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UI in the News

December, 1998

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AMERICAN VISIONS MAGAZINE, December/January 1999 -- CHRISTOPHER ROY and L. LEE MCINTYRE, directors of the University of Iowa's Art and Life in Africa project, are pictured in the publication. The pair created a CD-ROM that present African art in the context of African life.

NEWSDAY, Dec. 30 - The newspaper's annual future-events quiz for readers includes 24 questions about predicting the events of the coming year. The final question is: "Every four years, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's PRESIDENTIAL FUTURES MARKET tracks presidential campaigns. By the end of 1999, who will be the leading Democratic presidential contender? Who will be the leading Republican presidential candidate?"

TAGES ANZEIGER, Dec. 30 - Switzerland's leading newspaper publishes an article about Emil Zopfi's residency this fall in the UI INTERNATIONAL WRITING PROGRAM.

SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, Dec. 29 - UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers recently found an unusually high rate of respiratory problems among people who lived near a 4,000-sow hog confinement facility. The symptoms were similar to those documented among hog confinement workers over the past two decades in about two dozen studies worldwide. "The change has been with the emergence of these very large facilities," said KENDALL THU, associate director of the UI Center for Agricultural Safety and Health. "The gases and dust that we know exist on the inside are being transferred to the exterior." This story was originally reported Dec. 28 in the OMAHA WORLD-HERALD. It also appeared in the Dec. 29 MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE.

REUTERS HEALTH NEWS, Dec. 29 - UI researchers may have found a way to permanently deliver effective gene therapy to the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis. PAUL MCCRAY, Jr., a UI associate professor of pediatrics and the co-principal investigator in the study, said the key to the recent finding is sending the healthy gene into lung cells using a retrovirus. "A retrovirus has the advantage of permanently placing its gene into the host cell. So when the cells divide they are able to reproduce the gene." These findings are bringing the researchers closer to their ultimate goal - a permanent method of correcting the genetic flaw thought to cause cystic fibrosis.

DETROIT FREE PRESS, Dec. 29 - An article about a legislative effort to create "conduct contracts" that Michigan college students would sign, pledging, among other things, to limit alcohol consumption, notes that binge drinking is a campus problem nationwide. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is listed as one of several campuses where students have died in recent years as a result of excessive drinking.
http://www.freep.com/news/mich/qbinge29.htm

SAN DIEGO UNION-TRIBUNE, Dec. 28 - An article about women who sue their employers for forcing them to wear high-heeled shoes cites UI law professor MARC LINDER as an expert on the legal issues involved. Linder has published an article titled: "Smart Women, Stupid Shoes and Cynical Employers."

SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, Dec. 27 - In his "Year in (Book) Review" column, the newspaper's Book Editor lists as the year's "Most worrisome brain drain" the Bay Area's loss of ETHAN CANIN, who moved to Iowa to join the faculty in the UI Writers' Workshop.

NEW YORK TIMES, Dec. 27 - The Book Review contains a short review of "The River of Lost Voices: Stories from Guatemala," by Mark Brazaitis, published by UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS.

THE ROCHESTER (N.Y.) DEMOCRAT AND CHRONICLE, Dec. 27 -- DAVID BALDUS, a professor at the University of Iowa Law School, is quoted in an article that compares the number of indictments seeking the death penalty in upstate and downstate New York and suggests the capital punishment law may be proved unconstitutional. New York's death law "is the only one that specifically refers to racial proportionality," said Baldus.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Dec. 27 - An article about people who change careers later in life includes as an example KATHRYN CAMPBELL, a former UI English professor, who decided to leave the academic world to become an Episcopal priest. She is now rector at two small churches in Charles City and Clermont, Iowa.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/splash/article/0,1051,SAV-9812270037,00.html

(Portland, Ore.) OREGONIAN, Dec. 26 - Richard Gephardt may be the only person to have gained political stature as a result of the impeachment hearings, an article says. The House Minority Leader kept party defections to a minimum, worked closely with the White House, and made a well-received speech pleading for a halt to morality tests for elected officials. BRUCE GRONBECK, a UI professor of communication studies, said Gephardt might have tapped into a growing public distaste for making political issues out of personal lives. "I think that will be a theme of Campaign 2000," Gronbeck said. "He is already striking that theme, and it is going to run from now until then." This story originally appeared in the Dec. 25 PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER. Versions of this story also appeared Dec. 25 in the MIAMI HERALD and AKRON (Ohio) BEACON JOURNAL.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Dec. 26 - In a sports article about KIRK FERENTZ's preparations to take over as head football coach, UI athletics director BOB BOWLSBY says, although Ferentz was not well known to Iowa fans, he is everything the committee was looking for in a new coach. "More than anything else, that's what we looked for - someone with a very strong connection and an understanding of how much Coach Fry accomplished here," Bowlsby said. "I think he will command the respect and attention of the people in the program and across the state."

KANSAS CITY STAR, Dec. 26 - The newspaper's editorial board compiled a list of "the strangest quotes of 1998" and included the following from LOUIS FRANK, a UI professor of physics and astronomy: "The only thing that changes some scientists' opinion is death."
http://www.kcstar.com:80/item/pages/opinion.pat,opinion/30da9e54.c22,.html

PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, Dec. 25 - Richard Gephardt may be the only person to have gained political stature as a result of the impeachment hearings, an article says. The House Minority Leader kept party defections to a minimum, worked closely with the White House, and made a well-received speech pleading for a halt to morality tests for elected officials. BRUCE GRONBECK, a UI professor of communication studies, said Gephardt might have tapped into a growing public distaste for making political issues out of personal lives. "I think that will be a theme of Campaign 2000," Gronbeck said. "He is already striking that theme, and it is going to run from now until then." Versions of this story also appeared Dec. 25 in the MIAMI HERALD and AKRON (Ohio) BEACON JOURNAL.
http://www.phillynews.com:80/inquirer/98/Dec/25/national/GEP25.htm

NEW YORK TIMES, Dec. 24 - In an article about the Iowa Communications Network that lists telemedicine as one of the primary uses for the network, MICHAEL KIENZLE, associate dean of the UI College of Medicine, says the ICN gives Iowans access to the best medical care available in the state. Kienzle said he expects the network will be used more for doctor-patient consultation, as insurance companies become more comfortable with the practice.

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH, Dec. 23 - An article about a new brain surgery technique that uses magnets notes that the procedure is the brainchild of MATTHEW A. HOWARD, III, a UI associate professor of neurosurgery. Using Howard's technique, magnets guide metal-tipped catheters to a brain tumor, permitting doctors to safely perform a brain biopsy procedure. An article on this topic also appeared in the Dec. 25 CHICAGO SUN-TIMES.

MSNBC.COM, Dec. 23 - An article about a new brain surgery technique that uses magnets notes that the procedure is the brainchild of MATTHEW A. HOWARD, III, a UI associate professor of neurosurgery. Using Howard's technique, magnets guide metal-tipped catheters to a brain tumor, permitting doctors to safely perform a brain biopsy procedure.
http://www.msnbc.com/news/226088.asp

WALL STREET JOURNAL, Dec. 23 - Four leading physicians recommend Web sites that contain helpful medical information. Michael Rich, a pediatrician at Boston Children's Hospital recommends the UI and CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL OF IOWA's VIRTUAL HOSPITAL site, http://vh.radiology.uiowa.edu/VCH.

NEW YORK TIMES, Dec. 22 - Mylan Laboratories, one of the world's biggest makers of generic drugs, is being accused of violating antitrust laws, and the Federal Trade Commission said it would seek $120 million in refunds for consumers of two medications widely used to treat symptoms of anxiety. HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a University of Iowa law professor "who wrote a leading treatise on antitrust law," said a court order requiring consumer refunds was "an aggressive remedy" for the FTC to seek at the start of a case.

WEEKLY WORLD NEWS, Dec. 22 - In a question/answer column, the answer to the question, "What tone of voice should you use when asking someone for a favor," cites UNIVERSITY OF IOWA research. The answer says a UI study found that "loudness is a characteristic of persuasion."

NEWSDAY, Dec. 22 - An article about a study of the long-term effects of medicating children with Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD) says that the researchers began studying ADHD children ages 6-12 in the 1970s and then followed up when the subjects were in their 20s. One of the researchers, Jan Loney, now a psychologist at the State University of New York at Stony Brook, began the study at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where she "had a natural study design. There was one doctor who always medicated the children he diagnosed, and another who never did."

LOS ANGELES TIMES, Dec. 21 - An article about fiction writer Samantha Chang notes that she attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP.

WASHINGTON POST, Dec. 21 - An article about how the House impeachment vote will affect moderate Republicans in the next election lists Rep. Jim Leach as one Congressman who might have to explain his vote to liberal constituents. The article says that among those who will hold Leach accountable are STEVE and LESLEA COLLINS, both UI professors, who began the "Mad as Hell" anti-impeachment campaign in October. They delivered a box of anti-impeachment postcards to Leach's Washington office on Dec. 18. "It's only two years until the next election, and people feel very strongly about it," said Steve Collins.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/WPlate/1998-12/21/070l-122198-idx.html

PEOPLE, Dec. 21 - When Mildred Wirt Benson wrote the first Nancy Drew mysteries (under the pseudonym Carolyn Keene) she was "just trying to write a fast-moving story." But an article notes that despite those simple intentions, Nancy has become a feminist icon, studied and analyzed from the first book to the last. "The fictional girl detective has become the subject of books and dissertations, and a 1993 conference at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Benson's alma mater, included as topics for discussion, 'Stereotypical Racial and Ethnic Images in Nancy Drew' and 'Lesbian Code in Nancy Drew Mystery Stories.' "

SCIENCE NEWS, Dec. 19 & 26 - An article explains research by DAVID SOLL, a UI professor of biological sciences, which shows that HIV-infected cells fuse into massive entities known as syncytia. "Syncytia are short-lived, but they're self-perpetuating," Soll said. "Every time one blows up, so much virus comes out of it that everything around it gets infected and starts fusing."

TOLEDO (Ohio) BLADE, Dec. 19 - Mildred Wirt Benson, the first woman to receive a master's degree from the UI SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM, recently became the first recipient of The Blade's Lifetime Achievement Award for an Outstanding Journalist. The newspaper honored Benson for her more than 50 years at The Blade and the former Toledo Times. Benson has also gained fame as the author (under the pseudonym Carolyn Keene) of 22 Nancy Drew mysteries.
http://www.toledoblade.com:80/editorial/spot98/8l19hono.htm

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Dec. 18 - The University of Iowa's ARTS AND HUMANITIES INITIATIVE is featured as "a national example," a unique university commitment to funding research in the arts and humanities. The article notes that in persuading the Republican-controlled state legislature to create an annual appropriation for arts and humanities the UI scored "an unheard-of political victory." But JAY SEMEL, director of the Obermann Center for Advanced Study, says he's not surprised that the UI is breaking new ground. "The university has this kind of amazing tradition of the arts and humanities, and a tradition of innovation as well," he says. Also quoted are DAVID SKORTON, vice president for research, TERESA MANGUM, an associate professor of English, CHRISTOPHER ROY, a professor of art and art history, and L. LEE MCINTYRE, associate director of the Art and Life in Africa Project.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v45/i17/17a02801.htm (password needed)

LOS ANGELES TIMES, Dec. 18 - An Associated Press article about protests nationwide against the U.S. military action in Iraq quotes Ariella Ghanooni, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student. "I think Clinton should be impeached for killing Iraqi children," she said at a gathering of 50 protesters in downtown Iowa City. This article also appeared Dec. 18 in the ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH, USA TODAY, the AKRON (Ohio) BEACON JOURNAL, and GREENSBORO (N.C.) NEWS AND RECORD.

TIME OUT NEW YORK, Dec. 17 - An art review calls the "Victorian Fairy Painting" exhibit at the Frick Collection "one of the fall season's standouts." The exhibition was organized by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA MUSEUM OF ART.

DAILY OKLAHOMAN (Oklahoma City), Dec. 16 - An article about a group fighting to have a judge do away with a state requirement that second-trimester abortions be performed only in hospitals notes that SUSAN JOHNSON, an associate dean in the UI College of Medicine, will testify as a witness for the group, Reproductive Services of Tulsa.

WASHINGTON POST, Dec. 16 - An article about Congressmen who are still undecided about impeachment mentions Rep. Jim Leach, "an 11-term moderate Republican whose sharply divided district ranges from liberal Iowa City, home of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, to the more conservative and working-class Davenport."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/politics/special/clinton/stories/undecided121698.htm

N W D A WHOLESALERS: A VITAL LINK, Dec. 15 - A collection of Internet resources for those interested in telemedicine includes a description of the UI VIRTUAL HOSPITAL, <http://www.vh.org>. The article says the virtual hospital, one of the first telemedicine projects on the Web, "demonstrates a powerful and integrated use of knowledge systems and telecommunications."

WOODMEN, Dec. 15 - In an article about child development in the years leading to adolescence, JOHN SPENCER, a UI assistant professor of psychology, says that abstract thinking is still beyond the grasp of most 9- to 12-year-olds. They also have a more sophisticated understanding of morals. "Children at this age start to think about the intentions of people," Spencer says. He encourages parents and educators to "encourage flexibility of thought" among children of this age.

DETROIT FREE PRESS, Dec. 15 - Michigan is the "most fertile ground" for the grassroots National Mad As Hell Campaign, started by STEVE COLLINS and LESLEA HARAVON COLLINS, both UI professors. An article says that of the campaign's 24 chapters, three are in Michigan.
http://www.freep.com/news/nw/qmad15.htm

ABOUT.COM, Dec. 15, 1998 -- Author and UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP alumus T.C. Boyle is interviewed extensively about his work, life in Iowa and other topics. "The time when I was at Iowa was a time when I became serious about writing--as my life," Boyle says in the article. "Before that, as you probably know, I was pretty much of a degenerate, writing sporadically, and listening to a lot of bad habits and so on in New York. I'd never been west of New Jersey at that point, and I kind of grew up, because now I knew what I wanted to do, and I pursued it vigorously. I'm very proud of the fact that I made a perfect 4.0 in all of my graduate work, that I was a good student."
http://authors.about.com/arts/books/authors/library/weekly/aa121598.htm?IAM=DOGP

EYENET MAGAZINE, Dec. 15 - An article about a new ophthamology device called the Orbscan notes that JOHN E. SUTPHIN, JR., director of refractive surgery at the UI, has worked with the device extensively. "It gives us a 3-D sense about the cornea and probably will in the long run give us good ray tracing," he said.

DESERET NEWS (Salt Lake City), Dec. 14 - Faculty members at Brigham Young University have won this year's Helen Williams Award for Excellence in Independent Study. An article notes that this award--given by American Association for Collegiate Independent Study to recognize the most outstanding college-level, academic-credit course developed during the academic year--is named in honor of Helen Williams, who served as director of correspondence study at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA for 30 years and was a pioneer of distance education.
http://deseretnews.com:80/dn/view/0,1249,30001316,00.html

SCIENCE DAILY, Dec. 14 - An article about the value of stalagmites, in general, and especially those found in Crevice Cave, 75 miles south of St. Louis, in reconstructing records of climate change leading up to the last ice age (some 75,000 to 25,000 years ago), mentions LUIS GONZALEZ, UI associate professor of geology, as well as the University of Minnesota project leaders. The article references the publication of the researchers' scientific paper in the Dec. 4 issue of Science.

NEW YORK TIMES, Dec. 14 - An article about Iowans' views of whether President Clinton should be impeached notes that Rep. Jim Leach has heard a variety of opinions from his constituents because he "represents a district that is a melange of political views, from the liberal powerhouse of Iowa City, home of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, to the moderate and conservative views of people in working-class Davenport and business-minded Cedar Rapids."

DETROIT NEWS, Dec. 14 - An article about the ACT college entrance exam notes that the test evolved from the Iowa Tests of Educational Development at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://detnews.com:80/1998/classrooms/9812/14/12140083.htm

NEW YORK TIMES, Dec. 13 - In the wake of several large and complex corporate mergers in recent months, federal officials have filed a record number of challenges to mergers and other anticompetitive practices. HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a UI professor of law, said, "Antitrust is a highly political discipline, and it tends to ebb and flow. It's flowing right now."

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH, Dec. 13 - The newspaper publishes a project analyzing how well schools are teaching when differences in family income are factored out. H.D. HOOVER, a UI professor of education, offers several explanations for the correlation between low income and low educational achievement. An explanation of the project also notes that the newspaper hired BRENDA SUGRUE, a UI assistant professor of education, to advise reporters on their research.

NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW, Dec. 13 - KATHRYN HARRISON, a graduate of the UI WRITERS' WORKSHOP, reviews the book, "The Silent Duchess," by Dacia Maraini. Harrison's most recent books are a novel, "Poison," and a memoir, "The Kiss."

DENVER ROCKY MOUNTAIN NEWS, Dec. 13 - An article about women who sue their employers for forcing them to wear high-heeled shoes cites UI law professor MARC LINDER as an expert on the legal issues involved. This article, originally from the HOUSTON CHRONICLE also appeared in the OMAHA WORLD-HERALD (Dec. 6) and the EDMONTON (Alberta) JOURNAL (Dec. 19).

DENVER POST, Dec. 13 - In the wake of several large and complex corporate mergers in recent months, federal officials have filed a record number of challenges to mergers and other anticompetitive practices. HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a UI professor of law, said, "Antitrust is a highly political discipline, and it tends to ebb and flow. It's flowing right now." This article originally appeared in the Dec. 13 NEW YORK TIMES.

SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER, Dec. 13 - In a column about women's magazines, the writer bemoans the demise of "Ms." and the generation of younger women who contributed to its decline by taking for granted the accomplishments of the feminist movement. The writer cites an informal survey by LINDA KERBER, UI professor of history, who found that among women not enrolled in a women's history class, none would admit to being feminists. "They had no idea of the way the decks were stacked against women legally in the recent past; no sense of the fragility of improvementsthey had no idea that their freedom to major in math or science was a feminist accomplishment," Kerber said.

IOWA FARMER TODAY, Dec. 12 - A list of suggested Christmas gifts includes the book "Gardening in Iowa and Surrounding Areas," by Veronica Lorson Fowler published by UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS.

THE OREGONIAN (Portland, Ore.), Dec. 12 - An article about the Catholic feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe quotes DEBRA BLAKE, a UI visiting assistant professor of English. "Historically and culturally, the Virgin of Guadalupe stands as a uniquely paradoxical figure," she says. Some think Guadalupe has been used for centuries by the church to subjugate indigenous people, the poor and women with a message of self-sacrifice, acceptance and the promise of a reward in the next life. But the image has also galvanized many liberation movements, from the Mexican Revolution to the United Farm Workers' boycotts.
http://www.oregonlive.com:80/todaysnews/9812/st121207.html

DETROIT FREE PRESS, Dec. 12 - After a graduate student shot and killed the professor whose class he was failing at Wayne State University, the university community is looking for answers. An article notes that this is not the first time a graduate student has taken such drastic measures and cites the 1996 killings of three professors at San Diego State University and the 1991 killings of five people including three professors at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.freep.com/news/locway/qcampus12.htm

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Dec. 11 - An article about UI law professor LEA VANDER VELDE's research on the Dred Scott case outlines VanderVelde's theory that Harriet Robinson Scott was the "real force" behind the Scott family's struggle for freedom. Mrs. Scott filed a lawsuit in her own name, one that was eventually collapsed into her husband's famous one. And while Mr. Scott viewed the 11-year legal battle as a "heap o' trouble," VanderVelde says, Mrs. Scott forcefully and vocally maintained her claim that her family was free, and that she could earn a good-enough living to care for them. "Nonetheless," says Ms. VanderVelde, "conventional history has relegated her life to a footnote."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v45/i16/16a01401.htm (password needed)

USA TODAY, Dec. 11 - An article about "That '70s Show," a new program this season on the Fox network, notes that one of the actors on the show, Ashton Kutcher, was an engineering student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA before he was "discovered by a local talent scout."

BLACK ISSUES IN HIGHER EDUCATION, Dec. 10 - A brief item notes that at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA black undergraduates are more likely than other minorities to leave before completing a degree.

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION (Academe Today), Dec. 9 - Four UI faculty members are among the new recipients of awards from the National Endowment for the Humanities. The NEH awarded $30,000 each to KATHLEEN DIFFLEY, associate professor of English; HENRY HORWITZ, professor of history; LESLIE SCHWALM, associate professor of history; and KATHERINE TACHAU, professor of history. These awards are among $8.7-million in grants and fellowships for 173 individual scholars and 10 colleges and universities.
http://chronicle.com/daily/98/12/98120909n.htm (password needed)

LOS ANGELES TIMES, Dec. 9 - An article about groups that have been vocal in favor of or against impeaching President Clinton mentions UI professors STEVE COLLINS and LESLEA HARAVON COLLINS and their "Mad as Hell" campaign. Members of their group are sending bright red post cards to Congress opposing impeachment.

DOCTORS' GUIDE TO THE INTERNET, Dec. 8 - This news Web site for physicians reports as its top news of the day that UI researchers have demonstrated, for the first time, a correlation between juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) and low hormone levels in synovial fluid and serum. While further investigation is needed to determine how the hormones affect the disease, these findings show promise for developing possible hormone treatment strategies to help fight JRA, said MARY HENDRIX, a UI professor and head of anatomy and cell biology.
http://www.pslgroup.com:80/dg/ca236.htm

NEW YORK TIMES, Dec. 8 - A brief item in the Science Times section says UNIVERSITY OF IOWA scientists are working in Crevice Cave in southeastern Missouri, seeking new clues to changes in vegetation and climate that occurred thousands of years ago. The scientists, along with colleagues from the University of Minnesota analyzed stalagmites from the cave for evidence of what things were like above ground 75,000 to 25,000 years ago. They reported their results in the current issue of the journal "Science."

CHICAGO SUN-TIMES, Dec. 8 - A profile of author T. Coraghessen Boyle says he attended the UI WRITERS' WORKSHOP and then continued studying here, "earning a 4.0 average and a doctorate in 19th century English literature."

USA TODAY, Dec. 8 - Fertility clinics all over the country are storing thousands of frozen embryos waiting for the couples responsible for them to decide how to proceed. An increasingly common decision is "embryo adoption," an article says. About 40 couples are waiting for donor embryos at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, says BRAD VAN VOORHIS, director of reproductive endocrinology and infertility. Since early last year, Van Voorhis says, his clinic has transferred embryos to eight women, and four are now pregnant.

COLUMBUS (Ohio) DISPATCH, Dec. 7 - An article about luxury suites in sports venues, notes that the UI football stadium has 17 suites (an example of a low number of such facilities) which each have eight to 12 seats and are leased for 10 years at $120,000 to $180,000.

OMAHA WORLD-HERALD, Dec. 6 - An article about women who sue their employers for forcing them to wear high-heeled shoes cites UI law professor MARC LINDER as an expert on the legal issues involved.

NEW YORK TIMES, Dec. 6 - An article about the Adobe Theater Company notes that Erin Quinn Purcell and Gregory Jackson, who wrote and staged its current production, "Duet! A Romantic Fable," met and dated 12 years ago as freshmen at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.

SEATTLE TIMES, Dec. 5 - An article suggesting "gifts for gardeners" includes the book "Parsnips in the Snow," by Jane Anne Staw and Mary Swander, published by UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Dec. 4 - An article about the indictment of four former Northwestern University football players who are accused of lying to a federal grand jury when they denied betting on Northwestern games in 1994, notes that the investigation began after teammates accused a star tailback of intentionally fumbling in the 1994 game against the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Iowa was favored to win the game by six points, but beat Northwestern 49-13. The former Northwestern players are accused of betting on that game as well as games that season against Ohio State University and Notre Dame. The CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, NEW YORK TIMES, WASHINGTON POST, LOS ANGELES TIMES, USA TODAY, and CHICAGO SUN-TIMES also ran stories Dec. 4 about the indictments.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/sports/college/article/0,1051,ART-19569,00.html

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Dec. 4 - The Hot Type publishing column features the new book by RICHARD HORWITZ, a UI American Studies professor, "Hog Ties: Pigs, Manure, and Mortality in American Culture." Horwitz, who for 20 years has moonlighted as a farm hand, said, "The things that we view as small and embarrassing can tell us a lot about what it means to be alive." He decided to write the book because, "I discovered that the two worlds I worked in, as a professor of American studies and as a farmer, actually spoke to each other."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v45/i15/15a02001.htm (password needed)

HOUSTON CHRONICLE, Dec. 3 - 1998 has been a blockbuster year for corporate mergers and acquisitions and some critics fear that anti-trust laws are being circumvented or even ignored. However, JOHN SOLOW, a UI professor of economics, said he believes regulators are generally asking the right questions when it comes to megamergers and competition issues. "I don't think we need to rethink the way we think about mergers," he said, adding that he doesn't believe the Clinton anti-trust officials have been asleep at the wheel. This article also appeared in the DESERET NEWS (Salt Lake City), Dec. 8.
http://deseretnews.com:80/dn/view/0,1249,20000999,00.html

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Dec. 3 - KIRK FERENTZ is the new head football coach at the UI, replacing the retiring HAYDEN FRY. This news also appeared Dec. 3 in USA TODAY, BALTIMORE SUN and WICHITA EAGLE; Dec. 2 in the WASHINGTON POST, BOSTON GLOBE, FOX SPORTS, CNN/SI and CBS SPORTSLINE.
http://cbs.sportsline.com:80/u/sportsticker/html/collegefootball/LGNS/FBC--FERENTZ-X.HTM

(Louisville, Ky.) COURIER-JOURNAL, Dec. 3 - In an article about electric toothbrushes, NANCY SLACH, a hygenist who teaches at the UI College of Dentistry, says the toothbrushes work well for "over-vigorous brushers" because the gadgets apply steady, uniform pressure on teeth. Too much pressure can cause receding gums. This article, originally from the DES MOINES REGISTER, also appeared in the SAN ANTONIO (Tex.) EXPRESS-NEWS (Dec. 6), the TULSA (Okla.) WORLD (Dec. 20), and THE (New Castle, Del.) NEWS JOURNAL (Dec. 21).

STAR TRIBUNE (Minneapolis), Dec. 2 - A new report submitted to the federal judge who oversees lawsuits about breast implants says that the panel of doctors appointed by the judge determined that scientific evidence has so far failed to show that silicone breast implants cause disease. MICHAEL GREEN, a UI law professor who has no connection with the implant litigation, but who studies the use of scientific evidence in toxic substance litigation, says this is bad news for plaintiffs. "This is about as damaging a report from the plaintiffs' point of view as I can imagine," he said. "If I were a plaintiffs' lawyer, I'd be beside myself." As a consequence of the report, Green said, "I think it will be hard to find a federal judge who will permit a case to be tried or who will sustain on post trial motions a plaintiff's claims to systemic disease." This article, originally from the Dec. 2 NEW YORK TIMES, also appeared Dec. 2 in (Portland, Ore.) OREGONIAN, (Allentown, Pa.) MORNING CALL, the AUSTIN (Tex.) AMERICAN-STATESMAN, (Memphis) COMMERCIAL APPEAL and (New Orleans) TIMES PICAYUNE.

MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE, Dec. 2 - New newspapers in China are drawing readers away from, "The People's Daily," which was once the only newspaper available and was the official mouthpiece of the Communist government. Although the new upstart papers are all owned by units of the Communist Party, they are increasingly operating freely and publishing stories about official corruption. JUDY POLUMBAUM, a UI associate professor of journalism, is quoted as a specialist in Chinese media. She says, "The one area that's really off-limits to `real' reporting is politics - domestic and foreign policy." This article originally appeared in NEWSDAY Nov. 27.

CHARLOTTE (N.C.) OBSERVER, Dec. 2 - An editorial against the death penalty cites UNIVERSITY OF IOWA research that showed a link between race and the death penalty. DAVID BALDUS, a UI law professor, examined more than 1,000 cases from 1983 to 1993 in Philadelphia and found that black defendants were 3.9 times more likely to get a death sentence than were all other defendants convicted for similar crimes and under similar circumstances. This editorial was reprinted in the GREENSBORO (N.C.) NEWS & RECORD Dec. 3

NEW YORK TIMES, Dec. 2 - A new report submitted to the federal judge who oversees lawsuits about breast implants says that the panel of doctors appointed by the judge determined that scientific evidence has so far failed to show that silicone breast implants cause disease. MICHAEL GREEN, a UI law professor who has no connection with the implant litigation, but who studies the use of scientific evidence in toxic substance litigation, says this is bad news for plaintiffs. "This is about as damaging a report from the plaintiffs' point of view as I can imagine," he said. "If I were a plaintiffs' lawyer, I'd be beside myself." As a consequence of the report, Green said, "I think it will be hard to find a federal judge who will permit a case to be tried or who will sustain on post trial motions a plaintiff's claims to systemic disease." This article also appeared Dec. 2 in THE (Memphis) COMMERCIAL APPEAL and THE (New Orleans) TIMES PICAYUNE.

DETROIT NEWS, Dec. 2 - In a story about what happens to a small town when a school closes or school districts consolidate, UI education professor GEORGE CHAMBERS says, "The greatest loss is a high school." A high school is usually the geographic, social and political center of town, he says, and when it closes, "the focal point shifts" -- to another town. This article originally appeared in the WALL STREET JOURNAL (Nov. 13).

ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION, Dec. 1 - Even in the middle of a politically embarrassing impeachment struggle, President Clinton has been portrayed more favorably in television news than his adversaries. BRUCE GRONBECK, a UI professor of communication studies, said Clinton is "the almost perfect television president." He added: "Clinton has the ability to use television's great power, which is to present emotions or feelings up close and personal. He can express a phenomenal range of emotions by very small adjustments in his facial features. It's utterly amazing how good he is at it - as good as any television actor."

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Dec. 1 - An obituary for Margaret Walker Alexander, a writer and poet, notes that she attended graduate school at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Alexander was best known for her novel "Jubilee," published in 1966, which told the life story of the daughter of a slave and a white plantation owner. The obituary also appeared Dec. 1 in the WASHINGTON POST, USA TODAY, CNN.COM, MIAMI HERALD, BALTIMORE SUN, ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH, SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, AKRON BEACON JOURNAL, GREENSBORO (N.C.) NEWS & RECORD, THE (Memphis) COMMERCIAL APPEAL, and on the Wall Street Journal's DOW JONES NEWS WIRE. Obituaries also ran Dec. 2 in the BOSTON GLOBE, PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, and LOS ANGELES TIMES, as well as Dec. 4 in the NEW YORK TIMES and Dec. 14 in JET MAGAZINE.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/splash/article/0,1051,SAV-9812010165,00.html

MEN'S HEALTH, December 1998 - RICHARD WILLIAMS, professor and chairman of the UI department of urology, is quoted in an article about the importance of self-exams for maintaining personal health. He says it's important to get into the habit at a young age and "an easy way to remember your self-exam is to tie it to some other monthly activity."

POPULAR MECHANICS, December 1998 - New data from researchers at the University of California at Berkeley refutes UI physics and astronomy professor LOUIS FRANK's theory that house-sized comets bombard the Earth's atmosphere every few seconds. The California researchers say earlier evidence of those comets is actually electronic noise from instruments inside the satellite that detected them.

FITNESS, December 1998 - A study by DAVID WATSON, a UI professor of psychology, found that those who go to bed early and wake up early are generally in a better mood than those who stay up late. "One theory is that morning types have more consistent sleep habits," Watson said. A report on this finding also appears in the December 1998 issue of ALLURE.

CURRENTS, December 1998 - An article about the need to review internal publications with a critical eye cites the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA as an example of an institution that benefited from such an examination.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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