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UI in the News

November, 1998

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UNIVERSITY BUSINESS, November/December 1998 - An article notes that the UI has cut down on computer lab congestion by supplying quick-stop kiosks in the student union that allow students to check their email. DAVID GRADY, director of university life centers, says the students are using the kiosks extensively. "They're here at 7 a.m. when I come in, and at times there's a line." VIRGINIA DRAKE, an ITS computer consultant says there are plans to use phased-out computers for additional stations in the residence halls.

NEWSDAY, Nov. 30 - An article about the use of cochlear implants in children notes that some opponents cite a University of Iowa study as evidence that the implants are not beneficial. In the study, young implant users were read a series of words. They recognized between 12 and 32 percent. But RICHARD TYLER, a UI professor of otolaryngology who helped conduct the study, said those children from the study have improved with age. "This is not a magic pill, and they won't make a deaf child a normal hearing child," he said. "But can some children have relatively normal speech, and interact with hearing peers, be in school with minimal assistance and improve their chances in a hearing world? Absolutely."
http://library.newsday.com/getdoc.cgi?id=118449218x0y26747&OIDS=1Q001D000&Form=RL&bp=

THE NEW REPUBLIC, Nov. 30 - An article about the Jackson Pollock exhibition at New York's Museum of Modern Art notes that visitors who know Pollock's work may be struck by Pollock's early works, including "Mural," which "seldom leaves the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA MUSEUM OF ART."

CHARLOTTE (N.C.) OBSERVER, Nov. 30 - A book review discusses the three-decade research path that led to UI professor of history LINDA KERBER's new book, "No Constitutional Right To Be Ladies: Women and the Obligations of Citizenship." The reviewer notes, "Kerber's research is meticulous and she is fascinated by the country's founding fathers and mothersThe majority view was that the system did not oppress women - it protected them and awarded them privilege. That system created a tension that threads through the history of the struggle for women's equality. Kerber finds it at numerous junctures, wherever women bump against an unsettled question of civic duty." This article originally appeared in the BOSTON GLOBE Nov. 6.

THE (Nashville) TENNESSEAN, Nov. 29 - Nationwide efforts to dismantle or limit affirmative action programs have prompted fierce debate. KEVIN LEICHT, a UI professor of sociology, said, "We have to come up with a solution that middle-class America will support. If white people do nothing, that will derail it. There seems to be a consensus that something must be done. But the means are as important as the end result."

LOS ANGELES TIMES, Nov. 29 - The newspaper carries a review of "Friendly Fire" by Kathryn Chetkovich, published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS.

WASHINGTON POST, Nov. 29 - An article about fiction writer John Edgar Wideman notes that he attended the UI WRITERS' WORKSHOP.
http://search.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/WPlate/1998-11/29/028l-112998-idx.html

NEWSDAY, Nov. 29 - A review of UI American studies professor RICHARD HORWITZ's new book, "Hog Ties: Pigs, Manure, and Mortality in American Culture," says, "the chief virtue of 'Hog Ties' is evenhandedness. Horwitz goes to great lengths to present the issues surrounding 'the hog wars' in all their complexity. He treats the animal rights lobby with respect but also gets at the conundrum inherent in their position: No one can know what hogs want."
http://library.newsday.com/getdoc.cgi?id=118449114x0y26597&OIDS=1Q001D013&Form=RL&bp=no

DETROIT FREE PRESS, Nov. 29 - An article about the Urban Institute for Contemporary Arts in Grand Rapids, Mich., quotes UI law professor SANDY BOYD as " a University of Iowa professor and art expert." He says the institute, "is on the cutting edge by combining both performance and visual arts. It's impressive ... not only in terms of the community, but also in terms of the forward vision. Most contemporary venues focus on one or the other, not both."
http://www.freep.com/news/mich/qart29.htm

FRESNO (Calif.) BEE, Nov. 28 - In a medical question/answer column on the topic of constipation in toddlers, the doctor answering the question cites an editorial by VERA LOENING-BAUCKE, a UI professor of pediatrics. She agreed that an Italian study suggesting that an allergy to cow's milk may play a role in childhood constipation was intriguing and deserved further study. Based on the initial report, she said, parents should try eliminating cow's milk if their children have problems with constipation.

NEWSDAY, Nov. 27 - New newspapers in China are drawing readers away from "The People's Daily," which was once the only newspaper available and was the official mouthpiece of the Communist government. Although the new upstart papers are all owned by units of the Communist Party, they are increasingly operating freely and publishing stories about official corruption. JUDY POLUMBAUM, a UI associate professor of journalism, is quoted as a specialist in Chinese media. She says, "The one area that's really off-limits to `real' reporting is politics--domestic and foreign policy."
http://library.newsday.com/getdoc.cgi?id=118449218x0y26747&OIDS=1Q001D002&Form=RL&bp=

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Nov. 27 - An article about new Ph.D. programs in women's studies notes that the UI is one of only six institutions to offer the degree and one of three that began offering it this academic year. Basic facts about the program are listed in a chart.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v45/i14/14a01001.htm (password needed)

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Nov. 27 - An opinion piece by Leonard Cassuto, an associate professor of English at Fordham University, bemoans the increasing "professionalization" of graduate studies. Graduate students are focused on publishing because it may help them in the highly competitive job market. However, the author notes, most jobs are found in smaller colleges where teaching is emphasized over research. He praises the UI ENGLISH DEPARTMENT for preparing its graduate students "to apply for jobs at smaller colleges and universities, where teaching writing is more important than publishing research."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v45/i14/14a01001.htmhttp:14a01001.htm (password needed)

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Nov. 27 - An item in the "Hot Type" publishing column notes that the University of Chicago Press has paid DEIRDRE MCCLOSKEY, UI economics professor, a $20,000 advance for her autobiography, currently titled "Crossing: A Memoir." The second item in the column notes that the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS has just published a book of poetry written by doctors, "Blood and Bone: Poems by Physicians."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v45/i14/14a01901.htm (password needed)

FARM AND DAIRY, Nov. 26 - UNIVERSITY OF IOWA research shows that at least one in six athletes representing the U.S. at the 1996 Olympic Games had a history of asthma.

MULTIPLE NEWS OUTLETS, NOV. 24 - HAYDEN FRY's retirement from his position as UI football coach was announced in the CHICAGO TRIBUNE and KANSAS CITY STAR and on both REUTERS and ASSOCIATED PRESS news wires. The Associated Press story about Fry's announcement ran in the FORT WORTH (Texas) STAR-TELEGRAM, WASHINGTON POST, NEW YORK TIMES, LOS ANGELES TIMES, BOSTON GLOBE, USA TODAY, PHILADELPHIA DAILY NEWS, COLUMBUS DISPATCH, CLEVELAND PLAIN DEALER, SPOKANE SPOKESMAN-REVIEW, MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE, MEMPHIS COMMERCIAL-APPEAL, WICHITA EAGLE, THE SPORTING NEWS, CNN/SI, MSNBC.COM, FOXSPORTS.COM and CBS SPORTSLINE.COM.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/splash/article/0,1051,SAV-9811240067,00.html

NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW, Nov. 22 - A review of "The Hours" by Michael Cunningham, a graduate of the UI WRITERS' WORKSHOP, notes the "eerie consequences" of the book's similarities to "Mrs. Dalloway," by Virginia Woolf.

THE OTTAWA (Ontario) CITIZEN, Nov. 22 - A column listing "interesting but obscure new books" includes a paragraph about "Ladie Borlase's Recipts Booke, by DAVID SCHOONOVER, UI Libraries Curator of Rare Books. His book, published by the UI PRESS, is based on material from the UI's Szathmary Collection, "one of the world's greatest collections of books and manuscripts about cookery," the article notes.

PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, Nov. 22 - In a review of the Victorian Fairy Paintings exhibit, currently on display at the Frick Collection in New York City, the writer notes, "Oddly enough, this exhibition didn't germinate in Britain but at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA MUSEUM OF ART. PAMELA WHITE TRIMPE, the museum's assistant director and curator of paintings and sculpture, hatched the project, and subsequently brought in the Royal Academy of Arts in London as a collaborator." The Frick version of the show is significantly smaller than the one mounted in Iowa City and London, the review says, because the Frick doesn't have much room for special attractions.
http://www.phillynews.com/inquirer/98/Nov/22/arts_and_entertainment/FAIR22.htm

THE ECONOMIST, Nov. 21 - The Makah tribe in the Pacific Northwest recently won the right to resurrect an ancient tradition of having a whale hunt as a male rite of passage. But battles with those opposed to killing whales as well as internal squabbles between different clans within the tribe have caused so much distraction that no serious effort to kill a whale has yet been made. LAWRENCE ZIMMERMAN, the director of the UI American Indian and Native Studies program says this is no surprise. It is not uncommon, he says, for Indian tribes to resurrect old customs and find a hose of complications they had not forseen.

NEW YORK TIMES, Nov. 21 - A review of a UI CENTER FOR NEW MUSIC concert, Tuesday, Nov. 17 at New York's Merkin Concert Hall, states: "An ensemble of faculty members and graduate students from the University of Iowa performed strongly on Tuesday night in a program of miscellaneous American pieces from the last decade. "The review observed that DAVID GOMPPER, director of the Center for New Music, was "responsible for the concert's clarity and directness." Also mentioned by name were oboist MARK WEIGER of the School of Music faculty, cited for his "mellifluous playing" in Bernard Rand's Concertino for Oboe and Ensemble; and doctoral student ANDREW CARLSON, described as "a demon fiddler," who was soloist in Gompper's "Finnegan's Wake."

CNN.COM, Nov. 20 - CNN's book page includes the first chapter of James Carville's "And The Horse He Rode In On," about Ken Starr and the Whitewater investigation. Among the many abuses Carville outlines is the allegation, repeated over and over in the media, that $50,000 of the bad $300,000 loan was used to help the Whitewater investment. Carville notes that GILBERT CRANBERG, UI professor of journalism, wrote an article for "Nieman Reports" that showed how the tale of the $50,000 is a "key element" of Whitewater "that's been written about carelessly, or incompletely, or just plain falsely."
http://www.cnn.com/books/beginnings/9811/carville/

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Nov. 20 - Northfield Laboratories has taken over as the front runner in the drive to produce an oxygen-carrying blood substitute. This follows the decision by Baxter International, Inc. to end human trials and then pull the plug completely on its substitute, HemAssist. But the demand for a substitute is easing as fears about a tainted blood supply have diminished. "There were obviously tremendous concerns in the 1980s, concerns with HIV, but the fact that the blood supply is safe today doesn't mean there won't ever be another crisis," said JOSEPH WALDER, the UI adjunct professor of biochemistry who invented the solution that Baxter developed as HemAssist. The article notes that the UI "stood to reap millions of dollars in royalties had Baxter's product gone to market."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/splash/article/0,1051,SAV-9811200168,00.html

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Nov. 20 - An article about novelist and poet Benjamin Alire Saenz, who teaches in the bilingual creative writing program at the University of Texas-El Paso, notes that he attended the UI WRITERS' WORKSHOP. http://chronicle.com/weekly/v45/i13/13a00901.htm (password needed)

WASHINGTON POST, Nov. 19 - An article about Aboubakar Sanogo, a visiting fellow at the National Museum of African Art charged with organizing the museum's current film series, "Great African Films of the '90s," notes that he was a visiting fellow in the UI film program a year ago.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/WPlate/1998-11/19/213l-111998-idx.html

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Nov. 19 - A story about why federal regulators halted human research studies at Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center in Chicago says that HAROLD ADAMS, UI professor of neurology, is the national trial leader of one of the studies that was stopped. Adams said his study involved the anti-clotting drug orgaran, which is meant to prevent a second stroke, but that he and his team had decided to limit participants in the study to those whose first strokes were not severe. The National Institutes of Health alleged that Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's had enrolled patients in the study who have suffered severe first strokes.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/splash/article/0,1051,SAV-9811190090,00.html

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Nov. 19 - A list of 1998 National Book Award winners includes GERALD STERN, emeritus professor in the UI WRITERS' WORKSHOP, who won in poetry for "This Time: New and Selected Poems," published by W.W. Norton. (The award announcement does not include his UI affiliation.) This news is also reported Nov. 19 in the WASHINGTON POST, LOS ANGELES TIMES, CHICAGO TRIBUNE, NEWSDAY, and PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER.
http://chronicle.com/daily/98/11/98111903n.htm (password needed)
http://www.phillynews.com:80/inquirer/98/Nov/19/national/NBA19.htm (no password needed)

THE (Portland) OREGONIAN, Nov. 19 - The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA INSTITUTE OF HYDRAULIC RESEARCH performs some of the world's premier research on dams and is working on a project to see how dams and turbines affect baby salmon. A brief item notes that this research will contribute to the welfare of Columbia River salmon in Oregon.

THE SALT LAKE TRIBUNE, Nov. 18 - A study by ROBERT FORSYTHE, senior associate dean at the UI College of Business, found that concerns about online stock fraud appear to be grounded in truth. Online sellers tend to hype their investments and gullible buyers pay more than they should. "These chat rooms should be a matter of concern. People do seem to be taken in by what they hear," Forsythe said. This article originally appeared in the WALL STREET JOURNAL (Nov. 18).

LOS ANGELES TIMES, Nov. 18 - A profile of ETHAN CANIN, a professor in the UI Writers' Workshop, says that he seems more excited about his new position as a tenured professor in the Workshop than he is about his new book, which is getting rave reviews. "It's the best job in the country, the best students," he said. "It's the center of the country for writers."

WALL STREET JOURNAL, Nov. 18 - A study by ROBERT FORSYTHE, senior associate dean at the UI College of Business, and THOMAS RIETZ, UI professor of finance, found that concerns about online stock fraud appear to be grounded in truth. The professors found that online sellers tend to hype their investments and gullible buyers pay more than they should. "These chat rooms should be a matter of concern. People do seem to be taken in by what they hear," Forsythe said. Rietz added, "Anybody can say anything they want, and it's completely anonymous."
http://interactive.wsj.com/documents/search.htm (online subscription required)

NEWSDAY, Nov. 18 - An article about the enduring appeal of the Nancy Drew mystery series credits Mildred Wirt Bensen as the first "Carolyn Keene," the pen name under which all the books were published. Bensen earned a master's in Journalism in 1927 at the UI, the first woman to do so, the article notes. Bensen did not become widely known as the Nancy Drew ghostwriter until a 1993 Nancy Drew Conference at the UI, organized by CAROLYN DYER, UI professor of journalism.

FOX NEWS, Nov. 17 - An article from Reuters says chronic orthostatic intolerance (a disease whose symptoms include rapid heartbeat, dizziness, and sometimes fainting) appears to be a disorder of the central nervous system, according to findings published in the Nov. 16 issue of "Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association." In the same journal, KRZYSZTOF NARKIEWICZ, UI internal medicine fellow and VIREND K. SOMERS, associate professor of internal medicine, write in an editorial that the disease "may constitute part of a spectrum of disorders" that includes fainting and chronic fatigue syndrome. They call for "improvements in diagnostic skills and technologies, standardization of diagnostic criteria and nomenclature and heightened physician sensitivity to these disorders." http://www.foxnews.com:80/js_index.sml?content=/health/111798/dizzy.sml

ST. PAUL PIONEER PRESS, Nov. 17 - In an article about parents' concerns about "integrated math" being used in middle schools and high schools for the first time this year, HAROLD SCHOEN, a UI professor of curriculum and instruction, says that integrated math improves students' problem solving skills but that students may need more practice to solve paper-and-pencil problems quickly.

THE AUTOCHANNEL.COM, Nov. 17 - An article announces a new partnership between the UI and Mechanical Dynamics Inc. in which technology developed at the UI CENTER FOR COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN will be integrated with Mechanical Dynamics' virtual prototyping software. The CCAD technology allows engineers and designers to study how design revisions will impact the redesigned part's durability.
http://www.theautochannel.com:80/news/press/date/19981116/press000585.html

OMAHA WORLD-HERALD, Nov. 17 - A support group for families of farm accident victims is being developed under the direction of Iowa's CENTER FOR AGRICULTURE SAFETY AND HEALTH at the UI. KENDALL THU, of the UI department of preventive medicine, said the group is different from most of the center's efforts, which are largely safety- and health-related. "In this case there was clearly a need for a post-event follow-up and support."

NURSEWEEK, Nov. 16 - A new study from the UI COLLEGE OF PHARMACY shows that 90 percent of physicians surveyed underestimated the cost of common brand name medications. "They were off by as much as $70," said MICHAEL ERNST, an assistant clinical professor who led the study.

CHARLOTTE (N.C.) OBSERVER, Nov. 16 - More and more private sector companies are following the lead of universities and many newspapers in hiring ombudsmen to mediate internal disputes. But in a recent case, a judge ordered a company to turn over its ombudsman's records after an employee sued for age discrimination. JOHN DELANEY, UI professor of management, is quoted as saying that this case undermines the role of the ombudsman's office and that companies will be taking a second look at the value of the office if they can't guarantee confidentiality. This article originally appeared in the HOUSTON CHRONICLE.
http://www.charlotte.com/jobhunter/jobnews/pub/000325.htm

LOS ANGELES TIMES, Nov. 16 - An Associated Press article profiling Democratic leaders in Congress notes that the House minority whip, David Bonoir, attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA on an athletics scholarship.

SAN DIEGO UNION TRIBUNE, Nov. 15 - A profile of fiction writer Lan Samantha Chang notes that she earned an MFA from "the prestigious writing program at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA."

SMALL BUSINESS NEWS-WASHINGTON, Nov. 15 - Small businesses can profit from going public by joining with other small companies in a given industry to form an entity large enough for an IPO. But TIMOTHY LOUGHRAN, a UI associate professor of finance, says this may be riskier than small businesses realize. He has studied the profitability of such public offerings and found that they generally underperform the stock market. This article also appeared in SMALL BUSINESS NEWS-AKRON (Nov. 15).

ADVANCE FOR HEALTH INFORMATION EXECUTIVES, Nov. 15 - In an article about pharmacy information systems, STEVEN NELSON, associate director of the pharmaceutical care department at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS, said he needed a system that addressed patient safety as well as cost management issues. He also wanted a system that could provide clinicians with information about drugs and drug combinations. "Safety, cost, clinical practice, and automation are key issues that I regularly face," Nelson said.

TRAINING MAGAZINE, Nov. 15 - An article about Maytag Corp. efforts to develop homegrown talent notes that one problem it had was that the nearest M.B.A. program was 100 miles away at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.

PHYSICIANS AND COMPUTERS, Nov. 15 - An article about the ways in which technology is increasing access to information mentions the UI's VIRTUAL HOSPITAL, http://www.indy.radiology.uiowa.edu

PALM BEACH POST, Nov. 15 - An Associated Press article says that a state Supreme Court ruling in Louisiana restricts the types of cases law students running legal clinics for the poor can undertake. The ruling came after the Tulane University Environmental Law Clinic won a big case against a business that wanted to build a plastics plant in a mostly-black neighborhood. The article notes that student lawyers have been running clinics and representing the poor for years and have won some big victories along the way. For example, in 1981, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student lawyers won lawsuits over prison conditions. The article also appeared in the BERGEN (N.J.) RECORD (Nov. 13), MIAMI HERALD (Nov. 13) CHICAGO TRIBUNE (Nov. 13), WALL STREET JOURNAL (Oct. 29), LOS ANGELES TIMES (Nov. 12) and on CNN INTERACTIVE (Nov. 13).
http://www.chicagotribune.com/splash/article/0,1051,SAV-9811130131,00.html

INSTYLE, Nov. 15 - In a Q&A column, ROGER CEILLEY, a UI assistant professor of dermatology, offers advice on how to find a good dermatologist. "First, check with your friends or your family physician," he said. He also suggests contacting the American Academy of Dermatology.

WALL STREET JOURNAL, Nov. 13 - In a story about what happens to a small town when a school closes or school districts consolidate, UI education professor GEORGE CHAMBERS says, "The greatest loss is a high school." A high school is usually the geographic, social and political center of town, he says, and when it closes, "the focal point shifts" -- to another town.
http://interactive.wsj.com/articles/SB910848017214180500.htm (online subscription required)

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Nov. 13 - A story about the fledgling debate program in selected Chicago public schools noted that the student debaters were invited to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA last summer to participate in "rigorous debate camps."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/splash/article/0,1051,SAV-9811130179,00.html

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Nov. 13 - An Associated Press article says that a state Supreme Court ruling in Louisiana restricts the types of cases law students running legal clinics for the poor can undertake. The ruling came after the Tulane University Environmental Law Clinic won a big case against a business that wanted to build a plastics plant in a mostly-black neighborhood. The article notes that student lawyers have been running clinics and representing the poor for years and have won some big victories along the way. For example, in 1981, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student lawyers won lawsuits over prison conditions. The article also appeared in the BERGEN (N.J.) RECORD (Nov. 13), MIAMI HERALD (Nov. 13), WALL STREET JOURNAL (Oct. 29), LOS ANGELES TIMES (Nov. 12) and on CNN INTERACTIVE (Nov. 13).
http://www.chicagotribune.com/splash/article/0,1051,SAV-9811130131,00.html

BOTTOM LINE HEALTH, November - A round-up of recent research that has found health risks related to milk consumption includes a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study, published in the journal PEDIATRICS, which showed that milk can cause anemia by interfering with iron absorption and/or by triggering internal bleeding.

BOTTOM LINE HEALTH, November - A brief item cites research by JAMES R. CERHAN, UI assistant professor of preventive medicine, which found that risk for prostate cancer quadruples if a man's brother has had the disease. Risk increases 2.3 times if his father has had prostate cancer, and having a mother or sister with breast or ovarian cancer raises a man's prostate cancer risk 1.7 times.

DETROIT NEWS, Nov. 12 - In an article about the international effort, led by NASA, to build a space station, JAMES VAN ALLEN, UI professor of physics and astronomy, is quoted as a critic of the project. "In my view, the estimated cost of completing the station is vastly greater than any potential I can visualize either for science or for any practical application," he said.
http://detnews.com:80/1998/nation/9811/12/11120193.htm

USA TODAY, Nov. 10 - At a meeting of the American Heart Association, DIANNE ATKINS, UI associate professor of pediatrics, discussed differing opinions about whether children on antidepressant and antihyperactive drugs should be monitored with frequent electrocardiograms. In general psychiatrists have pushed for very close monitoring in case of heart problems while pediatricians have said there is little or no need for monitoring, Atkins said. The AHA's new statement says that while some monitoring is appropriate, the group "did not think it was necessary that children be tested once a week or once every several weeks," Atkins said. An Associated Press articles on this topic quoting Atkins appeared in the LOS ANGELES TIMES, SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH, SAN DIEGO UNION-TRIBUNE, DENVER POST, ROCKY MOUNTAIN NEWS (Denver), PITTSBURGH POST-GAZETTE, GRAND RAPIDS (Mich.) PRESS, THE (Louisville, Ky.) COURIER-JOURNAL, FORT WORTH (Tex.) STAR-TELEGRAM, THE (Hackensack, N.J.) RECORD, SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNE, THE (Toledo, Ohio) BLADE, THE (Cleveland) PLAIN DEALER, and THE (Worcester, Mass.) TELEGRAM & GAZETTE.

MIAMI HERALD, Nov. 10 - A story about the University of Miami football team's first game against an integrated team said it was the 1950 Orange Bowl game versus the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "For stiffly segregated Florida, it was a precedent setting event" to play against a UI team with African-American players, the article said.

NEW YORK TIMES, Nov. 10 - An article about ETHAN CANIN, a professor in the UI Writers' Workshop, says that like the characters in his latest novel, Canin chose the risky path over the safe one. He said he doesn't regret leaving medicine for writing, but admitted some feelings of insecurity. "I was leaving the most secure job in the world for the least secure, leaving a job I knew I could do for a job I still to this day have no idea whether I can do," he said. "I remember the morning of walking out of the hospital and into this shining day and just feeling this flood of relief."

WALL STREET JOURNAL, Nov. 9 - At a meeting of the American Heart Association, DIANNE ATKINS, UI associate professor of pediatrics, discussed differing opinions about whether children on antidepressant and antihyperactive drugs should be monitored with frequent electrocardiograms. In general psychiatrists have pushed for very close monitoring in case of heart problems while pediatricians have said there is little or no need for monitoring, Atkins said. The AHA's new statement says that while some monitoring is appropriate, the group "did not think it was necessary that children be tested once a week or once every several weeks," Atkins said. Atkins was also quoted in Associated Press http://www2.nando.net:80/newsroom/ntn/health/110998/health12_29666_noframes.html and Reuters http://www.infoseek.com/Content?arn=a2819LBY447reulb-19981109&qt=%22University+of+Iowa%22&sv=IS&lk=noframes&col=NX&kt=A&ak=news1486 articles on the same topic. The Associated Press article also ran in the LOS ANGELES TIMES. The SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS also included this story in a column of medical notes.

COLUMBUS DISPATCH, Nov. 8 - An article about NCAA penalties imposed on the University of Cincinnati basketball program quotes UI professor of sport, health, leisure, and physical studies BONNIE SLATTON, who is acting chair of the NCAA Committee on Infractions. She said her committee would have imposed even more restrictions if the university had not responded first with self-imposed penalties.

SMARTMONEY, Nov. 15 - The monthly magazine, which was published before the Nov. 3 elections, analyzed the relative effects that the economy and the Clinton/Lewinsky scandal would have on the outcome. The article included a prediction by UI political science professor MICHAEL LEWIS-BECK that the Republicans would gain six seats in the House of Representatives. The magazine suggested this might be understating the eventual outcome.

AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN, Nov. 8 - A health and fitness column discusses a new video about childhood stuttering and notes that one of the experts appearing in the video is PATRICIA ZEBROWSKI, UI associate professor of speech pathology and audiology.
http://www.austin360.com:80/health/stories/11nov/08/fitnotes.htm

NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW, Nov. 8 - In a review of a new book of short stories by T.C. BOYLE, an alumnus of the UI Writers' Workshop, the reviewer notes that "the fact that I've just negotiated almost 700 pages of T.C. Boyle's short fictionand I'm not sick to death of it attests to its overall inventiveness, flash and just plain entertainment value."

NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW, Nov. 8 - A brief item about the new four-volume collection of poetry by RAYMOND CARVER, an alumnus of the UI Writers' Workshop, notes that the poems "capture in verse much of the same pared narrative power that distinguishes his fiction."

NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW, Nov. 8 - A brief item reviews "The Higher Jazz" by Edmund Wilson, published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS.

BOSTON GLOBE, Nov. 6 - A book review discusses the three-decade research path that led to UI professor of history LINDA KERBER's new book, "No Constitutional Right To Be Ladies." The reviewer notes, "Kerber's research is meticulous and she is fascinated by the country's founding fathers and mothersThe majority view was that the system did not oppress women ­ it protected them and awarded them privilege. That system created a tension that threads through the history of the struggle for women's equality. Kerber finds it at numerous junctures, wherever women bump against an unsettled question of civic duty."

TIME, Nov. 9 - The magazine's coverage of the Jackson Pollack retrospective on display currently at New York's Museum of Modern Art includes a photo of his painting, "Mural," which is owned by the UI MUSEUM OF ART.

THE CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Nov. 6 - A series of three articles examining the question "When Alcohol Kills, Who Is Responsible?" includes an article about the legal questions in the case of Matthew Garafalo, the UI student who died after a night of heavy drinking in 1995. The article quotes UI President MARY SUE COLEMAN, Dean of Students PHILLIP JONES, and UI sophomore TIMOTHY LEWIS, the Delta Sigma Phi member who currently lives in Garafalo's former room in the fraternity house.
http://chronicle.com/free/v45/i11/11a00101.htm

THE CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Nov. 6 - An article about a sexual harassment case against the women's soccer coach at the University of North Carolina ­ Chapel Hill quotes CHRISTINE GRANT, UI women's athletics director, saying that there are some gray areas in coach-player interactions that make it difficult to insure proper relationships. For example, she says, coaches tend to put their arms around players to console them after a bad play. "It's almost second nature for a coach to pat someone on the back," Grant said. "Coaches right now are struggling with how to behave, when the behavior is innocent and well-meaning. They're having to unlearn gestures that could be misinterpreted."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v45/i11/11a06301.htm (password needed)

NEW YORK TIMES, Nov. 4 - A review of a gala celebration of the Lar Lubovitch Dance Company's 30th anniversary notes that Lubovitch attended the UI. "A 1961 film of Lubovitch as a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA showed the first solo he choreographed already strong on structure and form" the reviewer wrote.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Nov. 3 - A sports article sensitively treats the subject of UI quarterback RANDY REINERS' struggling season following the death of his sister just before the football season began.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/splash/article/0,1051,SAV-9811030015,00.html

THE HUNTSVILLE (Ala.) TIMES, Nov. 3 - In an article about a new online endeavor that connects business professionals with experts in the field ­ opportunities once only available by attending national conferences ­ ROBERT FORSYTHE, senior associate dean in the UI College of Business warns that online advice does not always come from credible sources. He said such advice is cheap and easy to find online, but that people should be skeptical of advice they receive from unfamiliar sources.

ARKANSAS DEMOCRAT-GAZETTE, Nov. 3 - An election day article about polling notes that a local television station employs UI graduates Ernie and Zoe Oakleaf, "the current leaders in public opinion analysis in Arkansas," as on-air polling consultants. Both have doctorates from the UI, his in sociology and hers in historical demography.

FORBES MAGAZINE, Nov. 2 - A profile of Kerry Killinger, chairman and chief executive officer of Washington Mutual Inc. of Seattle, noted that he graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA (B.B.A., 1970; M.B.A., 1971). Washington Mutual is the nation's largest savings and loan, with $156 billion in assets, according to the article.
http://www.forbes.com/forbes/98/1102/6210056a.htm

OUTPATIENT CARE REVIEW, November 1998 - An article about the use of digital imaging to share medical information on the Internet notes that the UI's department of dermatology web site (http://tray.dermatology.uiowa.edu/home.html), under the direction of THOMAS L. RAY, professor of dermatology, offers information ranging from clinics to journals to toll-free health hotlines.

NURSING MANAGEMENT, November 1998 - Inpatient care units with higher proportions of care delivered by registered nurses have lower rates of medication errors, patient falls, and other adverse patient outcomes, according to research by MARY BLEGEN, associate professor and associate dean of the UI COLLEGE OF NURSING. Another article on this study appeared in THE AMERICAN NURSE (Oct. 15).

CONTEMPORARY LONG TERM CARE, November 1998 - Communication is the key to avoiding harmful drug combinations in patients who are transferred between long term care facilities and hospitals, said ANGELA KUEHL, a clinical pharmacist for the UI department of preventive medicine. She conducted a study that found that the implementation of a formal information exchange system among ambulatory care, acute care, and long term care settings, enabled pharmacists to intervene and head off crises when conflicting drugs were prescribed.

SMITHSONIAN, November 1998 - An article about the Jackson Pollock exhibit at New York's Museum of Modern Art notes that Peggy Guggenheim commissioned from Pollock a mural for her town house. That painting, "Mural," is now owned by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA MUSEUM OF ART and is the largest work he ever painted.

LINGUA FRANCA, November - An article about the rise of feminist economics features the unique perspective of UI economics professor DEIRDRE MCCLOSKEY, who challenged the male-dominated profession's "decline into pointless theorem proving," in a 1985 book. That book "anticipated many of the arguments now made by feminist economists," the article says and was instrumental in getting the movement off the ground.

GLAMOUR, November - A brief item cites a study by MICHAEL O'HARA, chairman of the UI psychology department, which found that new mothers weren't any more adversely affected by sleep deprivation than women who hadn't just had babies. The study suggests that this is probably because new mothers managed to get as much total sleep as non-mothers by sleeping later or taking naps. However, O'Hara said that new mothers were more likely to report bad moods and that "hormonal shifts probably play a role along with sleep interruptions."

PARENTING MAGAZINE, November - FRANK CONROY, director of the UI Writers' Workshop, published an essay on "The Good Father." "Fatherhood is a constantly changing dynamic, one hour at a time, which in the end calls out everything in him there is to call out. Stretched over decades, it leaves no part of a man untouched. It goes without saying that pain, also, is involved. But that should surprise no one," he wrote.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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