on the poolside in my last year, and did some coaching that I began to consider it as a career."
http://www.press.co.nz:80/43/98103077.htm

KANSAS CITY STAR, Oct. 29 - An article about the NCAA's attempt to hold back $10 million it was supposed to distribute to member schools quotes BOB BOWLSBY, UI athletics director, saying the plan is unfair. The NCAA wants to put the money into an escrow account and then use it to pay damages in a case it lost when a judge ruled against its policy of restricting lower-tier coaches' salaries to $16,000 a year.

BASLER ZEITUNG, Oct. 29 - An article about the competition in marketing arts events notes that HANCHER AUDITORIUM used an innovative marketing tool to interest people in its presentation of "Dracula," a new ballet. For two days before the show a local blood bank held a blood drive in Hancher's lobby and all donors were given a $5 discount on tickets.

WALL STREET JOURNAL, Oct. 29 - An article about how university law clinics can draw fire from legislatures for defending unpopular clients or taking controversial cases mentions the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA LAW CLINIC. "Years ago, state legislators tried to shut down a University of Iowa law clinic after it successfully launched a suit over conditions in the state's prison system."

VILLAGE VOICE, Oct. 28 - An article about the Frick Collection's showing of the Victorian Fairy Painting exhibition called it "an exquisite exhibition of 34 works organized by the University of Iowa MUSEUM OF ART with London's Royal Academy of Arts." The collection is on display in New York through Jan. 17.
http://www.villagevoice.com/arts/9844/camhi2.shtml

TELEGRAM & GAZETTE (Worcester, Mass.) Oct. 28 - An Associated Press article about the limited use of the chicken pox vaccine says some doctors feel the vaccine could lose potency later in life, and chicken pox is more serious in adults than in children. The article quotes RICHARD NELSON, executive associate dean of the UI College of Medicine and an official with the Academy of Pediatrics, saying HMOs have no excuse not to actively promote the chickenpox vaccine. "When you are not promoting it and informing people you are exposing yourself to liability when someone has an adverse reaction to the disease," he said. This article also appeared in the WALL STREET JOURNAL (Oct. 27).

USA TODAY, Oct. 27 - An editorial says the NCAA "oversteps its expertise when it fails to accept legitimate college prep courses that have been designed and tested by educators." The paper cites the case of UI student Erika Twedt, who was unable to participate with the UI WOMEN'S ROWING team as a freshman last fall in spite of a 3.7 G.P.A. because the NCAA wouldn't approve three of her high school English courses.

WALL STREET JOURNAL, Oct. 27 - An Associated Press article about the limited use of the chicken pox vaccine says some doctors feel the vaccine could lose potency later in life, and chicken pox is more serious in adults than in children. The article quotes RICHARD NELSON, executive associate dean of the UI College of Medicine and an official with the Academy of Pediatrics, saying HMOs have no excuse not to actively promote the chickenpox vaccine. "When you are not promoting it and informing people you are exposing yourself to liability when someone has an adverse reaction to the disease," he said. This story also appeared on ABCnews.com:
http://www.abcnews.com:80/sections/living/DailyNews/chickenpox981027.html

CNN HEADLINE NEWS, Oct. 26 - MICHAEL LOVAGLIA, a UI professor of sociology, was interviewed about his new research showing that fear of success can lower students' scores on standardized tests.

LOS ANGELES TIMES, Oct. 25 - An article about job opportunities for the disabled cited a study by PETER BLANCK, a UI professor of law and director of the Law, Health Policy and Disability Center at the UI. The study, which was released in summer 1998, reported that unemployment dropped from 38 percent to 14 percent between 1990 and 1997 among a group of 5,000 people in Oklahoma who are mentally retarded or have other mental impairments.
http://www.latimes.com/sbin/iawrapper?NS-search-set=/3639f/aaaa002tb39fe88&NS-doc-offset=3&NS-adv-search=0&

NEW YORK TIMES, Oct. 23 - An article about the Victorian Fairy Painting exhibit, which is now on display at the Frick Collection in New York City through Jan. 17, notes that the exhibit was organized by the UI MUSEUM OF ART.

PHILADELPHIA NEWS, Oct. 23 - A roundup of current thoughts about the Clinton/Lewinsky scandal quotes from UI Writers' Workshop Director FRANK CONROY's op-ed in the Oct. 22 New York Times. He wrote, in part, "If any mood can be said to prevail in Iowa as we approach the elections, it is a sense of shame"

NEW YORK TIMES, Oct. 22 - FRANK CONROY, director of the UI Writers' Workshop, published a guest opinion on "Iowa's Quiet Voters," analyzing Iowans' approach to the upcoming elections in the wake of the Clinton-Lewinsky scandal. "Iowans will vote on the issues: agriculture, education, drugs (a surprising methamphetamine problem has emerged around the state -- not big, but pesky) and the economics of health care. Some observers anticipate a lower voter turnout across the board, but that's all. Iowans will vote as if the scandal never occurred," he wrote.

WALL STREET JOURNAL, Oct. 22 - A story on Tony Kushner's new play, "Hydriotaphia, or the Death of Dr. Browne" (sub-subtitled "An Epic Farce About Death and Primitive Capital Accumulation in Five Scenes"), noted that student productions of early versions of the play were presented at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and New York University before its "world premiere" at the Berkeley Repertory Theatre.

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Oct. 21 - A story in the information technology section of the Chronicle's Web edition describes a Web site created by ENRIQUE CARRASCO, UI law professor, which explains the effects of global economic turmoil in layman's terms. "I've become convinced over the years that there is this huge gap between experts -- who talk this lingo, this jargon -- and everybody else," Carrasco says. "The students and I decided we would do our best to write in plain English for anyone who may not have an extensive background in international finance. We wanted to focus on people ranging from students to farmers who might be interested in this." (This article also appears in the Oct. 30 print edition of The Chronicle.)
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v45/i10/10a03101.htm (password needed)

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Oct. 23 - A listing of recent gifts and bequests to colleges and universities noted that Prem and Urmila Sahai have given $3.7-million from to the UI COLLEGE OF MEDICINE.

SPOKANE (Wash.) SPOKESMAN-REVIEW, Oct. 23 - An Associated Press article notes that UI economics professor JOHN SOLOW is testifying as an antitrust expert in the state's tobacco lawsuit. Solow is testifying as a state expert witness that tobacco companies conspired after a 1953 meeting to stop competing on health issues. After that, tobacco companies changed the focus of their advertising from health issues to flavor and pleasure in smoking, Solow says. AP accounts of the trial have also appeared in the PORTLAND OREGONIAN.

REUTERS, Oct. 22 - The HEARTLAND POLL, conducted by UI political science professor ARTHUR MILLER predicts that Democrats are more likely to vote than Republicans in upcoming elections. The poll also found that although President Clinton's personal popularity has declined, the majority of Midwestern voters still view him as a strong leader. Miller said: "His strength of leadership, his willingness to go out and get things done, and the perception that he's a very compassionate individual who cares about others turns out to be much more important than (voters') perception of ... morality."
http://www.infoseek.com/Content?arn=a3701roptz-19981022&qt=%22University+of+Iowa%22&sv=IS&lk=noframes&col=NX&kt=A&ak=news1486

SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER, Oct. 21 - UI economics professor JOHN SOLOW testified as an antitrust expert in a tobacco lawsuit in Washington state. He testified that internal documents showed that Philip Morris Inc. and British American Tobacco Co. Ltd. agreed to set prices and market share in several Latin American countries.

ASBURY PARK (N.J.) PRESS, Oct. 21 - A roundup of medical information web sites includes a brief description and URL for the HARDIN META DIRECTORY OF INTERNET HEALTH SOURCES.

ORANGE COUNTY (Calif.) REGISTER, Oct. 20 - A brief item notes that the UI has renamed its ADVANCED LEARNING TECHNOLOGIES CENTER in the College of Business for alumnus Jerre Stead and his wife Mary Joy. The center, the first of its kind in an American business school, provides faculty, students, and staff with support to create online lessons and assignments.

USA TODAY, Oct. 20 - The work of Johan Hultin, a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, was included in a story on efforts to unravel the virus strain that caused the 1918 flu pandemic. Hultin (identified as Holtin in the story) made several trips to Alaska as a UI microbiology graduate student and later returned to the area to take sample of native Alaskans who died from the flu and were preserved in frozen ground. (Hultin's UI connections were uncredited in the story.)

LOS ANGELES TIMES, Oct. 19 - A long feature story on the problem of binge drinking on college campuses featured the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and its efforts to curb the problem. MARY SUE COLEMAN, UI president, and PHILLIP JONES, vice president for student services, were quoted. "The personal responsibility approach is not going to suffice; there are too many pressures," Coleman said. "We are talking about the environment and the culture we create that leads to something like a student's death."
http://www.latimes.com/sbin/iawrapper?NS-search-set=/3639f/aaaa002tb39fe88&NS-doc-offset=0&NS-adv-search=0&

USA TODAY, Oct. 19 - Dr. MICHAEL TODD, professor of anesthesia and editor-in-chief of the journal Anesthesiology, was quoted in a story on lessons in group decision-making that medicine could learn from the airline industry. "Aviation has these rules about how you do things. There is a growing recognition that things in the aviation world apply in the medical world."

KANSAS CITY STAR, Oct. 18 - In an article about why many people report feeling unhappy with their lives, DAVID WATSON, a UI professor of psychology, said one reason may be that "simple pleasures are boring." He said people have unrealistic expectations of life, love, and success created by television, movies, and the advertising world. Americans want more and enjoy it less. "We do tend to lead our lives chasing after shadows," Watson said. "Things that at one level we think will make us happy, but ultimately do not, money being a chief example." This article also appeared in THE (Newark, N.J.) STAR-LEDGER (Oct. 20), ORLANDO (Fla.) SENTINAL (Oct. 21), THE (Portland) OREGONIAN (Oct. 25), and PITTSBURGH POST-GAZETTE.

SARASOTA (Fla.) HERALD-TRIBUNE, Oct. 18 - What will we call the first decade of the 21st century? UI history professor KENNETH CMIEL says there is no precedent from the 20th century because the practice of naming decades didn't begin until the 1930, "when folks looked back longingly on the 'roaring Twenties'." He says Decadism has also been boosted by recurring nostalgia fads. As to what to call the next decade, Cmiel says, "I have no idea." This article also appeared in THE (Oklahoma City) JOURNAL RECORD (Oct. 19), THE (Louisville, Ky.) COURIER JOURNAL (Oct. 20), and the AKRON BEACON JOURNAL (Nov. 26).
http://www.ohio.com/auto-docs/docs/007154.htm

TULSA WORLD, Oct. 18 - An article about the development of "antisense" technology, which is based on the concept that small snippets of DNA can serve as drugs by blocking the action of specific genes, quotes ARTHUR KRIEG, a UI professor of internal medicine. He said that once the research was opened up by the availability of oligonucleotides, many researchers began conducting experiments without the standard controls that would verify results. Krieg, who edits the journal "Antisense and Nucleic Acid Drug Development," said that just 5 to 10 percent of the paper published during that time yielded reproducible results.

THE PALM BEACH (Fla.) POST, Oct. 18 - An article about job opportunities for the disabled cited a study by PETER BLANCK, a UI professor of law and director of the Law, Health Policy and Disability Center at the UI. The study, which was released in summer 1998, reported that unemployment dropped from 38 percent to 14 percent between 1990 and 1997 among a group of 5,000 people in Oklahoma who are mentally retarded or have other mental impairments. This article also appeared in the LOS ANGELES TIMES-ORANGE COUNTY EDITION (Oct. 25).

SUBACUTE CARE TODAY, Oct. 15 - A brief item notes that a UI study found that children with severe brain injuries are significantly more likely to develop psychiatric disorders. In the study 63 percent of the children with severe brain injuries developed new psychiatric disorders within two years of injury. That compared to 21 percent in a comparison group of children with mild brain injuries.

PT - Magazine of Physical Therapy, Oct. 15 - A summary of recent grant recipients includes three awards to faculty in the UI College of Medicine. MARTIN BILODEAU, assistant professor in the department of physical therapy, has been awarded a one-year grant from the college. KATHLEEN SLUKA, assistant professor in the department of physical therapy, has been awarded a three-year Arthritis Foundation Research Grant. RICHARD SHIELDS, associate professor in the department of physical therapy, has been awarded a two-year grant from the Paralyzed Veterans of America, Spinal Cord Research Foundation.

ROCHESTER DEMOCRAT AND CHRONICLE, Oct. 15 - An article explains a study that showed the financial and psychological benefits of treating chronically ill children with intensive individual care from a team of specialists who come to the home. Instead of keeping the children in hospitals, a case manager coordinates the nursing, psychological, physical therapy, and nutritional care a sick child needs and those services are delivered in the child's home. RICHARD NELSON, a UI professor of pediatrics, said the new study could prove beneficial and that health maintenance organizations should consider it in their treatment protocols.

VISION MAGAZINE, Oct. 15 - A brief item notes that CRAIG HOLT, UI associate professor of psychiatry and psychology, has found that a good conversation doesn't always leave a person feeling good. Holt says that people who are anxious in social situations experience more negative feelings about themselves during a good conversation with someone they don't know well. If conversing is difficult he says anxious people don't have much time to think about their negative feelings about themselves.

HOME HEALTH PROJECTS, Oct. 15 - A brief item announces that resourceLINK of Iowa and Home Care Iowa will provide statewide telehome care services in Iowa. ResourceLINK is a joint venture between the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HEALTH SYSTEM and HELP Innovations Inc. of Lawrence, Kan. MICHAEL KIENZLE, associate dean of the UI College of Medicine, is quoted saying "the long-term goal is to allow the two organizations to share services, reduce health care costs, and improve patient outcomes."

THE AMERICAN NURSE, Oct. 15 - A story about workplace trends reports on research conducted by MARY BLEGEN, associate professor and associate dean of the UI COLLEGE OF NURSING, which found that inpatient care units with higher proportions of care delivered by registered nurses have lower rates of medication errors, patient falls, and other adverse patient outcomes.

ACADEME, Oct. 15 - An article written by a professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in response to a proposed revision to a section of the university's sexual harassment policy dealing with student-teacher relationships criticizes the new language for being similar to a policy at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The author says that the UI policy "encourages third-party reporting, which leads to an atmosphere of suspicion and tattling that is deleterious to a productive and moral community life."

ACADEME, Oct. 15 - A review of The Sun Still Shone: Professors Talk about Retirement, by LORRAINE DORFMAN, director of the UI Aging Studies Program, says the book is "a much-needed advisory on academic retirement." The reviewer says the book's primary strength is its use of real professors telling their stories of recent or approaching retirement. The book is "an important contribution to understanding the retirement process and should be in every academic bookstore, dean's office, library, and personnel office."

NEW YORK TIMES, Oct. 15 - Richard Francaviglia, author of "Main Street Revisited," published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, was quoted in a story on Marceline, Mo. and Fort Collins, Colo., the boyhood homes of Walt Disney and one of his early collaborators. The towns' streetscapes were major inspirations for Disney's "Main Street USA" concept for his theme parks. That concept, in turn, has clouded people's ideas about what "main street" should look like, Francaviglia said.

USA TODAY, Oct. 15 - In the "Across the USA: News From Every State" roundup, the Iowa item noted that "some members of the Iowa Board of Regents said their indecision over a proposed tuition increase stems from their concerns that 5.2 percent is too much, especially given the state of the farm economy."

KIWANIS MAGAZINE, Oct. 15 - Dr. MICHAEL VANNIER, professor and head of radiology, was quoted in a brief story on a study to use new computer three-dimensional imaging techniques to create better prosthesis devices for patients.

REUTERS NEWS SERVICE, Oct. 14 - Dr. VERA LOENING-BAUCKE, professor of pediatrics, was quoted in a story on a study that indicates cow's milk may contribute to constipation in infants and toddlers. Loening-Baucke, wrote an editorial to accompany the study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine.New England Journal of Medicine editorial:
http://www.nejm.org/content/1998/0339/0016/1155.asp

USA TODAY, Oct. 14 - In the "Across the USA: News From Every State" roundup, the Iowa item noted that "Recently unionized nurses and professional staff at UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS are asking for a 10 percent wage increase during the first year of their first contract and 5 percent the second year. The Iowa Board of Regents' bargaining team will present its proposal to the union on Oct. 30. It will contain no proposals on wages, a regents spokesman said."

FORT WORTH (Texas) STAR-TELEGRAM, Oct. 14 - A story on a Baylor University orthopedic surgeon whose hobby is making plaster casts of the hands of famous people noted that he used to work at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.star-telegram.com:80/news/doc/1047/1:STATE56/1:STATE56101598.html

NEWSPLANET, Oct. 13 - The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA was mentioned as one of several campuses where National Coming Out Day activities drew larger crowds and took on new meaning after the beating death of Matthew Shepard, a gay University of Wyoming student. (NewsPlanet is the news channel of the PlanetOut website.)
http://www.planetout.com/pno/news/article.html?1998/10/13/1

NEW YORK TIMES, Oct. 13 - "Victorian Fairy Painting," an exhibition originally organized by the UI MUSEUM OF ART and the Royal Academy of Arts in London, opens at the Frick Collection at noon Wednesday, Oct. 14, according to the "Culture Notes" column.

The CINCINNATI ENQUIRER, Oct. 13 - An article about a legal challenge to a campaign television ad in the Ohio governor's race quotes BRUCE GRONBECK, UI professor of communication studies, saying that the Democratic candidate's attempt to quash his challenger's ad because it allegedly was based on lies would not hold up in court. "I would be very surprised if the restraining order could stick," he said. "The First Amendment has always stopped these types of complaints cold."

NURSING WEEKLY, Oct. 12 - E. PETER GREENBERG, UI professor of microbiology, is quoted in an article about the implications of new research on biofilms (intricately organized colonies of billions of bacteria that work together to defend against attack). "This is basic research, but it leads us into two research directions," he says. "It may help find a way to remove the biofilm or to make it weaker and more responsive to antibiotics."

DAILY NEWS (Woodland Hills, Calif.), Oct. 12 - BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, UI professor of sport, health, leisure, and physical studies, was quoted in a column on a growing trend toward "compressed workweeks" for American workers. The idea of working four, 10-hour days gained currency briefly in the 1970s as a business-backed alternative to calls for a 32-hour workweek, Hunnicutt said. He said he opposes the schedule because it "simply bunches the time so it's nothing but work or nothing but leisure." The article also appeared in THE (Raleigh, N.C.) NEWS & OBSERVER (Oct. 20). The story originally appeared in the DALLAS MORNING NEWS.

OMAHA WORLD-HERALD, Oct. 12 - At a symposium in Great Bend, Kan., organized by groups opposed to corporate hog farming, KENDALL THU of the UI department of preventive medicine told participants that much of the research into corporate hog farming is financed by those interested in promoting such farms. He said that research puts corporate hog farming in a positive light because it ignores such social impacts as community distrust, intense conflict, and neighbor pitted against neighbor.

COLUMBUS (Ohio) DISPATCH, Oct. 11 - The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA was one of several universities whose endowments were affected by the collapses of hedge funds, a story noted.
http://www.dispatch.com/news/bus98/endo11xent.html

WICHITA (Kan.) EAGLE, Oct. 11 - KENDALL THU, associate research scientist in the department of preventive medicine, was quoted on the effects of large-scale hog production in modern agriculture. Thu participated in a symposium on the issue of large hoglots in south-central Kansas. "Pork production is becoming consolidated into corporate hands at the expense of rural communities in this country," he said. "Period. Case closed."
http://www.wichitaeagle.com/news/environment/docs/hog1011_txt.htm

DETROIT NEWS, Oct. 10 - A brief item on Jack Olds, a volunteer for a charity arts program in Michigan noted that Olds had taught at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA earlier in his career.
http://detnews.com:80/1998/features/9810/10/10100045.htm

DETROIT FREE PRESS, Oct. 9 - A brief item describes the "National Mad as Hell" campaign, started by UI professors STEVE and LESLEA COLLINS. Their grassroots campaign is based on anger and frustration at the time and resources being spent on the Clinton impeachment inquiry.

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Oct. 9 - MARY SUE COLEMAN, president of the University of Iowa, published a guest essay on the quality and value of public university education. (Subscription required for link:)
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v45/i07/07b00801.htm

THE STAR LEDGER (Newark, N.J.), Oct. 9 - An item about the current state of the Clinton scandal and impeachment investigation mentions the "National Mad as Hell Campaign" started by LESLEA and STEVE COLLINS, both UI professors.

REUTERS NEWS SERVICE, Oct. 8 - A story on Steve and Leslea Collins' campaign to stop the impeachment process against President Clinton noted that both Collinses are "professors at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA."
http://www.infoseek.com/Content?arn=a2324LBY246reulb-19981008&qt=%2BReuters+%2BIowa&sv=IS&lk=noframes&col=NX&kt=A&ak=news1486

NEW YORK TIMES, Oct. 8 - "Seeing and Believing: How the Telescope Opened Our Eyes and Minds to the Heavens," by UI WRITERS WORKSHOP graduate Richard Panek, was reviewed.

DETROIT FREE PRESS, Oct. 8 - A brief item noted that author STUART DYBEK, a visiting professor in the UI Writers' Workshop, has been named one of 11 recipients of the annual Lannan Literary Awards. Dybek teaches at Western Michigan University.
http://www.freep.com:80/fun/people/qnames8.htm

WASHINGTON POST, Oct. 7 - A story on the creators of the independent, low-budget film "Untitled DC" noted that the movie actually got its start at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where the producers met as students.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/style/movies/features/untitleddcpreview.htm

FAMILY CIRCLE, Oct. 6 - Research by Dr. INGRID NYGAARD, associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology, was included in a story on "10 Amazing but Simple Health Secrets." The story reported Nygaard's research that women who suffer from incontinence during exercise dramatically reduce urine leakage if they insert a tampon before exercising.

SAN JOSE (Calif.) MERCURY NEWS, Oct. 6 - In a roundup of science and technology news, a brief item noted that a paper appearing in next month's journal Geophysical Research Letters argues that the data that led to the small-comet theory of LOUIS A. FRANK, professor of physics and astronomy, has been misinterpreted. The University of California at Berkeley researchers argue that "camera noise" explains many of the images Frank has posited as evidence that thousands of ice comets bombard Earth's atmosphere daily, adding water to the air and seas as they disintegrate above the planet. A brief item also appeared in the "Science Watch" column of the NEW YORK TIMES.

FAMILY CIRCLE, Oct. 6 - Research by Dr. INGRID NYGAARD, associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology, was included in a story on "10 Amazing but Simple Health Secrets." The story reported Nygaard's research that women who suffer from incontinence during exercise dramatically reduce urine leakage if they insert a tampon before exercising.

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION's Academe Today, Oct. 6 - The UI FOUNDATION was one of several university endowments that lost money when the hedge-fund operator Everest Capital Ltd. collapsed, according to a story in the daily online version of the Chronicle. Others included Yale, Brown and Emory. ALAN SWANSON, vice president for communications and administration at the Foundation, said the UI lost about $4.6 million, less than 1 percent of its $558 million endowment, and said the loss was an exception in an otherwise good market year. (Chronicle subscription required for link:)
http://chronicle.com/daily/98/10/98100603n.htm

BERGEN (N.J.) RECORD, Oct. 5 - BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, UI professor of sport, health, leisure, and physical studies, was quoted in a column on a growing trend toward "compressed workweeks" for American workers. The idea of working four, 10-hour days gained currency briefly in the 1970s as a business-backed alternative to calls for a 32-hour workweek, Hunnicutt said. He said he opposes the schedule because it "simply bunches the time so it's nothing but work or nothing but leisure." The story, which originally appeared in the DALLAS MORNING NEWS, also appeared in the CHICAGO TRIBUNE, the TOLEDO (Ohio) BLADE, the ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH, the (Riverside, Calif.) PRESS-ENTERPRISE, the OMAHA (Neb.) WORLD-HERALD, the PROVIDENCE (R.I.) JOURNAL, the RECORD (Hackensack, N.J.), the ALBUQUERQUE JOURNAL, and the AKRON (Ohio) BEACON JOURNAL.
http://www.bergen.com:80/biz/mini05199810052.htm

USA TODAY, Oct. 5 - EMMETT VAUGHAN, professor of finance and dean of the Division of Continuing Education, was quoted in a story on renewed efforts to create a federal program to help share the costs of insuring against catastrophic disasters, such as hurricanes.

MODERN HEALTHCARE, Oct. 5 - ROGER TRACY, director of the College of Medicine's Office of Statewide Clinical Education Programs, was quoted in an ASSOCIATED PRESS story on new efforts by physician hospital organizations (PHO's) to keep primary-care doctors working in rural areas.

WICHITA (Kan.) EAGLE, Oct. 4 - Donald Beggs, who holds a doctorate in educational measurement and statistics from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, has been named president of Wichita State University, according to a story. Beggs most recently was chancellor at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale.
http://www.wichitaeagle.com/news/local/learning/wsuprez-beggs1004.htm

THE PLAIN DEALER (Cleveland), Oct. 4 - A profile of fiction writer Steve Lattimore noted that he attended the "prestigious two year IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP" at the UI. "The program at Iowa was great," Lattimore is quoted as saying. "The don't really 'teach' writing; they just foster an atmosphere in which you can figure out the process of writing for yourself."

WALL STREET JOURNAL, Oct. 2 - The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's endowment was one of several endowments of U.S. colleges and universities affected by the collapse of the hedge-fund operator Everest Capital Ltd., according to a story. Others included Yale, Brown and Emory.

THE TIMES-PICAYUNE (New Orleans), Oct. 2 - An international study led by KENNETH SAAG, UI College of Medicine, found that those who treat chronic health problems with steroids can reduce their high risk of osteoporosis and broken bones by taking a drug called alendronate. The drug "significantly increases bone mineral density," the study found, which is important in reducing risk of a fractured hip or spine.

NEW YORK TIMES, Oct. 2 - HANCHER AUDITORIUM was included as a stop for the Houston Ballet's production of "Dracula" in the Times' "National Datebook" listing.

MIDLANDS BUSINESS JOURNAL, Oct. 1 - Dr. HAROLD P. ADAMS, professor of neurology, was quoted in a story reporting the use of the imaging technique positron emission tomography, or PET, scanning to determine the risk for stroke faced by people who have low blood flow. Adams wrote an editorial to accompany the study, which was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The story originally appeared in the PITTSBURGH POST-GAZETTE.

THE WILSON QUARTERLY, October 1998 - MARILYNNE ROBINSON, a professor in the UI Writers' Workshop, publishes a piece bemoaning the loss of wilderness in our increasingly industrialized society.

ASTRONOMY, October - The work of LOUIS FRANK, professor of physics and astronomy, and the controversy surrounding his theory that Earth is being bombarded by hundreds of small comets a day was the subject of a cover story.

ABA JOURNAL, October - RANDALL BEZANSON, professor of law, was quoted in a story analyzing three recent court decisions dealing with the First Amendment.

WRITER'S DIGEST, October - VENISE BERRY, associate professor of journalism and mass communication, published an article on the similarities between writing a screenplay and writing a popular novel.

NURSING MANAGEMENT, October - A brief item notes that the UI COLLEGE OF NURSING has won a $2.4-million grant from the National Institutes of Health to continue developing a standardized language to describe patient outcomes resulting from nursing care.

U MAGAZINE, Fall 1998 - Brandon Long, identified as UI sophomore, published a letter to the editor, taking exception to a story on the merits of golf.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The University of Iowa All rights reserved copyright 2006