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CONTACT: PETER ALEXANDER
100 Old Public Library
Iowa City IA 52242
(319) 384-0072; fax (319) 384-0024
e-mail: peter-alexander@uiowa.edu

Release: Immediate

UI CAMPUS NOTES -- IOWA CENTER FOR THE ARTS

IWP AND WRITERS' WORKSHOP READINGS SERIES OCT. 11 -- The University of Iowa International Writing Program (IWP) and the Iowa Writers' Workshop will present a joint reading by Palestinian novelist Mahmoud Shuqair and poet Robyn Schiff at 5 p.m. Sunday, Oct.11 in the Prairie Lights Bookstore at 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City. The reading is free and open to the public.

A prolific writer, Shuqair has published numerous books of fiction for adults and children, including, most recently, the short story collections "Qalat Marian, Qalalfata" and "Oghniet Al Mahar." In 1990 he received a prize from the Association of Jordanian Writers. He is currently working on a novel and an autobiography.

Schiff is a second-year graduate student in the Writers' Workshop at the UI.

The IWP is a unique residency program, which each fall assembles a community of established writers from all parts of the globe. This fall 19 writers from 18 countries will spend three months at the UI.

(NOTE TO BROADCASTERS: Mahmoud Shuqair is pronounced /mach MOOD/ /shoo KAIR/.)

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EDWIDGE DANTICAT READS AT PRAIRIE LIGHTS OCT. 12 -- Novelist Edwidge Danticat will read from her new book "The Farming of Bones" at 8 p.m. Monday, Oct. 12 at Prairie Lights Books, 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City. The reading is free and open to the public.

Publishers Weekly calls Danticat's new novel "Sensuously atmospheric . . . perfectly paced . . . lushly poetic and erotic . . . and starkly realistic."

Danticat, who was born in Haiti and came to the U.S. when she was 12, is the author of "Breath, Eyes, Memory" and "Krik? Krak!," which was nominated for the National Book Award. Granta named her one of the 20 "Best Young American Novelists" in 1996.

The reading will be broadcast on radio stations WSUI AM 910 and WOI AM 640 as part of the "Live from Prairie Lights" series.

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ORR AND MARY DAVIES KELLY READ AT PRAIRIE LIGHTS OCT. 13 -- Writers Orr and Mary Davies Kelly will read from their new book "Dream's End" at 8 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 13 at Prairie Lights Books, 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City. The reading is free and open to the public.

"Dream's End" traces a soldier's experiences from his enlistment in Appanoose County, Iowa, through the Vicksburg and Arkansas campaigns of the Civil War.

"'Dream's End' is one of the best accounts ever written on Union military operations west of the Mississippi," historian Gregory J.W. Urwin of the University of Central Arkansas writes. Library Journal says, "This spellbinding narrative . . . paint[s] a clear picture of a civil war soldier's life."

Mary Kelly has written extensively in genealogy, and Orr, a former Washington reporter, has written five previous books on military history.

The reading will be broadcast live on radio stations WSUI AM 910 and WOI AM 640 as part of the "Live from Prairie Lights" series.

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PERSPECTIVES OCT. 14 -- Allen Roberts, University of Iowa professor of art, and Victoria Rovine, UI Museum of Art curator of the arts of Africa, Oceania and the Americas, will jointly present a gallery talk on the UI Museum of Art's exhibition "Monumentality in Miniature" at 12:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 14 in the museum.

This presentation, which is part of the museum's weekly Perspectives series, will be open to the public free of charge.

The exhibition "Monumentality in Miniature" presents African artworks that have in common only their small size -- all of the objects are less than nine inches in height. The exhibition contains a broad range of objects from the museum's permanent collection including sculptures, whistles, gold weights, jewelry and currency.

These small objects were often made to be worn, carried or concealed. Miniature versions of masks and figurines were created to partake in the power of larger, corresponding objects and were many times crafted from precious materials that had been finely worked to create dramatic impact.

Rovine says, "Clearly the diminutive size of these objects is no indication of their visual importance or aesthetic power. In our gallery talk, Dr. Roberts and I hope to give museum patrons a sense of the cultural context out of which these objects emerged, providing another way to appreciate their immense power and beauty."

The UI Museum of Art, located on North Riverside Drive in Iowa City, is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. the day of the Perspectives program. Admission is free. Public metered parking is available in UI parking lots across from the museum on Riverside Drive, and adjacent to the UI Alumni Center, which is just north of the museum.

M.C. Ginsberg Objects of Art, Inc. of Iowa City is the corporate sponsor for the 1998-99 Perspectives series at the UI Museum of Art, through the University of Iowa Foundation.

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CHAMBER ORCHESTRA CONCERT OCT. 15 -- The Chamber Orchestra from the University of Iowa School of Music will present a free concert of 19th-century music at 2 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 15 in Clapp Recital Hall on the UI campus.

Four works will be featured on the program, which will be conducted by two graduate students in the School of Music. Beverly Everett will conduct Beethoven's Overture to "Coriolan" and the Petite Symphony for winds by Charles Gounod.

Sergio Espinosa will conduct "Crisantemi," a string orchestra arrangement of a very early string quartet by Giacomo Puccini, and "Siegfried Idyll" for chamber orchestra by Richard Wagner.

A training ensemble for both players and student conductors, the chamber orchestra is offered as a class in the UI School of Music. Several times each year the group prepares and presents a public concert in Clapp Recital Hall during its regular meeting time on Thursday afternoon.

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SECOND ART OF THE MONTH SESSION OCT. 17 -- University of Iowa graduate student Lee Anne Gilbertson will give a lecture on the work of artist Weldon Kees at 10 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 17 in the UI Museum of Art.

Gilbertson's lecture, which is free and open to the public, is the second of four sessions in the museum's current Art of the Month mini-course, "Modern Art in America 1920-1970." This series of talks will use works from current exhibitions in the museum and works from the museum's permanent collection to explore movements within 20th-century American art. Art of the Month has been coordinated by Gwen Robertson and Missy Gaido Allen, doctoral students in the UI School of Art and Art History.

Remaining sessions will be Saturdays, Nov. 21 and Dec. 12. New participants are welcome at each Art of the Month session.

Gilbertson's talk will examine Kees' multifaceted production with particular reference to his music and literary works. Kees first achieved celebrity in the early 1940s as a poet, but by mid-century he began to paint, make collages, compose cabaret music and experiment with film-making. He attracted considerable attention in the art world and had his artwork shown in New York along with that of notable abstract impressionists including William de Kooning and Robert Motherwell.

Kees became art critic for the Nation, producing some of the most lucid and admired criticism of the time, but following his sudden disappearance and presumed death in 1955, his reputation as an artist faded.

Gilbertson says of him, "Kees was an extremely important interdisciplinary artist of his time. As a painter, critic, poet and musician, he was able to negotiate the possibilities of various art forms, giving a new sense of what an artist could be at the mid-century."

The UI Museum of Art, located on North Riverside Drive in Iowa City, is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday. Admission is free. Public metered parking is available in UI parking lots across from the museum on Riverside Drive, and adjacent to the UI Alumni Center, which is just north of the museum.

10/2/98