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UI in the News

August, 1998

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SAN FRANCISCO EXAMINER, Aug. 31 - HERBERT HOVENKAMP, professor of law, was quoted in a story on new charges that Microsoft engaged in monopolistic practices to keep competitors out of some software markets. Hovenkamp said that if the allegations are true, they could pose more troubles for Microsoft unless the company "can provide a convincing, factually supported efficiency explanation of why exclusivity is necessary." The story, which originally appeared in the SEATTLE TIMES, also appeared in the (Newark, N.J. STAR-LEDGER).

OMAHA (Neb.) WORLD-HERALD, Aug. 31 - An editorial noted that the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Greek system took a "small step closer to a more responsible approach to alcohol" by voluntarily banning alcohol a year ahead of a UI administration moratorium.

U.S. NEWS & WORLD REPORT, Aug. 31 - The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA was listed as the 26th best public university in the country in the magazine's annual college ranking issue. Stories noting the ranking appeared in the Riverside, Calif. PRESS-ENTERPRISE and the OMAHA (Neb.) WORLD-HERALD.

ST. PETERSBURG (Fla.) TIMES, Aug. 31 - PETER BLANCK, professor of law, was quoted in a story on the case of a Florida woman who claims Hernando County officials failed to accommodate her under the Americans with Disabilities Act by refusing to let her park in an underground garage. http://www.sptimes.com:80/Hernando/83198/Disability__loss_of_p.html

BOSTON BUSINESS JOURNAL, Aug 31 - A biomedical company founded by Dr. ARTHUR KRIEG, associate professor of internal medicine, has hired the co-founder of the drug company Sepracor as president and chief executive officer, according to a brief item. Krieg, who founded CpG ImmunoPharmaceuticals Inc., will remain as the company's chief scientific officer for the company that develops DNA-based products. http://www.amcity.com:80/boston/stories/083198/newscolumn2.html

NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW, Aug. 30 - The weekly supplement featured the work of several writers with UI connections: Robert Houston, graduate of the UI WRITERS' WORKSHOP, reviewed a collection of fiction by Beth Lordan; a new memoir by Abraham Verghese, graduate of the UI Writers' Workshop, was reviewed; a memoir by Christopher Dickey, son of former UI Writers' Workshop faculty member James Dickey, was reviewed; "Timequake," by Kurt Vonnegut, former faculty member at the UI Writers' Workshop, was listed in the "New and Noteworthy" column.

STARS AND STRIPES, Aug. 30 - A story on a new study into the cause of Gulf War Syndrome featuring the work of Dr. BRADLEY DOEBBELING, associate professor of preventive medicine, was published. Doebbeling's new, four-year, $2.2 million study is a follow-up to a 1997 study an will take a closer look at veterans who report symptoms for the syndrome.

SAN ANTONIO EXPRESS-NEWS, Aug. 30 - A financial columnist published a Q&A based on a geological report published by Walter Youngquist, who holds a doctorate from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.

SEATTLE TIMES, Aug. 30 - HERBERT HOVENKAMP, professor of law, was quoted in a story on new charges that Microsoft engaged in monopolistic practices to keep competitors out of some software markets. Hovenkamp said that if the allegations are true, they could pose more troubles for Microsoft unless the company "can provide a convincing, factually supported efficiency explanation of why exclusivity is necessary."

BALTIMORE SUN, Aug. 30 - H.D. HOOVER, director of the Iowa Basic Skills Testing Program and professor of psychological and quantitative foundations, was quoted in a story examining results from a new standardized test being used by the Baltimore County schools. The first set of results show reading scores are up, but Hoover cautioned not to read too much into a single set of data. For the full story: http://www.sunspot.net/cgi-bin/editorial/story.cgi?storyid=900000183592

SCIENCE NEWS, Aug. 29 - A writer of a letter to the editor said he found "it unsettling when scientists appear as flaming advocates of their findings" and included LOUIS FRANK, professor of physics and astronomy, as an example.

NEW SCIENTIST, Aug. 29 - Work by DEBASHISH BHATTACHARYA, assistant professor of biological sciences, was reported in a story on the role certain plant genes play in the diversity of plant species. For the full story: http://www.newscientist.com:80/ns/980829/nplants.html

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION's ALMANAC Issue, Aug. 28 - The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, according to compilations of 1996 data, has the 37th largest enrollment in the country with 28,447 students; is the 29th largest awarder of earned doctorates with 377; is 36th in federal research-and-development expenditures with $105.6 million; has the 99th largest endowment (1997 figures) at $302.8 million; has the 30th largest research library based on number of volumes, serial additions and staff. The issue also included an entry for Iowa that has several UI mentions, including the journal "100 Words" and legal efforts by doctors at the COLLEGE OF MEDICINE to block the state's partial-birth abortion law.

PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, Aug. 27 - A story on changes in museum personnel noted that Kathleen Edwards of the Philadelphia Museum of Art has taken a job at the UI MUSEUM OF ART.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Aug. 27 - A feature story on Iowa football coach HAYDEN FRY and the Iowa Hawkeyes profiled the 1998 season and speculated on Fry's retirement plans. Fry plans to keep coaching "Until I feel like it's time to leave. I can't even tell you what the criteria is for that because I don't know," the story reported.

CHCAGO TRIBUNE, Aug. 26 - A Q&A roundup of the fall 1998 football season speculated that this would be Iowa football coach HAYDEN FRY's last year and that he would be "sorely" missed for speaking his mind and would be remembered for his efforts to racially integrate the Southwest Conference while coaching Southern Methodist in 1966.

WNBC (New York City NBC affiliate), Aug. 26 - PEVERILL SQUIRE, professor of political science, provided commentary on New York City Mayor Rudolph Guiliani's recent trip to Iowa and Guiliani's chances as a possible Republican presidential candidate in the 2000 caucuses.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Aug. 25 - Athletes and their significant others are no longer wearing letter sweaters at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA or anywhere else in the Big 10 conference or at high schools in the Midwest, columnist Bob Greene has discovered. In an informal survey of the changing times, Greene polled Big 10 schools, high schools and sporting goods stores and could not find letter sweaters. Athletes wear letter jackets, but not letter sweaters, was the answer.

CHICAGO SUN-TIMES, Aug. 25 - Andre M. Grant, a lawyer representing an 8-year-old Chicago boy charged with murdering an 11-year-old girl, is a 1993 graduate of the UI COLLEGE OF LAW, according to a story on the legal teams in the case. Grant also was president of the Black American Law Students Association, the story noted.

ARIZONA REPUBLIC, Aug. 25 - A story on a new book, "America's 100 Best College Buys," noted that the UI was the only Big 10 school to make the rankings.

USA TODAY, Aug. 24 - The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA was listed as one of the universities "leading the way in banning or restricting" amorous relationships between faculty/staff supervisors and the students and employees they oversee in a longer story on the ways different workplaces would deal with President Clinton's admission of an "improper relationship" with an intern.

DOW JONES NEWSWIRES, Aug. 24 - UROSURGE INC. of Coralville (the OAKDALE RESEARCH PARK) has scrapped plans for a $40 million initial public offering, according to a brief item.

NEW YORK TIMES, Aug. 24 - An obituary for Juanita Kidd Stout, the first black woman in the United States elected as a judge, noted that she received a bachelor's degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Similar stories appeared in the PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER and stories by REUTERS news wire appeared in the LOS ANGELES TIMES and by the ASSOCIATED PRESS in the CHICAGO TRIBUNE and the SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS.

WASHINGTON POST, Aug. 24 - The new president and chief executive officer of the Fannie Mae Foundation, Ann Marie Wheelock, has a bachelor's degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, according to an item featuring people "New at the Top." The Fannie Mae Foundation is a Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit organization that works to provide affordable housing opportunities. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/WPlate/1998-08/24/035l-082498-idx.html

NURSING WEEKLY, Aug. 24 - A story on compulsive shopping was based on research and comments by Dr. DONALD BLACK, professor of psychiatry. The ASSOCIATED PRESS study was based on a study Black published in the American Journal of Psychiatry that identified the typical compulsive shopper as a female with close relatives who also have the compulsion.

SALON, Aug. 24 - A new novel by ETHAN CANIN, graduate of and currently a faculty member in the UI WRITERS' WORKSHOP, was reviewed.

ST. PAUL (Minn.) PIONEER PRESS, Aug. 23 - A long profile of two-time Minnesota state high school wrestling champion Jeff Stewart, who spent 29 days in a coma this spring after a car accident, focused on his dream of wrestling in college for the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Hawkeye wrestlers and coaches, including DAN GABLE, JIM ZALESKY, and TOM and TERRY BRANDS, visited Stewart regularly when he was in the hospital, the story noted.

BALTIMORE SUN, Aug. 21 - A guest opinion by MARY SUE COLEMAN, UI president, on steps needed to combat the epidemic of binge drinking on American college campuses was published. The op-ed also appeared in the ATLANTA CONSTITUTION. From the SUN: http://www.sunspot.net/cgi-bin/editorial/story.cgi?storyid=900000176950

ORLANDO (Fla.) SENTINEL, Aug. 21 - ARTHUR MILLER, professor of political science, was quoted in a story analyzing President Clinton's motives for retaliating against terrorist groups in Afghanistan and Sudan. "Isn't it unfortunate that the president now cannot do his presidential duties without constantly being asked whether this is something that he has contrived so as to better his own personal situation?" Miller said.

PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, Aug. 21 - ARTHUR MILLER, professor of political science, was quoted in a story analyzing President Clinton's motives for retaliating against terrorist groups in Afghanistan and Sudan. "Isn't it unfortunate that the president now cannot do his presidential duties without constantly being asked whether this is something that he has contrived so as to better his own personal situation?" Miller said. The story also appeared in the SPOKANE (Wash.) SPOKESMAN-REVIEW.

NEWSDAY, Aug. 19 - KEN CMIEL, professor of history, published a guest opinion, arguing that the "analysis" of President Clinton's speech on the Monica Lewinsky scandal and of the scandal in general is little more than mindless chatter adding little to the public life of democracy.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Aug. 18 - An obituary for prominent Chicago environmental attorney Mary Therese Yasdick noted that she graduated from the UI COLLEGE OF LAW.

NATIONAL LAW JOURNAL, Aug. 17 - "The Quality of First Amendment Speech," an article by RANDALL BEZANSON, professor of law, was included in the weekly newspaper's "Worth Reading" compilation.

USA TODAY, Aug. 17 - The "Across the Nation: News from Every State" item reported a study by Dr. DONALD BLACK, professor of psychiatry, who found that compulsive gamblers often suffer from other psychological disorders.

USA TODAY, Aug. 17 - Dr. Abraham Verghese, graduate of the UI WRITERS WORKSHOP, was profiled for his new memoir.

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION's Academe Today, Aug. 17 - MARK S. BLUMBERG, associate professor of psychology, was one of 28 scholars to receive a 1998 Gold Medal Award from the American Psychological Foundation at the American Psychological Association's annual meeting Aug. 15. Blumberg was honored for early-career contributions to psychology in animal learning and behavioral and comparative psychology.

BUSINESS WEEK, Aug. 17 - The IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS (IEM) of the UI COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION were part of a study on presidential hopeful Steve Forbes' impact on the municipal bond market that was reported in the magazine. Researchers at Michigan compared Forbes' standing in the IEM during his 1996 campaign and the spread between taxable and tax-exempt bonds, speculating that the differences indicated how seriously bond traders' took the likelihood that Forbes' "flat-tax" would succeed.

OMAHA WORLD-HERALD, Aug. 17 - Compulsive gamblers often suffer from other psychological disorders, according to an ASSOCIATED PRESS story reporting the findings of Dr. DONALD BLACK, professor of psychiatry. Black said his study indicates that compulsive gamblers need sophisticated help from mental health professionals to get over their addictions.

AMERICAN MEDICAL NEWS, Aug. 17 - In a roundup of news from around the country, an item noted that "The Project on Death in America" awarded $1.5 million to 12 scholars, including a grant to the UI COLLEGE OF MEDICINE "to develop telemedicine applications in palliative care for those working in rural areas."

SAN FRANCISCO EXAMINER, Aug. 16 - BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, UI professor of sport, health, leisure, and physical studies, was quoted in a "Career Search" column on the "downshifting" trend among American workers. Hunnicutt said that the trend among some workers who want to spend less time at the office and more time with family or pursuing personal dreams may be transitory because "work is no longer a means to an end but has become an end in itself -- the center of our culture." The story was originally published in the DALLAS MORNING NEWS.

ENVIRONMENTAL NEWS, Aug. 15 - The UI COLLEGE OF MEDICINE was included in a story as one of several universities receiving federal grants to create research centers to study environmental health hazards faced by children. The UI received $1.21 million to investigate respiratory ailments in rural children. A brief item also appeared in the AIR/WATER POLLUTION REPORT magazine.

TODAY'S CHEMIST AT WORK, Aug. 15 - The "Computers in Chemistry" section featured an article analyzing search engines on the World Wide Web. The analysis was written by Terrance A. Rooney, who according to the author's note, holds a doctorate in physical analytical chemistry from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.

UROLOGY TIMES, Aug. 15 - Dr. RICHARD WILLIAMS, professor and head of urology, interviewed the new president of the American Urological Association for a Q&A feature in the magazine.

SKIN AND ALLERGY NEWS, Aug. 15 - A story reporting news from the annual meeting of the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery featured a study by Dr. MICHAEL J. O'DONNELL, assistant professor of dermatology, who found that patients who had ear tumors removed through a surgical technique known as Mohs microsurgery had fewer reoccurrences of the tumor than other patients.

DERMATOLOGY TIMES, Aug. 15 - The website for the UI DEPARTMENT OF DERMATOLOGY was cited as an excellent source for information for dermatologist searching online. The site - http://tray.dermatology.uiowa.edu/Home.html - is maintained by Dr. TOM RAY, professor of dermatology, the story noted.

HEARING HEALTH, Aug. 15 - A brief item noted that the UI's program in SPEECH PATHOLOGY AND AUDIOLOGY was rated as the best in audiology in the first rankings of the specialties by U.S. NEWS AND WORLD REPORT.

HEALTH DATA MANAGEMENT, Aug. 15 - A partnership between the UI COLLEGE OF MEDICINE and the Lawrence, Kan.-based company HELP Innovations to provide home health care monitoring and consultation over an interactive telecommunications system was featured in a story on how new technology is being used to manage diseases in the home.

R &D MAGAZINE, Aug. 15 - The magazine featured a story on the NATIONAL ADVANCED DRIVING SIMULATOR (NADS) being built at the OAKDALE RESEARCH PARK. The story quoted ED HAUG, director of NADS.

CHRONCLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Aug. 14 - "Stored Tissue Samples: Ethical, Legal, and Public Policy Implications," edited by ROBERT F. WEIR, professor of medical ethics, and published by the UI PRESS, was included in the roundup "New Scholarly Books."

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Aug. 14 - A profile of Silas Purnell, director of the educational-services arm of Ada S. McKinley Community Services in Chicago, mentioned that he has helped send students to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Aug. 14 - A list of colleges and universities that have unionized graduate students included the UI.

MIDLANDS BUSINESS JOURNAL (Omaha), Aug. 13, 15, 20 and 27 - A roundup of news from publications owned by the MIDLANDS BUSINESS JOURNAL Corp. included an item on a pilot program to promote farm safety being tested at the UI.

BOSTON GLOBE, Aug. 13 - The UI COLLEGE OF MEDICINE was one of nine research centers receiving federal grants to study environmental health threats to children, according to a story. The ASSOCIATED PRESS story also appeared in the (Los Angeles) METROPOLITAN NEWS-ENTERPRISE, the (Fort Lauderdale, Fla.) SUN-SENTINEL. A similar story appeared in the DALLAS MORNING NEWS, NEWSDAY and the MIDLANDS BUSINESS JOURNAL. A LOS ANGELES TIMES version of the story also appeared in the DALLAS MORNING NEWS.

SEATTLE TIMES, Aug. 13 - HERBERT HOVENKAMP, professor of law, was quoted in a story on a little-used, 1913 provision in antitrust law that requires depositions in antitrust cases be made public. The issue has come up in Microsoft Corp.'s battle with the U.S. Justice Department.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Aug. 12 - Dr. RICHARD KERBER, professor of internal medicine, was quoted in a story on efforts to expand the use of automated external defibrillators, the devices that shock the heart into a normal rhythm following a heart attack. The American Heart Association is pushing plans to locate defibrillators in public places so that the first people to reach a heart attack victim can use the devices to help heart attack victims.

USA TODAY, Aug. 10 - Iowa football coach HAYDEN FRY would like his successor to come from the Hawkeye system such as a coach he has worked with or a former player he has coached, according to a brief item.

LOS ANGELES TIMES, Aug. 10 - The UI COLLEGE OF MEDICINE was one of nine research centers receiving federal grants to study environmental health threats to children, according to a story. The UI grant will focus on respiratory illnesses among rural children. A REUTERS news service story on the grants also appeared in the paper and on the CNN Interactive website. The ASSOCIATED PRESS also distributed a story on its national news wires.

FIRST FOR WOMEN, Aug. 10 - Dr. SUSAN R. JOHNSON, professor of obstetrics and gynecology, was quoted in a story on new discoveries about and treatments for women suffering from premenstrual syndrome.

(Allentown, Penn.) MORNING CALL, Aug. 9 - The findings of DR. KENNETH G. SAAG, assistant professor of internal medicine, and colleagues were reported. The researchers found that the drug alendronate (trade name Fosamax) can ward off osteoporosis in people who take steroid drugs for arthritis, asthma and other diseases. The study was published in the New England Journal of Medicine. The story, which originally appeared in the WASHINGTON POST, also appeared in the PROVIDENCE (R.I.) JOURNAL. A brief item on the research also appeared in CHAIN DRUG REVIEW.

WASHINGTON POST, Aug. 9 - A review of the book, "Battlegrounds of Memory," by Clay Lewis noted that Lewis received a master's degree in writing from the UI.

LOS ANGELES TIMES, Aug. 8 - An obituary for noted atomic physicist Robert Cornog mentioned that he earned his bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from the UI. The story also appeared in the SAN JOSE (Calif.) MERCURY NEWS.

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Aug. 7 - JOHN M. WIENCEK, associate professor of chemical and biochemical engineering, was included in a list of recent recipients of grants from the Whitaker Foundation. Wiencek's project involves maintaining X-ray diffraction properties in protein crystals after flash cooling.

GRAND RAPIDS (Mich.) PRESS, Aug. 6 - A nationally distributed ASSOCIATED PRESS story on the influence of graduate writing programs focused heavily on the UI WRITERS' WORKSHOP. The story quoted FRANK CONROY, director of the Workshop, and ETHAN CANIN, a graduate who returned to the faculty this fall. "Founded in the 1930s, the (Iowa) workshop is the oldest and most prestigious academic writing program in the country," the story pointed out. The story also appeared in THE (Cleveland) PLAIN DEALER.

DENVER POST, Aug. 5 - A story on the failure of mergers between major corporations to live up to their expectations included a reference to a UI study that takeovers financed through stock do less well over the first five years than takeovers financed with cash.

LOS ANGELES TIMES, Aug. 5 - BONNIE SLATTON, chair of the department of sport, health, leisure, and physical studies, was quoted in a story on sanctions imposed by the NCAA on the athletics program at Texas Tech University. Slatton is acting chair of the NCAA Committee on Infractions, which found violations in nine sports at Texas Tech, going back to 1990. "I think it is rare to have this lack of level in monitoring, especially at a major institution like Texas Tech," Slatton said. "I don't know if we have had a case that reached this level." The REUTERS news service also distributed a story on its national news wires. A similar story appeared in the CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION's Academe Today. An ASSOCIATED PRESS version of the story, quoting Slatton, appeared in USA TODAY.

WASHINGTON POST, Aug. 4 - The findings of Dr. KENNETH G. SAAG, assistant professor of internal medicine, and colleagues were reported. The researchers found that the drug alendronate (trade name Fosamax) can ward off osteoporosis in people who take steroid drugs for arthritis, asthma and other diseases. The study was published in the New England Journal of Medicine. Similar stories appeared in the ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION, BOSTON GLOBE, Riverside, Calif. PRESS-ENTERPRISE, the LOS ANGELES TIMES, GRAND RAPIDS (Mich.) PRESS, the ORANGE COUNTY (Santa Ana, Calif.) REGISTER, the (Oklahoma City) DAILY OKLAHOMAN.

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION's ACADEME TODAY, Aug. 4 - TIMOTHY BARRETT, director of the UI Center for the Book, received a $25,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities for "a series of seminars for University of Iowa faculty and Book Center staff leading to the development of an interdisciplinary curriculum in book studies," according to a listing of recent recipients.

WASHINGTON POST, Aug. 3 - A profile of Rep. Greg Ganske, R-Iowa, noted that he received his bachelor's and medical degrees from the UI.

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH, Aug. 3 - Dr. DONALD BLACK, professor of psychiatry, was quoted in a UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE story on the increasing sales of valium and other tranquilizers. The story argued that the increase is a paradox given the generally positive economic news in the United States, but Black cautioned against reading too much into that because there is always a segment of the population that needs the drugs to deal with serious mental disorders. The story, originally from the NEWHOUSE NEWS SERVICE, also appeared in the (Cleveland) PLAIN DEALER.

NATIONAL LAW JOURNAL, Aug. 3 - The newspaper's summer reading list included two titles by UI faculty: "Speech Stories," by RANDALL BEZANSON, professor of law, was described as providing "startling" answers to some First Amendment questions, "but [the answers] are always thoughtful and provocative." And "Void Where Prohibited," by MARC LINDER, professor of law, and INGRID NYGAARD, associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology, was described as a "not-at-all frivolous book ... [Linder and Nygaard] cover the subject of bathroom breaks from A to P, linking it to 'scientific' management, employment law, the movement for a shorter work day and the Equal Rights Amendment."

LOS ANGELES TIMES, Aug. 2 - Dr. Clifford Smith, a graduate of the UI, was profiled as an example of a disappearing breed of country doctors. Smith, who was named the National Rural Health Association's Rural Health Practitioner of the Year, practices in McGregor. A native of Waterloo, Smith was a member of an elite, all-black group of fighter pilots while at the UI. The story, which originally appeared in the WASHINGTON POST, also appeared in the TORONTO STAR.

CALGARY (Alberta, Canada) HERALD, Aug. 1 - LOUIS FRANK, professor of physics and astronomy, was quoted in a story on new research on auroras. Frank recently reported data from NASA's Polar spacecraft that indicates auroral activity is much stronger along a coastline than over land, possibly because of the differences in electrical currents in seawater versus dry ground.

KIRKUS REVIEWS, Aug. 1 - "No Constitutional Right To Be Ladies: Women and the Obligations of Citizenship," by LINDA K. KERBER, professor of history, was reviewed as a "brilliant gender analysis from one of the leading historians of early America."

ABA JOURNAL, August - A report on a June conference on disability law sponsored by the American Bar Association noted that PETER BLANCK, professor of law, has been named the official reporter for the session, "In Pursuit ... A Blueprint for Disability Law and Policy."

PHYSICIANS FINANCIAL NEWS, August - A story on a recent study by faculty at the UI COLLEGE OF MEDICINE that analyzed the implications of allowing video cameras into delivery rooms argued that most media coverage of the study raised false alarms. "Perhaps the media debate has served to remind future patients, as well as doctors, that risk goes both ways," the story noted.

CONTROLLER MAGAZINE, August - DANIEL COLLINS, professor and chair of the department of accounting, was quoted in a story focusing on the COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION'S initiatives to improve writing and communications skills of accounting students.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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