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CONTACT: SCOTT HAUSER
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Iowa City IA 52242
(319) 384-0007; fax (319) 384-0024
e-mail: scott-hauser@uiowa.edu

Release: Immediate

UI graduate business program for executives hits enrollment record

IOWA CITY, Iowa -- A total of 42 mid-level and upper-level executives from prominent Iowa and Midwest companies have enrolled in the Executive Master of Business Administration (MBA) program at the University of Iowa for fall 1997, setting a new record for the program.

The previous record for enrollment in the two-year program, conducted by the UI College of Business Administration, was 35 students, set in 1991 and matched in 1995.

The students, who represent leading regional companies, will be on campus Monday, Aug. 18, through Friday, Aug. 22, for a week-long orientation and introduction to the program.

After that students will attend class on campus once a week for 21 months, allowing students to remain in their home communities and to continue working for their companies while they earn their degrees.

Beth Coronelli, interim director of the Executive MBA program, says interest in the program has been growing since it began more than 15 years ago.

"We've created a program that is tailored to meet the needs of individuals and the corporations who sponsor them in their education," Coronelli says. "Our graduates have achieved real success as a result of the program, and companies recognize the added value an MBA education offers."

Begun in 1979, the Executive MBA program is designed to allow management-level employees to earn a graduate degree in two years. Students generally have at least 10 years of work experience as managers before enrolling in the program.

Students come to campus on alternating Fridays and Saturdays during the school year for a day-long series of classes.

During the week, students meet in study groups made up of four to six classmates who work nearby.

Study groups use electronic mail, computer bulletin boards and other electronic technology to meet when members of the group are far apart, such as when traveling on business, or when their schedules are too busy to meet in person.

8/14/97